EXPIRED LISTINGS FROM 2003 MONITORING REMINDERS

UT WED JANUARY 1 WEDNESDAYS 2003y BEGINS Independence Day: Haiti, Sudan Tracking 2003`s arrival, hour by hour: http://www.rnw.nl/realradio/features/html/newyear021227.html http://www.ibcworks.net/ 0000-0100 *KOSU CAPITOL STEPS 0000-0100 *MPBN CAPITOL STEPS 0000-0100 *KUNM CAPITOL STEPS 0000-0100 *WDUQ CAPITOL STEPS 0000-0100 *WCVE CAPITOL STEPS 0000-0100 *VPR PLEASURES OF WINTER 0000-0300 *WHRB NYE IN VIENNA from recordings, concludes 0000-0500 *WQXR CLASSICAL COUNTDOWN continues, also 1400-0100 0030-0130 *WBHM CAPITOL STEPS 0030-0300 *BBCR2 ALL SINGING, ALL DANCING, NYE 0100-0200 *WYSO MOMBO NEW YEAR 0100-0200 *WUKY CAPITOL STEPS 0100-0200 *WYSO CAPITOL STEPS 0100-0300 *CBCR2 IN PERFORMANCE: Czerny Festival, duo-pianists 0100-0300 *WBGO LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *WCNY LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *MPBN LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *WFCR LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *WNYCF LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *WETA LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, [TV at 0400] 0100-0300 *WUGA LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *WLRN LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *WBEZ LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *KUHF LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0300 *KNAU LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin, PBS simulcast 0100-0500 *WMUB NEW YEAR`S EVE WITH MAMA`S AND SAM 0100-1000 *VPR TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0100-1000 *WHYY TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 [note: first two hours = LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER; not all stations list separately] 0100-1000 *KGOU TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Resolutions [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-0600 *WFUV `FUV FIRST NIGHT 0230-0300 *BBCWS OMNIBUS: The story of cochineal 0300-0400 *WOIf CAPITOL STEPS 0300-0400 *KMUW JAZZ FROM LINCOLN CENTER: Gagaku 0300-0500 *WNYCA PAUL WINTER, EVERYBODY UNDER THE SUN 0300-0500 *WNYCF PAUL WINTER, EVERYBODY UNDER THE SUN 0300-0500 *KUNI WORLD CAFE NY special 0300-XXXX *CBCR1 NORTHERN LIGHTS: waltz music from Vienna [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0300-XXXX *MPBN TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0300-XXXX *YPR TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0300-0830 *WBGO TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 [or -1000?] 0300-1000 *WFCR TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0300-1000 *WYSO TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0300-1000 *KANU TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0300-1000 *KPBX TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0300-1000 *WUGA BRUBECK IN CONCERT AND COREA `ROUND MIDNIGHT [=TOTN] 0300-1000 *KQED TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0300-XXXX *WBEZ TOAST OF THE NATION WELCOMES 2003 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Year in Review, part II 0400-0500 *WBAI SHORTCUT THRU 2002 0400-0500 *NWPR MOMbo NEW YEAR, REVELRY & REFLEXION 0400-0500 *KSFC CAPITOL STEPS 0400-0800 *KCRW NYE WITH JASON & GARTH 0400-XXXX *WOIf NYE JAZZ COAST TO COAST [= TOTN?] 0500-0700 *KUWR [non]LIVE FROM LINCOLN CENTER: All-Gershwin 0500-0800 *KUNI MIDNIGHT SPECIAL NYE GALA 0500-1000 *WMUB JAZZSET`S TOAST OF THE NATION 0600-0800 *KING SEATTLE SYMPHONY LIVE, Gerard Schwartz countdown to 2003 PST 0700-1000 *KUWR TOAST OF THE NATION [seems on 4-hour delay?] 0800-XXXX R. Nacional Amazonia, Lula inauguration coverage 6180 11780 [2-202] 1115-1230 *BBCR3 VIENNA NYD CONCERT [really live now, maybe also ORF SW] 1230-2400 *BBCR3 WORLD MUSIC DAY 1305-XXXX *CBCR1 NY MESSAGES FROM P.M., GOV. GENERAL [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1400-1500 *WDUQ CAPITOL STEPS 1400-1500 *VOA KIM ELLIOTT`S SPECIAL: including gh`s SHORTWAVE YEAR IN REVIEW +6110 7125 9645 9760 11705 15395 15425 [rpt 2200] 1400-1600 *WYSO BEST OF THE YIDDISH RADIO PROJECT 1400-0100 *WQXR CLASSICAL COUNTDOWN continues 1405-XXXX *CBCR2 NY MESSAGES FROM P.M., GOV. GENERAL 1500-XXXX *WOIf NY DAY FROM VIENNA [mistake for 1600?] 1500-1700 *KMUW THIRD COAST INTERNATIONAL AUDIO FESTIVAL 1530-1600 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: Story of Cochineal 1600-1700 *WBEZ MOMbo NY 1600-1700 *WOIa SEASON`S GRIOT 1600-1800 *CBCR1 FROST ON THE FRUITCAKE: SELLING XMAS NORTH OF 60 [+1/2/3/4h] 1600-1800 *MPBC NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *VPR NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *WFCR NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *WETA NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *WKARf NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *WUOT NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *WPLNf NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *WBHM NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *WPR NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *KUNI NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *KANU NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *KUHF NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *KNAU NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1800 *YPR NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1600-1900 *WYSO MIDNITE SPECIAL NY GALA 1630-1700 *BBCR4 SLAB CITY: Camp Dunlap, California 1700-1900 *KMUW BOSTON HOLIDAY POPS 1700-2300 *KCRW HITCHHIKER`S GUIDE TO THE GALAXY marathon, all 12 eps 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Kim Elliott hosts, gh participates [non]% +special 9775 17635 [2-202] 1800-1900 *MPBN CAPITOL STEPS 1800-1900 *WOIa PLEASURES OF WINTER 1800-1900 *WLRN A MOMbo NY: REVELRY & REFLEXION 1800-2000 *KPBX NY DAY FROM VIENNA 1900-2000 *BBCR2 NICK BARRACLOUGH: 50th anniversary of Hank Williams` death 1900-2000 *WYSO A MOMbo NY: REVELRY & REFLEXION 1900-2000 *WBEZ CAPITOL STEPS 2000-2045 *BBCR4 CHEERING UP BRITANNIA: Debate: UK best place to live? 1 of 2 2000-2100 *KPBX THIRD COAST INTERNATIONAL AUDIO FESTIVAL, pt 2 2000-2100 *KALW CAPITOL STEPS 2000-XXXX *MPBN HALLELUJAH HANDEL! 2000-2200 *KNPR NY DAY FROM VIENNA 2006-2030 *BBCWe LIFE & TIMES OF THE MOBILE PHONE, 2 of 2 2030-2100 *BBCWe SPORTS INTERNATIONAL: Review of the year 2100-2130 *BBCR4 WHAT REMAINS TO BE DISCOVERED: scientific progress, 1 of 4 2100-2200 *BBCR2 LITTLE RICHARD AT 70: A CELEBRATION 2100-2200 *OPB CAPITOL STEPS 2200-2230 *BBCR2 A VERY FERRY NEW YEAR 2200-2300 *VOA repeat of Kim Elliott special 11655 13710 17735 17820... 2300-2330 *BBCR4 NOT SO TINY TIM: Sequel to Xmas Carol, 2 of 2 2300-2400 *VPR CAPITOL STEPS 2300-0500 *WFUV IDIOT`S DELIGHT SPECIAL WITH VIN SCELSA UT THU JANUARY 2 THURSDAYS Sts. Basil & Greg. 0000-0100 *WQXR CLASSICAL COUNTDOWN concludes 0000-0100 *KUNI CAPITOL STEPS 0000-0500 *WFUV IDIOT`S DELIGHT SPECIAL WITH VIN SCELSA concludes 0100-0200 *WOIf CAPITOL STEPS 0100-0300 *WNYCa NY DAY FROM VIENNA 0100-0300 *WNYCf NY DAY FROM VIENNA 0100-0300 *WYSO WORLD CAFE NY SPECIAL 0100-0300 *WLRN XMAS REVELS [recomended! if you`ve not heard it yet, or have] 0200-0300 *KALW CAPITOL STEPS 0206-0230 *BBCWS LIFE & TIMES OF THE MOBILE PHONE, 2 of 2 0230-0300 *BBCWS SPORTS INTERNATIONAL: Review of the year 0300-0400 *WYSO SEASON`S GRIOT 0300-XXXX *WOIa TALES OF INTERNATIONAL ADOPTION 0300-0500 *KUHF HOUSTON SYMPHONY: Vienna and Beyond 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: the American Civil War 0400-0500 *WYSO ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Howard Zinn, Just & Unjust Wars 0400-0500 *KQED THE MIDEAST: A CENTURY OF CONFLICT 1506-1530 *BBCWe LIFE & TIMES OF THE MOBILE PHONE, 2 of 2 1530-1600 *BBCWe SPORTS INTERNATIONAL: review of the year 1600-1700 *BBCR3 MUSIC RESTORED: Hildegard and Bingen 1600-1700 *KMUW PRINCE OF PEACE, CONCORDIA COLLEGE MN 1630-1700 *BBCR4 MATERIAL WORLD: Q&A from listeners 1700-1800 *KMUW ECHOES OF XMAS 1800-1900 *KMUW MADRIGALIA`S XMAS WITH HARP & VOICE 2000-2030 *BBCR4 70s, THE DECADE OF SELF-DOUBT 2000-2100 *KPBX THIRD COAST INTERNATIONAL AUDIO FESTIVAL, part 2 2030-2100 *BBCWe HERITAGE: Preserving Herculaneum 2100-2130 *BBCR4 COSTING THE EARTH: Aluminium smelter in Iceland vs wildlife 2106-2130 *BBCWa LIFE & TIMES OF THE MOBILE PHONE, 2 of 2 2200-2400 *BBCR3 PROMS 2002: Piazzolla, Falla, Ginastera et al. UT FRI JANUARY 3 FRIDAYS St. Genevieve; Burkina Faso National Day 0100-0200 *WLRN 2002 ADVENT CONCERT BY NATIONAL LUTHERAN CHOIR 0200-0300 *WLRN ECHOES OF XMAS, Dale Warland Singers 0230-0300 *BBCWS HERITAGE: Preserving Herculaneum 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: the craft of the historian 0400-0500 *YPR CITY ARTS: Studs Terkel & Bud Trillin 1305-1345 *BBCWe OUTLOOK: Studs Terkel 1330-1400 *BBCR4 A WORLD IN YOUR EAR: Storytelling from S Africa to Hawaii [last of current series; repeats Sun 2000 {NOT}] 1506-1530 *BBCWa LIFE & TIMES OF THE MOBILE PHONE, 2 of 2 1530-1600 *BBCWe HERITAGE: Preserving Herculaneum 1530-1600 *KUNM UNIVERSITY SHOWCASE: Taos Summer Writer`s Conference 1600-1630 *BBCR4 WORD OF MOUTH: Atishoo of lies: language of common cold 1600-1700 *BBCR3 JAZZ LEGENDS: Ellington: Black, Brown, Beige 1600-XXXX *KMUW HANDEL`S MESSIAH, ROBERT SHAW CONDUCTING 1906-1959 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: top science stories 2002 2200-2230 *BBCR2 UP FRONT: Mel Torme & Artie Shaw 2200-2200 Scandinavian Weekend Radio, Finland, monthly 24 hours 2330-2400 *BBCR4 ENTERTAINING THE TROOPS from WW I to the Gulf UT SAT JANUARY 4 SATURDAYS St. Elizabeth Seton Myanmar Independence Day 0000-xxxx *WHRB JACKSON FAMILY ORGY, resumes at 2230- 0000-2200 Scandinavian Weekend Radio, Finland, monthly 24 hours concludes 0100-0200 *WLRN XMAS WITH PHILADELPHIA SINGERS 0100-0300 *CBCR2 IN PERFORMANCE: Maza Meze, Middle Eastern music 0200-0300 *WLRN XMAS FESTIVAL FROM CONCORDIA COLLEGE MN 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSNION 720: Radio and religion 1300-1400 *BBCR3 WORLD ROUTES: from Vietnam, 2 of 2 [1 of 2 says 1/4 list!] 1505-1530 *CBCR1 WINNIPEG COMEDY FESTIVAL: PRIME MINISTERS [+1/2/3/4h] 1530-1600 *CBCR1 ROOTS MUSIC CANADA 1 of 3 [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1800-1830 *BBCR3 JAZZ FILE: more favourites of R. Crumb 1800-1900 *BBC7 ASIMOV`S FOUNDATION TRILOGY 3 of 8 [rpt 2400; 4 on Sun] 1955-2015 *BBCR3 MET OPERA QUIZ time approx., also US net, CBCR2, etc. 2000-2100 *BBCR4 SWING, AT THE BBC 2100-2200 *WHYY MIDEAST: A CENTURY OF CONFLICT 2100-2200 *BBCR4 CLASSIC SERIAL: Huck Finn, 3 of ? 2205-2230 *BBCWe COMPOSERS OF THE MONTH: Padilla & Salazar begin 2230-2300 *BBCWe MUSIC REVIEW: Flamenco 2215-2300 *BBCR4 CHEERING UP BRITANNIA: best place to live 2230-XXXX *WABE Cradle and Crucible: History and Faith in the Middle East 2230-2345 *WHRB JACKSON FAMILY ORGY CONTINUES, and resumes 0230- 2300-2330 *BBCR4 ROUND BRITAIN QUIZ new series UT SUN JANUARY 5 SUNDAYS Lithuania presidential elections 0000-0100 *BBC7 ASIMOV`S FOUNDATION TRILOGY 3 of 8 [4 on Mon] 0000-0200 *BBCWS PLAY OF THE WEEK: Waiting for Godot [note length] 0200-0300 *WBEZ PERFORMANCE SPACE debut: Chicago Jazz Fest [rpt Mon 0500] 0200-0300 *WQXR CHAMBER MUSIC FROM KOSCIUSZKO FOUNDATION: XIV carols 0200-0300 *WOIa FIRST PERSON SPEAKING OF FAITH: Children and God 0230-XXXX *WHRB JACKSON FAMILY ORGY -1130? 0400-0500 *WHYY AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Musical tales of the Peace Corps 0400-XXXX *NPRN LATE IN THE EVENING HOLIDAY PARTY: music for New Year 0430-XXXX *KING THE GRAND TRADITION: Caruso, 1 of 2 0700-1200 HCJB Australia, first broadcast, 11755 1130-1600 *WHRB MILLS BROTHERS ORGY 1230-1300 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: temperance 1330-1400 *BBCR4 THREE MILES AN HOUR: HISTORY OF WALKING: Werner Herzog 1335-1350 *RHC Look for EN CONTACTO, Spanish DX Program 1600-1700 *BBCWS CONCERT HALL: Flamenco, from Proms 1700-1740 *BBCR4 THE HUNT: Fox hunt master fears parliamentary ban 1700-1745 *BBCR3 DISCOVERING MUSIC: Schubert`s String Quartet, d, `Death and the Maiden` [performed at 2220] 1730-0300 *WHRB SERGEY DIAGHILEV & BALLETS RUSSES orgy into UT Tue! 1800-1900 *KUNM Feminisms: the price of safety 1800-1900 *BBC7 ASIMOV`S FOUNDATION TRILOGY 4 of 8 [rpt 2400] 1800-2000 *WCPN JAZZ TRACKS: year in review 1805-1900 *CBCR2 THE SINGER AND THE SONG: Mezzos (Mezze?) 1805-2000 *BBCWe PLAY OF THE WEEK: Waiting for Godot 2000-2100 *RCSPf AUDIÇÃO ESPECIAL: KRONOS QUARTET - PEÇAS DA ÁFRICA 2030-2100 *BBCR4 WORD OF MOUTH: Language of the common cold 2100-2200 *RCSPf TERRA BRASILIS - O instrumental brasileiro 2100-2200 *KQED CITY ARTS & LECTURES: Dave Barry 2100-2400 *BBC7 GOODBYE, SPIKE MILLIGAN: tribute 2105-2200 *CBCR2 SAY IT WITH MUSIC: Patinkin sings Sondheim 2130-2200 *BBCR4 IN BUSINESS: Thomas Kinkade, world`s richest artist 2155/2215 *RHC Look for EN CONTACTO, Spanish DX Program 2220-2300 *BBCR3 SCHUBERT: String Quartet, d, D. 810 [see 1700] 2330-2400 *BBCR4 SOMETHING UNDERSTOOD: clowns, jesters, fools UT MON JANUARY 6 MONDAYS RCC Epiphany Iraq Army's Day; Laos Pathet Lao Day 0000-0100 *BBC7 ASIMOV`S FOUNDATION TRILOGY 4 of 8 [Sat/Sun/UT Mon] 0000-XXXX *WFCR THIRD COAST INTERNATIONAL RADIO FESTIVAL 1 of 2 0000-2400 *WHRB SERGEY DIAGHILEV & BALLETS RUSSES orgy into UT Tue 0200-0300 *WNYCf MAD ABOUT MUSIC monthly: Felix Rohatyn 0400-0415 tvTOON SPACE GHOST COAST TO COAST, ex-0445 0500-0600 *WBEZ PERFORMANCE SPACE debut: Chicago Jazz Fest [rpt of Sun 0200 0500] 0500-0600 *WYSO NATURE`S REVENGE: Louisiana`s Vanishing Wetlands 0500-1000 WBZ 1030 Boston STEVE LeVEILLE: Old Time Radio; Lone Ranger [2-204] 0530-0630 *KUNM RADIO THEATER: Stone Soup, Sonic Force, Dakota Reader 1600-1630 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Temperance 1830-1900 *BBCR4 JUST A MINUTE: New series starts 1905-1930 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: Spain`s Golden Age: Cervantes 1930-2130 *BBCR3 PROMS 2002: Haydn 96, Bruckner 4 2000-2030 *BBCR4 IT`S MY STORY: Dumbstruck 2030-2100 *BBCR4 CROSSING CONTINENTS: Afghanistan 2100-2130 *BBCR4 NATURE: Green Golf UT TUE JANUARY 7 TUESDAYS Ethiopian, Egyptian, Eastern Orthodox Xmas St. Raymond Cambodia Victory Day Over Genocidal Regime 0000-0300 *WHRB SERGEY DIAGHILEV & BALLETS RUSSES ORGY concludes 0100-0200 *KGOU THE MIDEAST: A CENTURY OF CONFLICT 0105-0130 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: Spain`s Golden Age: Cervantes 0300-0400 *WHYY JUSTICE TALKING: Legalizing prostitution 0300-1300 *WHRB THE ELEPHANT SIX ORGY, recording label 0400-0500 *KQED WORLD AFFAIRS COUNCIL: Ideas That Conquered the World: Peace, Democracy and Free Markets in the 21st Century Tonight's speaker is Michael Mandelbaum 1300-0300 *WHRB ABBEY LINCOLN ORGY blues 1330-1400 *BBCR3 DISTANT CHORDS: music of immigrants in Britain; 1: Armenian 1405-1430 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: Spain`s Golden Age: Cervantes 1706-1800 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: The Computer Guys 1900-2000 *BBCR2 various music series: see DAY 2030-2100 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: Shark`s domain: Perth, Australia 2030-2130 *BBCR2 PETER COOK & DUDLEY MOORE, 2 of 2 supposedly, but 2030-2130 *BBCR2 JAILHOUSE ROCK, 1 of 2 shown in today`s whatson! 2230-2300 *KCRW DESIGN AND ARCHITECTURE monthly UT WED JANUARY 8 WEDNESDAYS St. Severinus 0000-0300 *WHRB ABBEY LINCOLN ORGY blues, concludes 0230-0300 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: Shark`s domain: Perth, Australia 0300-0700 *WHRB KICK BACK AND GROOVE ORGY 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: IRAQ: the view from two `realists` [more E720 listings to be added] 0330-0430 *KALW MY FAVORITE THINGS monthly 0400-0500 *KQED CITY ARTS & LECTURES: Dave Barry 0500-0500 CHWO 740 Toronto 2nd anniversary, special QSL [2-204] 0700-1300 *WHRB JOHN CAGE RADIO PIECES ORGY 1300-2345 *WHRB VLADIMIR HOROWITZ ORGY piano [resumes Thu 1300] 1530-1600 *KUNM THE BIONEERS: The Duh Principle: better safe than sorry 1530-1600 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: Shark`s Domain, Perth, Australia 1600-1700 *BBCR3 EPIPHANY[non] CAROL SERVICE from Cambridge, live 1630-xxxx V. of Southern Azerbaijan, new cland debut, 9570, also Thu [3-004] 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: North Korea 2000-2030 *RFPI WINGS: Your Revolution Is Banned: The KBOO Case 2000-2045 *BBCR4 CHEERING UP BRITANNIA debate: Happiness first? 2005-2030 *BBCWe DISCOVERY: WHAT REMAINS TO BE DISCOVERED? 2100-2130 *BBCR4 WHAT REMAINS TO BE DISCOVERED? Secret of life UT THU JANUARY 9 THURSDAYS Bd. Gregory X 0000-0500 CHWO 740 Toronto 2nd anniversary concludes, special QSL [2-204] 0100-0230 tvPBS SANDWICHES THAT YOU WILL LIKE [time varies] 0200-0230 *RFPI WINGS: Your Revolution Is Banned: The KBOO Case [+6/12h] 0200-1300 *WHRB ALI AKBAR KHAN ORGY 0205-0230 *BBCWS DISCOVERY: WHAT REMAINS TO BE DISCOVERED? 0400-0500 *KQED ALTERNATIVE RADIO: MLK 1967 speech: Beyond Vietnam 0406-0459 *WPR CONNECTION: Dr. Chaos 1300-0300 *WHRB VLADIMIR HOROWITZ ORGY piano 1505-1530 *BBCWe DISCOVERY: What remains to be discovered 1530-1600 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: Sonia, the Shanghai spy 1600-1700 *BBCR3 MUSIC RESTORED: Dresden tradition: Bach, Praetorius, Schuetz 1606-1659 *NPR/WAMU DIANE REHM: Fasttalk % 1630-xxxx V. of Southern Azerbaijan, new cland debut, 9570, [3-004] [also Wed, but no-show] 1630-1700 *BBCR4 MATERIAL WORLD: miniature battery running on bodily fluids 1700-1900 *WFUV UNDER THE COVERS: Joan Baez 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Founder of the Raelian Movement 1906-1959 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Doctors on strike % 2000-2030 *BBCR4 DECADE OF SELF-DOUBT: 70s, from Heath to Thatcher 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Boheme on Broadway % 2100-2130 *BBCR4 COSTING THE EARTH: Naming all creatures in next 25 years 2100-2200 *BBCR2 ROCKIN` WITH SUZIE Q: Phil Everley, last of series 2105-2130 *BBCWa DISCOVERY: What remains to be discovered 2130-2200 *BBCR3 NIGHT WAVES: Martin Scorsese UT FRI JANUARY 10 FRIDAYS St. Aldo Benin People's Day Djibouti parliamentary elections 0000-0100 *WMNR MARIO LANZA & FRIENDS weekly 0000-0300 *WHRB VLADIMIR HOROWITZ ORGY piano [resumes at 1300] 0005-0015 *KUSC Mendelssohn: Hebrides Overture = Fingal`s Cave 0030-XXXX *WABE The Reckoning: Iraq and the Legacy of Saddam Hussein 0100-0300 *WUOT WORLD CHORAL SPECTACULAR, continues 17, 24, 31 0200-XXXX *YPR WHAT`S HAPPENING IN HELENA, 1 of ? weekly 0230-0300 *BBCWa THE WAY WE ARE in Britain, 1 of 6 0300-1300 *WHRB PUNK AGAINST THE WAR ORGY [resumes Sat 0230] 0406-0500 *WHYY BEEN THERE, DONE THAT 0600-0800 WTAM 1100 Cleveland was off last night around this time, and some DXers including Jim Renfrew, NY, heard R. Globo, Brasil 1300-2345 *WHRB VLADIMIR HOROWITZ ORGY piano, concludes 1505-1530 *BBCWa DISCOVERY: What remains to be discovered, 4 parts 1530-1600 *KUNM FRIDAY FORUM: Morris Dees, SPLC 1530-1600 *BBCWe THE WAY WE ARE in Britain 1600-1700 *BBCR3 JAZZ LEGENDS: Coltrane Quartet 1800-1830 *RFPI WINGS: Your Revolution Is Banned: The KBOO Case 2030-2100 *BBCWe INSIDE THE GLOBAL GIANTS 2130-2200 *BBCWa THE WAY WE ARE in Britain, 6 parts 2200-2230 *BBCR2 UP FRONT: Sarah Vaughan & Billy Eckstine 2307-2400 *WPR MEDIA TALK: Why conservatives dominate AM talk radio UT SAT JANUARY 11 SATURDAYS Unity Day in Nepal; St. Hyginus Morocco Celebration of the declaration of independence Nepal National Unity Day Albania Republic Day 0000-0030 *RFPI WINGS: Your Revolution Is Banned: The KBOO Case [+6/12h] 0100-0200 *WOIa THIS AMERICAN LIFE: Secret Government: Jose Padilla, et al. 0100-0200 tvSCI FARSCAPE final season begins, 1 of 11 [also 0500] 0200-0400 tvA&E NOBEL PEACE CONCERT: Jimmy Carter`s favorites 0230-0300 *BBCWS INSIDE THE GLOBAL GIANTS, 5 parts 0230-1400 *WHRB PUNK AGAINST THE WAR ORGY resumes 0300-0311 *KUSC MICHAEL ABELS: GLOBAL WARMING [music] 0306-0400 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Venezuela in crisis 0400-0600 *KBYUf DETROIT SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA: Schubert, Barber, Brahms 0500-0600 *KUNM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Musical tales from the Peace Corps [show has many airings on other stations; see PRF] 0500-0600 tvSCI FARSCAPE final season begins, 1 of 11 [also 0100] 0600-0800 tvA&E NOBEL PEACE CONCERT: Jimmy Carter`s favorites 1330-1400 *BBCWa MUSIC FEATURE: Cairo nights: Arab classical music 1505-1530 *CBCR1 WINNIPEG COMEDY FESTIVAL Jan [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1530-1600 *CBCR1 ROOTS MUSIC CANADA 2 of 3 [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1605-1700 *CBCR1 QUIRKS & QUIRKS: Autism epidemic 1830-2120 *BBCR3 MET OPERA: Die Fledermaus [+CBCR2, US and other nets] 1900-2000 *WOIa THIS AMERICAN LIFE: Secret Government: Jose Padilla, et al. 1925-1950 *BBCR3 MET Interval I: Frank Stella; US & Canada: Opera News OTA? 2000-2100 *BBCR4 ARCHIVE HOUR: history of debating on air 2000-2100 *KQED THIS AMERICAN LIFE: Secret government 2000-2100 *WLRN SHE GOT GAME: Still Breaking Barriers 2050-2115 *BBCR3 MET Interval II: Opera Quiz [times approx.] 2100-2200 *BBCR2 SUPERSTAR DJs 2100-2200 *BBCR4 CLASSIC SERIAL: Barry Lyndon, 1 of ? 2100-2200 *KQED SHADES OF GRAY: Abortion issue 2200-2230 *KQED SOUNDPRINT: McDonaldization of Hong Kong 2200-2425 *WFUV MIXED BAG: A whiter shade of Motown 2215-2300 *BBCR4 CHEERING UP BRITAIN 2230-2300 *BBCWe MUSIC REVIEW: Flamenco 2230-XXXX *WABE The Reckoning: Iraq and the Legacy of Saddam Hussein 2230-1600 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY, first of many parts 2300-2400 *KNAU THIS AMERICAN LIFE: Secret government, also KNPR UT SUN JANUARY 12 SUNDAYS Turkmenistan Remembrance Day Tanzania Celebration of the Zanzibar Revolution Montenegro presidential elections 0000-1600 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY, first part concludes; thru 0300 UT Sat! 0100-0300 *WCNY Choral Traditions with Bonnie Beth Derby: THE FRENCH CONNECTION: WIDOR, VIERNE AND DURUFLE 0100-0415 *CBCR1 THE BIG BANDS ARE BACK gala concert [+1/2/3 hours] 0200-0300 *WBEZ Performance Space: Tenor saxophone legend Von Freeman 0200-0300 *WSUI THIS AMERICAN LIFE: Secret government, also on NWPRn 0200-0300 *WOIa FIRST PERSON SPEAKING OF FAITH: the problem of evil 0200-0400 *KBYU DW[?] SALZBURG FESTIVAL 2002 season begins 0200-0430 *KGNU AMY GOODMAN SOLD-OUT SPEECH IN BOULDER, LIVE 0230-0300 *BBCWa MUSIC REVIEW: Sevilla 0300-0400 *WOIa PRAIRIE LIGHTS: Sen. John McCain reads his `Worth Fighting For` 0300-0400 *WFPL THIS AMERICAN LIFE: Secret government 0400-0500 *WUTC THIS AMERICAN LIFE: Secret government 0430-0500 *KING THE GRAND TRADITION: Caruso, 2 of 2 0500-0600 tvCNBC THE BIG HEIST: HOW AOL TOOK TIME-WARNER 1230-1300 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: the pomegranate 1330-1400 *BBCR4 THREE MILES AN HOUR: history of walking, continues 1500-1600 *BBCR4 CLASSIC SERIAL: Barry Lyndon, 2 of ? 1600-1630 *BBCR4 OPEN BOOK: best new travel writing 1700-1740 *BBCR4 SEEDS OF TROUBLE: GM food industry, 1 of 2 1700-1745 *BBCR3 DISCOVERING MUSIC: Monteverdi madrigals 1700-1800 *KGOU BBC CHANGING WORLD: Body Trade, 1 & 2 of 4 1720- *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY resumes, thru 0300 UT Sat u.o.s. 1740-1755 *BBCR4 FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS OF BUDDHISM: 1, Suffering 1745-1830 *BBCR3 SUNDAY FEATURE: Black London 1800-1900 *KUNM MEETING OF MINDS: Moral Integrity, call-in 2100-2200 *WFPL THIS AMERICAN LIFE: Secret government 2105-2200 *CBCR2 SAY IT WITH MUSIC: Hairspray 2200-2300 *KQED ON THE MEDIA: Al Franken, why no liberal Limbaughs? 2200-2400 *WFUV AMERICAN ROUTES: Elvis remembered 25 years after death 2230-2300 *BBCR3 BETWEEN THE EARS: Tramuntana wind of Catalunya 2300-2400 *WBEZ NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Mario Cuomo 2330-2400 *BBCR3 SOMETHING UNDERSTOOD: In praise of cities UT MON JANUARY 13 MONDAYS National Holiday in Togo; St. Hilary Japan Coming of Age Day (Seijin no hi) Togo Freedom Day 0000-2400 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY continues 0000-XXXX *WFCR THIRD COAST INTERNATIONAL RADIO FESTIVAL 2 of 2 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILES: Joycelyn Elders, former Surgeon General 0030-0100 *KQED CAMBRIDGE FORUM: Why Terrorism Works, Alan Dershowitz 0100-0200 *WBEZ BUILT IN CHICAGO: Architecture, Soldier Field, etc. 0100-0300 *WFIU CHANGING WORLD: The Young in China, BBC 0100-0300 *WFMU TRANSPACIFIC SOUND PARADISE: Greek & Balkan music 0200-0300 *KUSP ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Howard Zinn 0500-0600 *WBEZ Performance Space: Tenor saxophone legend Von Freeman 0500-0600 tvCNBC THE BIG HEIST: HOW AOL TOOK TIME-WARNER 0600-0700 *KQED TECH NATION: Kevin Mitnick 0800-0900 tvCNBC THE BIG HEIST: HOW AOL TOOK TIME-WARNER 1350-1400 *KOSU GOVERNOR`S REPORT CARD: Frosty & Neva grade Keating 1405-1430 *BBCWa MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: the art of fireworks, NY celebrations 1506-1559 *NPR/WAMU DIANE REHM: Anti-war Movement % 1506-1559 *WPRi THE CONNEXION: Chinese dissident Xu Wen-li 1530-1600 *BBCWa THE WAY WE ARE in Britain, 6 parts 1532-1600 *CBCR1 OUTFRONT: Lessons from the Trans-Canada Hiway [+1/2/3/4 hours] [not 1505-1530 as per CBC program info] 1600-1630 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Pomegranates 1600-1700 *BBCR3 STAGE & SCREEN: Elaine Stritch 1700-XXXX *KGOU INAUGURATION OF OK GOVERNOR BRAD HENRY live 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: State of the World, Worldwatch Institute % 1800-1830 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 1 of 5 thru Fri, +repeats 2400 1800-XXXX *KOSU INAUGURATION OF OK GOVERNOR BRAD HENRY live 1905-1930 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: the art of fireworks, NY celebrations 1906-1959 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: `Creative Destruction,` radical Islam 2000-2030 *BBCR4 IT`S MY STORY: The Flight of Tiny Feet: children escaping Japanese occupation of Burma 2100-2130 *BBCR4 NATURE: Britain as a winter bird refuge 2100-2200 *OPB CHAUTAUQUA LECTURES: Incredible world of bats 2130-2200 *BBCWa INSIDE THE GLOBAL GIANTS, 5 parts 2200-0100 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY: historic performances UT TUE JANUARY 14 TUESDAYS St. Felix of Nola 0000-0030 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 1 of 5 thru Sat, repeats of 1800 0000-0100 *WFMU JONESVILLE STATION: Chuck Barris, Joe Franklin 0000-0200 *WUMB AMERICAN ROUTES: Remembering Elvis 0000-2400 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY continues including Historic Perfomrances -0100 0100-XXXX *KGOU INAUGURATION OF OK GOVERNOR BRAD HENRY replay 0100-0300 tvA&E BENEDICT ARNOLD: A QUESTION OF HONOR [+2/4/6 hours] 0105-0130 *BBCWS MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: the art of fireworks, NY celebrations 0206-0259 *Mich THE CONNEXION: Chinese dissident Xu Wen-li 0300-0400 *KBYUf FAMILY THEATRE: BURNS & ALLEN: Gracie for President 0306-0359 *WPRi THE CONNEXION: Chinese dissident Xu Wen-li 1330-1400 *BBCR4 DISTANT CHORDS: Kiribati women 1405-1430 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art of fireworks 1500-1600 *WCLV ADVENTURES IN GOOD MUSIC: Name the composer 1530-1600 *BBCWa INSIDE THE GLOBAL GIANTS 1600-1700 *BBCR3 VOICES: Régine Crespin 1600-1700 *KUNI GOVERNOR`S CONDITION OF THE STATE ADDRESS, Iowa, live 1606-1659 *NPR/WAMU DIANE REHM: The Chinese discovery of America in 1421 % 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Impact of Latin America on the World % 1706-1759 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Future of Wireless [and they don`t mean SW] % 1800-1830 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 2 of 5 thru Fri, +repeats 2400 1900-2230 *BBCR2 various music series: see DAY 2000-2040 *BBCR4 SEEDS OF TROUBLE: is GM farming reckless? [Rpt Sun 1700] 2005-2030 *BBCWa MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art of fireworks 2030-2100 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: Bell-ringing 2030-2130 *BBCR2 JAILHOUSE ROCK, 2 of 2 2200-2300 *WMNR ADVENTURES IN GOOD MUSIC: name the composer, monthly quiz UT WED JANUARY 15 WEDNESDAYS St. Paul the Hermit Czech Republic presidential elections Malawi John Chilibwe Day 0000-0030 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 2 of 5 thru Sat, repeats of 1800 0000-2400 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY continues 0100-0300 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY: Historic performances 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: LEGENDS: AN INUIT JOURNEY [+1/2/3/4h] 0230-0300 *BBCWS OMNIBUS: Bell-ringing 0230-XXXX *KUSP TALK OF THE BAY: Cruise ships and Monterey Bay 0300-xxxx *WOIa GOVERNOR`S STATE OF THE STATE ADDRESS, Iowa 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Rise & Fall of the British Empire 1430-XXXX *FCC OPEN MEETING http://www.fcc.gov/realaudio/ [3-008] 1530-1600 *KUNM BIONEERS: Wonders of Gaia: nature is symbiotic 1530-1600 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: Bell-ringing 1800-1830 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 3 of 5 thru Fri, +repeats 2400 2000-XXXX *KUSP STATE OF THE ARTS 2130-2200 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: Bell-ringing 2200-2230 *BBCR2 BHANGRA & BEYOND: History of Asian music in Britain, 1 of 4 % 2315-0300 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY: Historic performances UT THU JANUARY 16 THURSDAYS St. Marcellus I El Salvador Peace Agreement 0000-0030 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 3 of 5 thru Sat, repeats of 1800 0000-0300 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY: Historic performances, continues 0100-XXXX *XM104 Trans Aural Express: The Mediaeval Baebes: Sumptuous, sensual and soothing, the heavenly voices of the Mediaeval Baebes will enchant your ears as they borrow lyrical material from medieval prose and find inspiration in medieval music. [NOT: apparently the webcast versions are only samples of each channel, not what is actually on satellite, per the previews, so will desume listing here] 0300-1300 *WHRB KARP/BEHEAD THE PROPHET/TIGHT BROS. ORGY 0400-0500 *KQED WE WERE HERE: Honoring MLK Jr., 1 of 2 [2 = tomorrow] 1300-0300 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY continues 1530-1600 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: Bell-ringing 1600-1700 *BBCR3 MUSIC RESTORED: Antonio Stradivari 1630-1700 *BBCR4 MATERIAL WORLD: Food proteins and diseases such as Alzheimer`s 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Scott Carpenter, astronaut, space explorer 1800-1830 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 4 of 5 thru Fri, +repeats 2400 1806-1900 *KQED FORUM: Politics of anti-war movements 1906-1959 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: A look at protesting, anti-war % 2000-2030 *BBCR4 THE DARK ORIGINS OF BRITAIN, 1 of 3 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Leonardo da Vinci % 2100-2130 *BBCR4 COSTING THE EARTH: has the problem of acid rain been solved? 2100-2200 *BBCR2 SHAKE, RATTLE & ROLL, new series, 1 of 17 UT FRI JANUARY 17 FRIDAYS Constitution Day in the Philippines Liberation Day in Poland; St. Anthony Congo DR Day of National Hero, Patrice-Emery Lumumba 0000-0030 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 4 of 5 thru Sat, repeats of 1800 0000-0300 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY continues 0100-0300 *WUOT WORLD CHORAL SPECTACULAR, continues 24, 31 0100-0312 *WRRf NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: Wagner, R. Strauss 0300-1130 *WHRB KARP/BEHEAD THE PROPHET/TIGHT BROS. ORGY 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Night at the Field Museum 0400-0500 *KQED WE WERE HERE: Honoring MLK Jr., 2 of 2 0400-0500 *WHYY BEEN THERE, DONE THAT: exploring borders around us 1130-0300 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY concludes 1600-1630 *BBCR4 WORD OF MOUTH: XXI Century babble-on, cellphones, etc. 1600-1700 *BBCR3 JAZZ LEGENDS: John Kirby, bass 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Journalists and war % 1800-1830 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 5 of 5 thru Fri, +repeats 2400 1900-2000 *KVNF ROCKY MOUNTAIN ENVIRONMENTAL RADIO 1900-2130 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY: historic performances, Beethoven the man 2000-2130 *BBCR3 LIVE FROM THE BARBICAN: Momentum: The Music Of Mark-Anthony Turnage: Blood On The Floor 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: Einstein, cosmology. c 2200-2230 *BBCR2 MR. TEA FROM TEXAS: Jazz immortal Jack Teagarden 1 of 4 2215-2330 *BBCR3 ANDY KERSHAW: at the Timbuktu music festival UT SAT JANUARY 18 SATURDAYS St. Prisca 0000-0030 *BBC7 DR. WHO: Paradise of death, 5 of 5, repeat of 1800 0000-0300 *WHRB BEETHOVEN ORGY concludes 0100-0300 *CBCR2 IN PERFORMANCE: The Caledonian flute 0150-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Cracking the `code of life`, human genome project 0300-1400 *WHRB RECORD HOSPTIAL ORGY 0400-0500 *KQED COMMONWEALTH CLUB: Catherine Crier: case against lawyers 0405-0430 *BBCWS BRAIN OF BRITAIN: FINAL 0435-0605 tvABC VIEWPOINT: Patriotism, Journalism & War [instead of Nightline and Up Close, whose final week is upcoming] [original live airtime in ET/CT zones] 0500-0600 *KUNM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Music mercado em Salvador da Bahia 1300-1330 *BBCR2 COMEDIAN`S COMEDIANS, new series 1300-1510 *BBCR3 MOMENTUM: Music of Turnage 1330-1400 *BBCWa THE GLOBAL MUSIC MACHINE 1530-1600 *CBCR1 ROOTS MUSIC CANADA 3 of 3 [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1600-2000 *WBAI VOICES OF SOLIDARITY: Anti-war march on Washington [3-009] [also on tvCSPAN 1] and RFPI 15039 1800-2200 *BBCR3 MET OPERA: Carmen [also US, Canada nets; note early start] 1900-1925 *MET INTERMISSION FEATURE: Opera News on the air? [time apx.] 1945-2000 *BBCR3 FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS OF BUDDHISM: 1) 2000-2100 *WLRN FIRST PERSON SPEAKING OF FAITH: Spirituality & Sexuality 2000-2100 *BBCR4 ARCHIVE HOUR: Ireland`s hugely popular Gay Byrne Show 2000-2100 *WPRi SAVVY TRAVELER: Live from St Paul! 2005-2025 *BBCR3 MET INTERVAL: Opera quiz [time approx.] 2005-2030 *BBCWS BRAIN OF BRITAIN: finale 2100-2200 *BBCR2 PURPLE REIGN: The Prince Story, 1 of 2 2100-2200 *BBCR4 CLASSIC SERIAL: Barry Lyndon, 2 of 2 2100-2200 *KQED WE WERE HERE: MLK special 2230-0300 *WHRB HECTOR BERLIOZ ORGY begins UT SUN JANUARY 19 SUNDAYS Cuba legislative `elections` Lao People's Dem. Rep. Army's Day Turkmenistan National Day 0000-0300 *WHRB HECTOR BERLIOZ ORGY continues 0030-xxxx KM1CC MARCONI 100th ANNIVERSARY SPECIAL [+1/2 hours][3-010] 3885 AM, 7260 LSB, 14260 USB +/- 10; also CW earlier 0100-XXXX *XM150 Stand Up, Sit Down with Charles Fleischer: Host Joel Haas gets inside the head of comic, actor and voice talent Charles Fleischer. Hear about all the stars he's worked with and how he played harmonica with Blues Traveler [probably not -- see Jan 16, but one more try in case] 0200-0300 *WOIa FIRST PERSON SPEAKING OF FAITH: Spirit of Islam 0306-0516 *KCSCf NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: Wagner, R. Strauss 1100-1600 *WHRB HECTOR BERLIOZ ORGY continues 1230-1300 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Blood 1305-1325 *RN SINCERELY YOURS: RN cuts? 5965 1305-1330 *BBCWe BRAIN OF BRITAIN: final 1311-1400 *CBCR1 SUNDAY EDITION: Global politics, peace march [+1/2/3/4 h] 1330-1400 *BBCR4 THE ROMAN WAY: 1) Life on the northern edge 1400-1600 *BBCR3 MOMENTUM: new and old music by Turnage, live from Barbican 1438-1458 *RN SINCERELY YOURS: RN cuts? 15220 1505-1600 *CBCR1 SUNDAY EDITION: Amazing Grace, hymn`s impact [+1/2/3/4 h] 1600-1700 *BBCWS CONCERT HALL: Revueltas, Gershwin 1700-1740 *BBCR4 SEEDS OF TROUBLE: Doubts about GM food, Monsanto 1700-1745 *BBCR3 DISCOVERING MUSIC: Britten`s variations OATO Frank Bridge 1700-1800 *KGOU BBC CHANGING WORLD: Body Trade, 3 & 4 of 4 1730-0300 *WHRB HECTOR BERLIOZ ORGY continues 1740-1755 *BBCR4 FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS OF BUDDHISM: 2) Suffering 1745-1830 *BBCR3 SUNDAY FEATURE: Legacy of Joan Littlewood 1800-1900 *KUNM SAGE HEALTH: New frontiers for oriental medicine, call-in 1805-1900 *CBCR2 THE SINGER AND THE SONG: Grammy nominees 1830-2145 *BBCR3 MOMENTUM: new and old music by Turnage, live from Barbican 2000-2200 *WABE MLK SPECIAL: We Were Here 2030-2100 *BBCR4 WORD OF MOUTH: XXI Century babble 2100-2200 *KQED CITY ARTS & LECTURES: Joan Didion 2105-2300 *CBCR1 CROSS COUNTRY CHECKUP: Judging leaders, BC premier [live] 2130-2200 *BBCR4 IN BUSINESS: Cry for Argentina 2200-2300 *WYSO SHADES OF GRAY: Balanced look at abortion 2300-2330 *CBCR1 WORLD THIS WEEKEND: war in southern Sudan [+1/2/3 h] 2300-2400 *WBEZ SHADES OF GRAY: balanced look at abortion 2335-2355 *RN SINCERELY YOURS: RN cuts? 9845 6165 UT MON JANUARY 20 MONDAYS St. Fabian [more holidays to be added] 0000-0100 *WBEZ SPEAKING OF FAITH: The soul in depression 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILES: Anya Peterson Royce, renaissance woman 0000-0200 *WCLV MLK SPECIAL: Cleveland Orchestra concert live 0000-0200 *WCPN MLK SPECIAL: Cleveland Orchestra concert live 0000-0300 *WHRB HECTOR BERLIOZ ORGY continues 0100-0300 *WFIU CHANGING WORLD: The Body Trade, BBC 0100-XXXX *CAINAN WE WERE HERE: Celebrating Dr. MLK 0130-0300 *KBYU CONCERTS FROM TEMPLE SQUARE: Choirs from Latvia, Slovenia 0200-0300 *KUSP ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Howard Zinn: Artists in time of war 0300-0500 *KING DETROIT SO: MLK Special concert 0435-0455 *RN SINCERELY YOURS: RN cuts? 9590 6165 0500-0600 *WYSO SHADES OF GRAY: Balanced look at abortion 1100-0300 *WHRB HECTOR BERLIOZ ORGY concludes 1306-1400 *WPRi TOM CLARK: Douglas Gomery, Who Owns the Media? 1405-1430 *BBCWa MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 1 of 2 1500-1700 *WBEZ WE WERE HERE: MLK special 1600-1630 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Blood 1600-1700 *BBCR3 STAGE & SCREEN: Richard Rodgers tribute 1 of 2: with Hart 1700-1900 *KUNI MLK unBIRTHDAY SPECIAL: Celebrating the Past, Embracing the Future: Choral tribute 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Interracial Relations, Randall Kennedy % 1706-1759 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Abraham Salon, multi-religion character % 1706-1759 *WMUB TAVIS SMILEY: Coretta Scott King 1800-1930 *WPRi WISCONSIN TRIBUTE TO MLK, live from Capitol rotunda 1806-XXXX *NPRN THROUGH NATIVE EYES: KARL BODMER`S OTHER AMERICA lecture 1905-1930 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 1 of 2 2006-2100 *WBEZ TAVIS SMILEY SHOW: Coretta Scott King 2030-2100 *BBCR4 THE REAL PATRON SAINTS: Wales` wacky David 2100-2200 *OPB CHAUTAUQUA LECTURES: Ethics of global information UT TUE JANUARY 21 TUESDAYS St. Agnes 0000-0100 *WQXR MLK BIRTHDAY CONCERT from Harlem 0000-0300 *WHRB HECTOR BERLIOZ ORGY concludes 0100-XXXX *KGOU SHADES OF GRAY in the abortion issue 0100-XXXX *WABE A KING CELEBRATION: ASO, Morehouse & Spelman glee clubs 0105-0130 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 1 of 2 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: BUFFYWORLD, feminist icon? [+1/2/3/4h] 0230-0300 *KUSP GEEK SPEEK: Survival of the web creation industry 0300-0400 *KBYUf FAMILY THEATRE: The Whirlpool, Cape Cod Radio Mystery Theatre 0300-1100 *WHRB JANDEK ORGY, 1 of 3, same times Wed, Thu 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: The Influential 10% 0400-0500 *WUMB AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Concert extravaganza at Dakar 0406-0500 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Horatio Alger myth in America 1100-2000 *WHRB HERBERT HOWELLS ORGY, more tomorrow 1330-1400 *BBCR4 DISTANT CHORDS: Portuguese musicians in Britain 1405-1430 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 1 of 2 1405-1500 *CBCR1 SOUNDS LIKE CANADA: Whistler, BC, pre-Olympic town? [+1/2/3/4 h] 1506-1559 *NPR DIANE REHM: Persian Gulf military buildup % 1506-1559 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Noam Chomsky [repeat at 0306] 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Anthrax islands in USSR, Scotland % 1706-1759 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI TECH TUESDAY: Human-computer interaxion % 1706-1800 *KQED FORUM: The cruise industry, terminal at San Francisco? 1800-1900 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Sen. Ted Kennedy % 1806-1900 *KQED FORUM: Winslow Homer 1900-2230 *BBCR2 various music series: see DAY 2000-2040 *BBCR4 FILE ON FOUR: Drugs and crime in Britain`s Asian communities 2000-0300 *WHRB GUILLAUME DE MACHAUT ORGY 2005-2030 *BBCWa MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 1 of 2 2030-2100 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: Gay ballroom dancing 2030-2130 *BBCR2 MELLY`S JAZZ SHOWMEN: Louis Jordan and the Jive Talkers, 1 of 4 2130-2200 *BBCR2 HISTORY OF POP ARRANGING, new series 2230-2300 *KCRW DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE: what LA's new generation of architects is doing to improve the urban fabric of our community [so D&A is now 2-weekly or twice-monthly?] UT WED JANUARY 22 WEDNESDAYS St. Vincent Pallotti Netherlands legislative elections 0000-0300 *WHRB GUILLAUME DE MACHAUT ORGY concludes 0005-0100 *CBCR1 SOUNDS LIKE CANADA: Whistler, BC, pre-Olympic town? [+1/2/3/4 h] 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Terrorism, Law & Democracy, 1 of ? [+1/2/3/4 h] 0230-0300 *BBCWS OMNIBUS: Bell-ringing [supposedly, but see Tue 2030] 0300-1100 *WHRB JANDEK ORGY, 2 of 3 0306-0359 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Noam Chomsky 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: A Night at the Opera II, Sherill Milnes 0400-0500 *KQED CITY ARTS & LECTURES: Joan Didion 0505-0600 *NWPR FRESH AIR: Kevin Spacey 0505-0600 *WRVO FRESH AIR: Kevin Spacey 1100-1800 *WHRB HERBERT HOWELLS ORGY concludes 1405-1500 *WHRV FRESH AIR: Kevin Spacey? 1530-1600 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: Bell-ringing, supposedly 1700-1800 *WUOT SHADES OF GRAY: balanced look at abortion 1800-0200 *WHRB BSO PRINCIPALS ORGY 1915-1945 *BBCR4 FRONT ROW: Review of Polanski`s The Pianist 2000-2100 *BBCR2 MIKE HARDING: Celtic Connexions, live from Glasgow 2006-2100 *NPR TOTN: Iran: axis of evil or burgeoning democracy? % 2100-2130 *BBCR4 WHAT REMAINS TO BE DISCOVERED? Human mind 2130-2200 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: Gay ballroom dancing 2200-2230 *BBCR2 BHANGRA & BEYOND: History of Asian music in Britain, 2 of 4 UT THU JANUARY 23 THURSDAYS St. Emerenziana 0100-0200 *CBCR2 GREAT CANADIAN MUSIC DREAM: BC/Yukon 1 of 6 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: The Culture of Control: universal surveillance [+1/2/3/4h] 0200-XXXX *CBCR2 WOODY ALLEN`S NEW ORLEANS CLARINET, 1 of ? 0200-XXXX *KUNM LANNAN FOUNDATION: Tribute to Yeats, by Helen Vendler, poetry critic, live from the Lensic in Santa Fe [show pre-empted is 3 hours long; is this too?] 0300-1100 *WHRB JANDEK ORGY, 3 of 3 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: ``Let`s Go`` Globetrotting 0400-0500 *KQED RADIO SPECIAL: Hon. Lalit Mansingh, Ambassador of India 1100-0700 *WHRB SON & SKIP ORGY Delta Blues 1506-1600 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: high cost of Px drugs 1530-1600 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: Gay ballroom dancing 1600-1700 *BBCR3 MUSIC RESTORED: Conductor Roger Norrington 1606-1659 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: New biography of H. L. Mencken 1630-1700 *BBCR4 MATERIAL WORLD: measuring insect biodiversity, medical applications 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Anti-war movement, Gordon Clark % 1806-1900 *KQED FORUM: Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature 2000-2030 *BBCR4 THE DARK ORIGINS OF BRITAIN, 2 of 3: Scotland 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Role of luck in American life 2030-2100 *BBCR4 IN BUSINESS: Porn Again: on cutting edge of technology 2100-2130 *BBCR4 COSTING THE EARTH: Washing the war zone UT FRI JANUARY 24 FRIDAYS St. Francis de Sales 0000-0700 *WHRB SON & SKIP ORGY Delta Blues, concludes 0100-0300 *WUOT WORLD CHORAL SPECTACULAR, continues 31st 0100-0310 *KBYU NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: Wagner, R. Strauss 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Security & Risk, panel discussion [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0306-0400 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: high cost of Px drugs 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Globalization and its Discontents 0406-0459 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: New biography of H. L. Mencken 0700-1000 *WHRB FLASH GORDON ORGY 1000-2200 *WHRB MODERN JAZZ ORCHESTRA ORGY [more orgies to be added] 1400-XXXX *WMUB WMUB FORUM: NPR News Ombudsman Jeffrey Dvorkin [rpt 2400] 1530-1600 *KUNM BACKROADS RADIO: As Time Marches On 1600-1630 *BBCR4 WORD OF MOUTH: names of make-up products 1600-1700 *BBCR3 JAZZ LEGENDS: Art Pepper, sax 1606-1659 *NPR DIANE REHM: George Gershwin Alone, one-man play % 2215-2330 *BBCR3 ANDY KERSHAW: Music from Mali, 2 of 2 UT SAT JANUARY 25 SATURDAYS Robert Burns Day in Scotland 0000-XXXX *WMUB WMUB FORUM: NPR News Ombudsman Jeffrey Dvorkin 0000-0800 *WHRB OTIS REDDING ORGY concludes 0100-0300 *CBCR2 IN PERFORMANCE: Drive winter away: homage to Robbie Burns 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: The Question of Science: asking the right questions? [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-0300 *WCNY CINEMUSIC: Scott of the Antarctic 0300-XXXX *KING LIVE BY GEORGE: Pianist Randolph Hokanson, Northwest Pianist Recital Series, Esoterics, Brazilian Guitar Quartet,and members of the Northwest Chamber Orchestra chamber ensemble playing music by Spanish Composers 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: The frontiers of cosmology 0500-0600 *KUNM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Concert Extravaganza in Dakar 1300-1330 *BBCR2 COMEDIANS` COMEDIANS: Nichols & May, 1 of 6 1300-1400 *BBCR3 WORLD ROUTES: Kabul portion of BBCWS` 70th bash 1300-1800 *CBCR1 NDP LEADERSHIP CONVENTION live [timeshifted or not?] 1730-1750 *BBCR4 BACK ROW: films that go backwards in time 1800-1830 *BBCR3 JAZZ FILE: The Unknown Satchmo, from 2001y 1800-1900 *BBC7 CHILDHOOD`S END by Arthur C. Clarke 1 of 2 +Sun, rpt 2400 1915-1945 *BBCR3 MET INTERVAL 20[sic] MINUTES: New York Artists in Their Studios: Tim Marlow talks to Sean Scully, celebrated painter of stripes and grids; OPERA NEWS on US Net? 2000-2100 *WLRN ARW: NATURE`S REVENGE: Louisiana wetlands 2000-2100 *BBCR4 ARCHIVE HOUR: Great Gale: East coast floods of 1953 2035-2055 *BBCR3 MET OPERA QUIZ +US, other nets; times approx. 2100-2200 *BBCR2 PURPLE REIGN: The Prince Story, 2 of 2 2100-2200 *KQED STATE OF UNION: people`s accompaniment to Bush`s speech 2200-2355 *WFUV Mixed Bag with Pete Fornatale - 2nd anniversary on WFUV 2230-0230 *WHRB JIMI HENDRIX ORGY, resumes 0430- UT SUN JANUARY 26 SUNDAYS Republic Proclamation Day in India 0000-0100 *BBCWS PLAY OF THE WEEK: The Ministry Of Performing Arts And Crafts: Political satire set in a government minister's office on a Caribbean island, by the Trinidadian playwright Mustapha Matura 0000-0100 *BBC7 CHILDHOOD`S END by Arthur C. Clarke 1 of 2 +Mon 0000-0230 *WHRB JIMI HENDRIX ORGY continues, resumes 0430- 0200-0300 *KUNM EAR TO THE GROUND: Best of the Blues in KUNM Ladies` Bathroom 0200-0330 *WQXR ON WINGS OF SONG: Opera composers, Grace Bumbry et al. 0230-0430 *WHRB TECH ORGY electronic mayhem 0430-1600 *WHRB JIMI HENDRIX ORGY resumes 0706-0900 RNZI GOING SOUTH - Celebration of New Zealand's pivotal role in the exploration and exploitation of the icy Southern continent over the past century 11675 1230-1300 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Fruit juice 1405-1500 *CBCR1 SUNDAY EDITION HOUR 2: The Story of Iraq, BBC {+1/2/3/4h] 1505-1600 *CBCR1 SUNDAY EDITION HOUR 3: H. L. Mencken [+1/2/3/4h] 1700-1740 *BBCR4 FILE ON 4: Drugs and crime in Britain`s Asian communities 1700-1745 *BBCR3 DISCOVERING MUSIC: Mahler`s 4th Symphony 1700-1800 *KGOU STATE OF UNION: Public companion to Bush`s speech 1730-2100 *WHRB GOON BUT NOT FORGOTTEN 1800-1900 *KUNM FEMINISMS: The Care Drain: Third world women, first world work 1800-1900 *KGOU NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Sen. Ted Kennedy % 1800-1900 *BBC7 CHILDHOOD`S END by Arthur C. Clarke 2 of 2 rpt 2400 1800-1900 *BBCWe PLAY OF THE WEEK: Ministry of performing arts and crafts 1830-1945 *BBCR3 DRAMA ON 3: Superblock, by Jeff Young: The year is 2040. Superblock is a visit to a 1,470 floor tower block built from the salvaged concrete and bricks of the 67 Liverpool high rises demolished in 2005. 14,000 feet high, home to 140,000 people, Superblock is an echo chamber reverberating with voices, like a monstrous filing cabinet full of the filed lives of everyone who ever lived there 2000-2210 *WMNR NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: Wagner, R. Strauss 2100-2400 *WHRB BING CROSBY CENTENARY 2105-2200 *CBCR2 SAY IT WITH MUSIC: ``Chicago`` soundtrack 2130-2200 *BBCR4 PORN AGAIN: industry at the cutting edge of technology 2200-2300 *WYSO Meet All Your Fine Friends: The Dew Drop Inn in New Orleans 2300-XXXX *KING Live broadcast from Town Hall with the Orlando Consort. Program of "Food, Wine and Song" presented by the Early Music Guild 2330-2400 *BBCR4 SOMETHING UNDERSTOOD: Indian origin of Snakes & Ladders UT MON JANUARY 27 MONDAYS St. John Chrysostom 0000-0100 *BBC7 CHILDHOOD`S END by Arthur C. Clarke 2 of 2 0000-0100 *WBEZ NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Sen. Ted Kennedy [WBEZ daily 1.26 listing of Sun eve specials back at 0200- 0500 UT Mon is wrong!!!] 0000-0100 *CAINAN STATE OF THE UNION: A Hearing Voices Special 0000-0100 *WUOL ON ANOTHER NOTE: Classical composers at the cinema 0000-0200 *WHRB VERNON DUKE CENTENARY film composer 0100-0200 *WBEZ ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Case against war with Iraq, Steven Zunes 0100-XXXX *WFIU WORLD CHORAL SPECTACULAR 0100-0400 *WNYCa RADIO LAB: Nike, not just a shoe company 0100-0200 *CAINAN CHANGING WORLD: Body Trade, 1 & 2 of 4 [3 & 4 Feb 3 0200!] 0200-0500 *WHRB AMERICAN CLASSICS 0200-0300 *CAINAN SPEAKING OF FAITH: The soul in depression 0500-0600 *WYSO Meet All Your Fine Friends: The Dew Drop Inn in New Orleans 0500-0500? *Sirius 80, 82, 85: MOZART BIRTHDAY CELEBRATION 0500-XXXX *WHRB RAY BROWN ORGY jazz bassist [more orgies to be added] 1405-1430 *BBCWa MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 2 of 2 1500-1700 *BBCWe WORLD BRIEFING SPECIAL: Blix report at the UN; analysis 1530-1600 *CBCR1 SPECIAL: Blix report at UN [live] 1600-1630 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Fruit juice 1600-1659 *NPR DIANE REHM: The Greenback`s impact abroad % 1600-1700 *BBCR3 STAGE & SCREEN: Richard Rodgers tribute 2 of 2: with Hammerstein 1600-1700 *WOIa TALK OF IOWA: WOI Manager`s Day 1905-1930 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 2 of 2 2000-2030 *BBCR4 THE MAKING OF SADDAM 2030-2100 *BBCR4 THE REAL PATRON SAINTS OF BRITAIN: Andrew 2100-2130 *BBCR4 NATURE: Otters vs Minks 2100-2200 *OPB CHAUTAUQUA: Peter Singer, Bioethics, animal liberation UT TUE JANUARY 28 TUESDAYS National Holiday in Australia Israel parliamentary elections 0100-0200 *KGOU SPEAKING OF FAITH: The soul in depression 0105-0130 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 2 of 2 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Saddam Hussein: Making of a dictator [+1/2/3/4 h] 0230-0300 *KUSP GEEK SPEEK: Marvels of audio headsets 0300-0400 *WOIa TALK OF IOWA: WOI Manager`s Day 0300-0400 *KBYU FAMILY THEATRE: Tale of Two Cities, Orson Welles, Mercury 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: crisis in education? 0400-0500 *KQED WORLD AFFAIRS: Struggle for Human Rights, Aryeh Neier 1330-1400 *BBCR4 CLAPPERS: styles and traditions of applause 1405-1430 *BBCWe MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 2 of 2 1500-1530 *CBCR1 OUTFRONT: "A Sky So Close: The Stories of Iraqis in Canada." Today, "My Beautiful Baghdad." [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1506-1559 *WPRi CONNECTION: Joe Klein sizes up Democratic pres. candidates 1606-1659 *WPRi CONNECTION: Backyard astronomy 1606-1659 *NPR DIANE REHM: Dancer, biography of Rudolf Nureyev % 1706-1759 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI TECH TUESDAY: Kevin Mitnick % 1806-1859 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Measuring America: surveying the frontier % [NOT; Blix report discussion instead] 1900-2230 *BBCR2 various music series: see DAY 2005-2030 *BBCWa MERIDIAN MASTERPIECE: art and ethics, 2 of 2 2006-2059 *NPR TOTN: Most important recorded sounds in American culture? % 2030-2100 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: In The Shark's Domain: An unusual story from Australia that chronicles how a small, close-knit community in Perth lost its innocence 2030-2130 *BBCR3 MELLY`S JAZZ SHOWMEN: Piano Pyrotechnicians 2230-2300 *KCRW POLITICS OF CULTURE: Norm Pattiz, R. Sawa, Farda developer % UT WED JANUARY 29 WEDNESDAYS St. Constantius 0200-XXXX ACTING PRESIDENT BUSH`S STATE OF THE UNION ADDRESS multiple 0205-0400 *BBCWS WORLD TODAY SPECIAL: Bush`s SOTU, analysis 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Analysis of State of the Union 0406-0459 *WPRi CONNECTION: Backyard astronomy 1230-1300 *RN DOCUMENTARY: Zeeland `53 [see DAY for some repeats] 1530-1600 *KUNM BIONEERS: Light at the edge of the world: reinventing the poetry of diversity 1530-1600 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: In The Shark's Domain: An unusual story from Australia that chronicles howa small, close-knit community in Perth lost its innocence. It begins when Ken is seized by a shark 1845-1930 *BBCR3 LEBRECHT LIVE: So what is great? 2000-2100 *BBCR2 MIKE HARDING: Ry Cooder, Buena Vista Social Club 2130-2200 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: In The Shark's Domain: An unusual story from Australia that chronicles howa small, close-knit community in Perth lost its innocence. It begins when Ken is seized by a shark 2200-2230 *BBCR2 BHANGRA & BEYOND: History of Asian music in Britain, 3 of 4 UT THU JANUARY 30 THURSDAYS St. Martina Kiribati parliamentary elections 0100-0200 *CBCR2 GREAT CANADIAN MUSIC DREAM Prairies/NWT semi-finals 0200-0300 *CBCR2 WOODY ALLEN`S NEW ORLEANS CLARINET, 2 of 6 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Guns, Germs and Steel 0400-0500 *KQED STATE OF THE UNION: A Hearing Voices special 0500-XXXX *WHRB PHARAOH SANDERS ORGY 1405-1430 *BBCWe MERIDIAN WRITING: The Buddha of Suburbia 1530-1600 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: in the Shark`s Domain 1606-1659 *NPR DIANE REHM: Arianna Huffington, Pigs at the Trough % 1606-1700 *WPRi CONNECTION: Hydrogen-powered cars 1630-1700 *BBCR4 MATERIAL WORLD: unexplored world of Terahertz Radiation 1700-2000 *WFMU Strength through Failure with Fabio: Sparks on the airwaves It's possible that many Americans have never heard the music of Sparks, but if you lived in Europe or Japan, you'd remember that Sparks are brothers Ron and Russel Mael who have churned out eclectic quirky pop songs with long titles since the late 60's 1930-2130 *BBCR3 PERFORMANCE ON 3: Joshua Bell, American violin virtuoso, live from Wigmore Hall 2000-2030 *BBCR4 THE DARK ORIGINS OF BRITAIN, 3 of 3 2005-2030 *BBCWa MERIDIAN WRITING: The Buddha of Suburbia 2100-2130 *BBCR4 LEADING EDGE new series: Saving the cod from extinxion UT FRI JANUARY 31 FRIDAYS Independence Day in Nauru St. John Bosco 0100-0200 *WPRi STATE OF THE STATE OF WISCONSIN ADDRESS BY GOVERNOR 0100-0300 *WUOT WORLD CHORAL SPECTACULAR, concludes, not 29th 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: the pursuit of nutrition 0400-0600 *KQED NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Democratic agenda: Pelosi & Daschle 0406-0500 *WPRi CONNECTION: Hydrogen-powered cars 0500-0600 tvCNN LARRY KING: Paul Harvey 0500-0700 *WHRB NINTENDO ORGY 0700-2345 *WHRB CHARLES LLOYD ORGY 1 of 2 0800-0900 tvCNN LARRY KING: Paul Harvey 1200-1230 *RN DOCUMENTARY: Zeeland '53, the great flood [see DAY for rpts] 1830-1900 *BBCR4 DEAD RINGERS last of series 1900-2000 *KVNF BLACK CANYON REGIONAL LAND TRUST 2006-2059 *NPR TOTN SCIENCE FRIDAY: Monitoring for bioterrism; the extravagant universe % STATIONS WITH PAGES FOR HOLIDAY 2002 SPECIALS -- more needed Many but not all of the items therein will be entered in our calendar [date range is mainly to show when next to be checked if there be gaps] {Original date ranges started much earlier than shown here in finale} CBC UT -4 thru -8 12/28-1/5 MPBC UT -5 12/31-1/1 VPR UT -5 12/31-1/1 WFCR UT -5 12/31-1/1 more WNYC UT -5 12/31-1/1 WQXR UT -5 12/31-1/1 WFUV UT -5 12/22-1/31 WHYY UT -5 12/31 WETA UT -5 12/28-1/1 WKSU UT -5 12/20-12/26 WYSO UT -5 12/31-1/1 WYSU UT -5 12/19-12/25 WMUB UT -5 12/31 WKAR UT -5 12/28 WLRN UT -5 12/28-1/3 [not in order] WMFE UT -5 12/28 GPB/GPR -5 12/28-12/30 [not in order] WUGA UT -5 12/31-1/1 WUOT UT -5 12/17-12/26 WSMC UT -5 WPLN UT -6 1/1 WUWF UT -6 12/17-12/24 [not -5!] WBHM UT -6 1/1 KUMR UT -6 12/23-12/27 [pdf] WBEZ UT -6 12/31-1/1 WGN UT -6 12/24-12/26 WPR UT -6 12/31-1/1 KUNI UT -6 12/31-1/1 extensive! KHKE UT -6 12/23-12/25 WOI UT -6 12/31-1/1 MPR UT -6 12/29-1/1 NPRN UT -6 1/4 KANU UT -6 12/31-1/1 KMUW UT -6 12/31-1/3 KHCC UT -6 12/23-12/24 a.k.a. R. Kansas KGOU UT -6 12/30-1/1 KUHF UT -6 12/31-1/1 KUNC UT -7 12/24-12/25 CPR UT -7 12/29 KUWR UT -7 12/31-1/1 KNAU UT -7 12/31-1/1 also KPUB KBYU UT -7 12/31-1/1 [little there; see Daily Listings instead] YPR UT -7 12/31- NWPR UT -8 12/31 KPBX UT -8 12/31-1/2 KNPR UT -8 1/1 KCRW UT -8 12/31-1/3 KCSN UT -8 TV GUIDE HOLIDAY VIEWING GUIDE UT -5 UT SAT FEBRUARY 1 SATURDAYS St. Henry Morse Malaysia Federal Territory Day (Kuala, Lumpur and Labuan) Malaysia Dayak Festival (Sarawak only) Mauritius Abolition of Slavery 0000-2200 Scandinavian Weekend Radio, lowpower monthly from Finland on 5980 or 5990 or 6170 and 11690 or 11720 0100-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: From Montreal, Tan Dun conducts the Montreal Symphony Orchestra in his own Orchestral Theatre 1 and Crouching Tiger Concerto 0230-0600 *WHRB CHARLES LLOYD ORGY 2 of 2 0500-0600 *KUNM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Dance party for winter blues 1300-1400 *BBCR3 WORLD ROUTES: Buena Vista Social Club members 1530-1600 *CBCR1 GROOVESHINNY, musical game show debut [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1730-xxxx *WABE CHINESE NEW YEAR OF THE SHEEP, rpt Feb 4 0100 1915-1935 *BBCR3 MET OPERA INTERVAL: NY Artists in Studios [time approx.] 1915-1935 *BBCR3 MET OPERA INTERVAL: Opera News? US net [time approx.] 1945-2000 *BBCR4 FOUR NOBLE TRUTHS OF BUDDHISM: 3: Cessation of suffering 2000-2100 *BBCR4 ARCHIVE HOUR: Life of Henry Mancini 2040-2100 *BBCR3 MET OPERA INTERVAL: Opera Quiz +US net [time approx.] 2200-2410 *WHRB NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: Wagner, R. Strauss 2205-2230 *BBCWe COMPOSER OF THE MONTH: Elgar 2230-2300 *BBCWe ONE WORLD, ONE SOUND, 1 of 4 2300-0100 *PRI PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION: 2003 Joke Show UT SUN FEBRUARY 2 SUNDAYS Aruba carnival week Kyrgyzstan referendum Russia gubernatorial elections (Magadan Oblast) 0100-0200 *KUNM ALTERNATIVE RADIO: The other 9/11: Chile, 1973 0200-0300 *WOIa FIRST PERSON SPEAKING OF FAITH: the soul in depression 0200-0300 *WQXR KOSCIUSZKO FOUNDATION CHAMBER MUSIC: Smetana, Ravel 0400-0600 WBMJ Special MW DX test on 1190 from San Juan PR, and on WIVV 1370 Vieques 0530-0630 CHWO Special MW DX test on 740 from Toronto 1230-1300 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Food waste 1400-1500 *BBCR3 BBC LEGENDS: Claudio Arrau, 1 of 2 1400-1600 *KUNM WE WERE HERE: MLK tribute 1700-1745 *BBCR3 DISCOVERING MUSIC: Bruckner`s Symphony No. 9 1700-1900 *KGOU DESTINATION FREEDOM: Black Radio Days, 3 positive dramas 1800-1900 *KUNM MEETING OF MINDS 2100-2300 *WHRB WORLD MUSIC: Iraqi Oud Tradition 2140-2300 *BBCR3 PROMS 2002: early Spanish music 2300-2400 *WBEZ AMERICAN RADIO WORKS: Radio fights Jim Crow 2330-2400 *BBCR4 SOMETHING UNDERSTOOD: Symbolism of fountains in Islam UT MON FEBRUARY 3 MONDAYS St. Blaise Mozambique Heroes Day; New Zealand Nelson Day (Nelson only) Sao Tomé and Principe Martyrs' Day Vietnam Communist Party's Foundation 0100-0200 *WBEZ Historic Preservation in Chicago, live 0100-0300 *WFMU Transpacific Sound Paradise with Rob Weisberg - guest DJ Sean Harvey surveys popular and traditional music of Haiti 0200-0300 *WNYCf MAD ABOUT MUSIC monthly supposedly, unconfirmed; see DAY link 0200-0300 *CAINAN BBC CHANGING WORLD: The Body Trade, 3 and 4 of 4 0300-0400 *CAINAN MOLLY IVINS: Politics and the Art of Deception 1405-1430 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: In a series of four programmes entitled 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans', Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. Prog. 1: The Americanisation Of Space and Time 1406-1459 *WMUB INTERCONNECT: Mulatto America 1506-1559 *NPR DIANE REHM: Economic implications of war % [NOT: Columbia instead; this moved to 1606] 1600-1630 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Food waste 1600-1700 *BBCR3 STAGE & SCREEN: Film composer David Raksin 1606-1659 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Americans abroad 1815-XXXX *KCCU STATE OF THE STATE, OK Gov. Brad Henry [did not start until 1858] 1905-1930 *BBCWe Meridian - Masterpiece: In a series of four programmes entitled 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans', Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. Prog. 1: The Americanisation Of Space and Time 2030-2100 *BBCR4 THE REAL PATRON SAINTS: George UT TUE FEBRUARY 4 TUESDAYS St. Andrew Corsini Angola Beginning of Armed Uprising Sri Lanka Independence Day 0006-0059 *WMUB INTERCONNECT: Mulatto America 0100-0200 *KGOU MEET ALL YOUR FINE FRIENDS: THE DEW DROP INN IN NEW ORLEANS 0105-0130 *BBCWS Meridian - Masterpiece: In a series of four programmes entitled 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans', Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. Prog. 1: The Americanisation Of Space and Time 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Is there a crisis in truth? Debate [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Robert McWhorter: Authentically Black 0330-XXXX *KING LIVE BY GEORGE: PLU faculty members, violinist Maria Sampen and pianist Duane Hulbert, UPS faculty members, cellist Cordelia Wikarski and pianist Keith Ward. Plus an appearance by a noted bagpiper from Masters of the Scottish Arts. Plus, plus…guitarist Andre Feriante 0400-0500 *KQED World Affairs Council: "Massacres, Drugs, and America's War in Colombia," Tonight's speaker is Robin Kirk 1330-1400 *BBCR4 THE REAL HISTORY OF OPERA: Don Giovanni 1405-1430 *BBCWe Meridian - Masterpiece: In a series of four programmes entitled 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans', Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. Prog. 1: The Americanisation Of Space and Time 1606-1700 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: It's a war of words between the United States and France. How Gallic pride meets American pith in a showdown over Iraq, prompting those on both sides of the Atlantic to wield their poison pens 1900-2230 *BBCR2 various music series; see DAY 2000-2040 *BBCR4 FILE ON 4: tax avoidance 2005-2030 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: In a series of four programmes entitled 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans', Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. Prog. 1: The Americanisation Of Space and Time 2100-2130 *BBCR4 CASE NOTES: Corticosteroids 2130-2215 *BBCR3 NIGHT WAVES: Richard Dawkins, the Great Darwinian 2230-2300 *KCRW Design and Architecture: Frances Anderton talks with James Dyson about his revolutionary cyclone vacuum cleaner design 2300-2330 *BBCR4 THE MARK STEEL LECTURE: Beethoven UT WED FEBRUARY 5 WEDNESDAYS St. Agatha Burundi Day of Unity; Tanzania Chama Cha Mapinduzi Day San Marino St Agale's Day; Mexico Constitution Day 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Part One of Manufacturing Patients. New, or newly prevalent, medical disorders are sometimes identified just when a treatment happens to become available. The treatments are always patented and never cheap. Alan Cassels traces the source of these disorders to the inventive folks in drug company labs and their public relations teams, who colonize a whole range of human normality -- such as compulsive shopping, boyhood exuberance, and maturity [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Future of American foreign policy 0400-0500 *KQED CITY ARTS & LECTURES: Jim Harrison, author of "Legends of the Fall" and "The Beast God Forgot to Invent" 0406-0500 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: It's a war of words between the United States and France. How Gallic pride meets American pith in a showdown over Iraq, prompting those on both sides of the Atlantic to wield their poison pens 1230-1300 *RN DOCUMENTARY: River series: Volga 5965 [see DAY for repeats] 1530-XXXX *WUOT SPECIAL FROM NPR: SOS Powell at the UN 1530-XXXX *KOSU SPECIAL FROM NPR: SOS Powell at the UN [and many others] 1530-XXXX *CBCR1 NEWS SPECIAL: US SOS Powell at the UN 1706-1800 *KQED FORUM with Michael Krasny: Recent allegations of theft, fraud, and mismanagement at Los Alamos National Laboratory, a nuclear weapons lab managed by the University of California. Guests: Michael Reese, spokesperson for the University of California Office of the President; Per Peterson, professor and chair of the department of Nuclear Engineering at UC Berkeley; and check-ins with: Steven Doran, consultant for University of California and one of two Los Alamos investigators fired and later rehired by the University of California; and Peter Stockton, senior investigator for the Project on Government Oversight [NOT: tho not foreseen in daily sked, pre-empted by UN Security Council speeches; normally repeats at 0600, but this subject may not have been produced at all. If so, let us hope it be rescheduled] 2005-2030 *BBCWe DISCOVERY: In the first of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil probably the most successful nation in South America for science and technology UT THU FEBRUARY 6 THURSDAYS Sts. Paul Miki & Co. New Zealand Waitangi (National Day) Sápmi (Lapland) National Day 0100-0200 *CBCR2 GREAT CANADIAN MUSIC DREAM: Ontario semifinals 0100-0200 *WMNR Masterpiece Theatre scores 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Part One of James Joyce: A Tale of Two Cities. James Joyce chose "silence, exile and cunning" and abandoned Dublin for Trieste in 1904. He was looking for a job, a new way of being a writer, and an alternative to Irish Nationalism. He found them all in the Mediterranean city of Trieste. Philip Coulter explores Dublin's Joyce and Joyce's Trieste [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 RNZI The Waitangi Rua Rau Tau Lecture: Encounters & Responses Justice Sir Rodney Gallen presents the inaugural annual lecture in a series aimed at monitoring progress towards a truly celebratory national bicentennial in 2040: 17675 0205-0230 *BBCWS DISCOVERY: In the first of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil probably the most successful nation in South America for science and technology 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: "As American As Apple Pie: How Segregation and Terror Lost, 1940-1954.": This program looks at the 15 years that set the state for the Civil Rights Movement and illuminates the mid-century battle for American hearts and minds with recordings and recollections from Thurgood Marshall, Paul Robeson, A. Philip Randolph, and Stetson Kennedy [rpt at 1000] 0500-XXXX *KUNM HOMELESSNESS MARATHON 0606-0700 *KQED FORUM: Los Alamos NL, if repeatable from 1706 Wed, q.v. [yes] 1505-1530 *BBCWe DISCOVERY: In the first of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil probably the most successful nation in South America for science and technology 1600-1700 *BBCR3 MUSIC RESTORED: Origin of the Symphony, besides Haydn 1630-1700 *BBCR4 MATERIAL WORLD: Autosub under Antarctic ice sheets 2000-2030 *BBCR4 SPIES R US: History of CIA, 1 of 3: The Focus of Evil 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: What If? Alternative scripts for history 2100-2130 *BBCR4 LEADING EDGE: Proust phenomenon: linking smell and memory 2105-2130 *BBCWa DISCOVERY: In the first of three programmes Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil probably the most successful nation in South America for science and technology 2305-2400 *CBCR1 AS IT HAPPENS: Mock Security Council debate on whether there's enough evidence to authorize a military campaign [+1/2/3/4 hours] UT FRI FEBRUARY 7 FRIDAYS St. Richard Grenada Independence Day 0100-0200 *WCPN ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Malcolm X and the Politics of Race 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: A Canadian Imperialist Abroad. "What a strange existence mine has been." Those words are from the diary of Halifax native William Grant Stairs. Ian Porter traces Stairs' travels through what was then called "The Dark Continent" [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-0300 *WCPN QUIET CRISIS: Universities and their cities, part 8 0200-0300 tvCNN LARRY KING LIVE: Bill Clinton [+3/6 hours] 0300-XXXX *KBYU WILLIAM GRANT STILL RETROSPECTIVE 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: The World of Design 0405-0430 *BBCWS COMPOSER OF THE MONTH: Elgar 1200-1230 *RN DOCUMENTARY: River series: Volga +5965 [see DAY for repeats] 1350-1400 *KOSU VOICES OF OKLAHOMA: JIMMIE BAKER: KOSU celebrates the life of OSU alumnus and Hollywood producer Jimmie Baker in a rebroadcast of a two-part "Voices of Oklahoma" series. The multi-talented Baker died this week in California following a recent stroke. During one of his final visits to OSU in October 2000, Baker visited with KOSU Program Director Kelly Burley about his college days as a dance bandleader, drum major and disc jockey and his prolific career as a Hollywood producer and director. This two-part special will air Friday at 7:50 a.m. and 4:30 p.m. 1500-1530 *BBCR4 RAMBLINGS walking thru the British countryside, new series 1505-1530 *BBCWa DISCOVERY: In the first of three programmes Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil probably the most successful nation in South America for science and technology 1530-1600 *KUNM UNIVERSITY SHOWCASE: Reader`s Theatre 1606-1700 *WPRi ALL ABOUT FOOD: Caviar 1700-1800 *WUOT As American As Apple Pie: How Segregation and Terror Lost, 1940-54 1800-1900 *KUNI CLASSICALLY BLACK: Chevalier de St Georges 1806-2100 *WUOT MONTHLY CLASSICAL REQUEST SHOW 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: What`s next in space % 2230-2236 *KOSU VOICES OF OKLAHOMA: JIMMIE BAKER, 2 of 2; see 1350 UT SAT FEBRUARY 8 SATURDAYS 0000-0100 *WCPN ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Politics, Art of Deception: Molly Ivins 0200-0300 *WFPL STATE OF AFFAIRS with Julie Kredens: Al-Jazeera (Arabic for "the island") is an independent all-Arab television news network based in Qatar. This network has access to the Arab world, and has emerged as an international relations ambassador with exclusive access to Osama bin Laden and members of the Taliban. Its has reached the American spotlight through daily exposure on CNN in the U.S. Join us as we discuss news broadcasting in the Middle East and its struggle for a free press and public opinion in the Arab world with Adel Iskandar, co-author of "Al-Jazeera: How the Free Arab News Network Scooped the World and Changed the Middle East." 0200-0300 *WMNR MIXED BAG Classical Music Hour: Classical Music Quiz 0300-0400 *WNNR MIXED BAG Broadway and Film Scores: Mystery Voice Quiz; Sondheim: A Little Night Music 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Argonne National Lab 0400-0500 *KQED Commonwealth Club: Christopher Hitchens, journalist, and Mark Danner, professor of the Graduate School of Journalism at UC Berkeley. In debate format, moderated by the Dean of the Graduate School of Journalism, Orville Schell. They address the repercussions of a possible War in Iraq, the War on Terror, an the use of American power 0406-0500 *WPRi ALL ABOUT FOOD: Caviar 1330-1400 *BBCWa The Music Feature: Desert Blues: Andy Kershaw travels to Timbuktu in the Sahara desert, to take part in one of the world's oldest music festivals. The festival sees the traditional gathering of the Touareg people, who sing gentle hypnotic songs about desert life, 1 of 2 1530-1600 *BBCR4 REEL HISTORIES: Blazing Saddles 1530-1600 *CBCR1 GROOVESHINNY: quiz show that pits a perfect stranger against two perfect musical minds…the ringers: Ted Dykstra, the musical mastermind behind Two Pianos Four Hands, not to mention a cross-dresser in Hedwig and the Angry Inch. And author, TV host, and Creedence fanatic, our own "trivia terminator" — Richard Crouse. And this week's perfect stranger? Kim Kavanagh, a nice enough woman who foolishly allowed Brent Bambury into her car. Will Kim stun the nation with her intimate knowledge of Madonna, Rick Springfield and Miles Davis? Or will Brent Bambury throw the switch that releases the trap-door strategically located beneath her chair? [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1955-2020 *BBCR3 MET OPERA QUIZ time approx., also US, Canadian, etc. nets 2000-2100 *WLRN DESTINATION FREEDOM: Father to Son: Adam Clayton Powell 2000-2100 *BBCR4 ARCHIVE HOUR: Rebel Hell: as if cricket matters, S. Africa 2100-2200 *KQED UNCOMMON COURAGE: The Viola Liuzzo story 2300-2330 *CBCR1 THE WORLD THIS WEEKEND: Galapagos Islands [+1/2/3 hours] 2300-0100 *OPB PRAIRIE HOME COMPANION: Joke Show, delayed from last week [only so on OPB?? Valentine show scheduled elsewhere] UT SUN FEBRUARY 9 SUNDAYS Lebanon St Maron's Day Monaco parliamentary elections Montenegro presidential elections 0100-0300 *WCNY Choral Traditions with Bonnie Beth Derby: THE ARS NOVA SINGERS AND THE MUSIC OF BILL DOUGLAS. New Age artist and composer Bill Douglas will be featured as the Ars Nova Singers combine their talents with orchestra, woodwinds and synthesizer in a number of his original works and arrangements. Included will be his well-known choral setting of "Deep Peace." 0200-0300 *WBEZ PERFORMANCE SPACE: Pianist Ahmad Jamal 0200-0300 *WOIa THIRD COAST INTERNATIONAL AUDIO FESTIVAL 0230-0300 *BBCWa MUSIC REVIEW: One world, one sound 1 of 4 0600-0900 WBBR-1130, WEVD-1050, WWDJ-970 NY/NJ to be off for maintenance during part of these hours, opening frequencies for DX 1230-1300 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Foods eaten by desert communities 1500-XXXX European Music Radio via Latvia 5935 [3-019] 1601-1700 *BBCWS INTERNATIONAL RECITAL: South American singer Barbara Luna 1700-1740 *BBCR4 FILE ON 4: Tax avoidance 1700-1745 *BBCR3 DISCOVERING MUSIC: Stravinsky`s Symphonies of Winds 1700-1800 *KGOU REMEMBERING JIM CROW 1745-1830 *BBCR3 SUNDAY FEATURE: Imagine a poem more than a million lines long, more than a thousand years old, a treasure of world heritage equivalent to the works of Homer or the Mahabharata, and yet very little known in the west. The Gesar Of Ling is just such an ancient Tibetan epic which has been handed down for more than a millennium by divine bards, illiterate inspired poets who sing the heroic story in a state of trance. It is a living epic in every sense, preserved in the memories of the Tibetan nomads and despite its ancient origins still generating new episodes. Isabel Hilton travels to the northern side of Tibetan plateau in Qinghai Province in search of one of the great epic poems of the world 1800-1900 *KGOU OKLAHOMA VOICES: Legislative session preview? See Tue U 1805-1900 *CBCR1 As It Happens special: mock Security Council debate on whether there's enough evidence to authorize a military campaign against Iraq [+1/2 hours] 2000-2100 WBCQ *LASER RADIO MEDIA SHOW: R. Caroline`s Peter Moore 9335- CUSB [and via Latvia 5935] 2100-2200 WBCQ *Welcome to LaserRadio.net - LIVE from London with Geoff Rogers and Stewart Ross 9335-CUSB 2100-2200 *WPRi University of the Air: Central Asia is a patchwork of ancient cultures and we'll sample their music 2100-2200 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Anthony Bourdain, chef, broadcaster, and author of "Kitchen Confidential" and "A Cook's Tour." 2100-2300 *WHRB LIVE FROM CABOT HOUSE chamber music? 2200-2300 WBCQ *LASER RADIO: Paul Goodwin`s eclectic musical journeys 9335-cusb 2230-2300 *BBCR3 BETWEEN THE EARS: Mountain-climbing Obsessives 2300-2330 *WBEZ Destination Freedom: "Housing" (PRI) Set in Chicago in the late 1940s, this dramatization exposes how restrictive covenants and outright violence kept millions of blacks trapped in housing conditions guaranteed to produce ill health and wide profit margins. Jack Warren, a black, hard- working family man and WWII veteran, is caught up in — and manipulated by — system designed to profit at his expense 2300-2400 *WBGH ARTS & IDEAS: Two stories for African American History Month: Africans in America and a dramatization of Zora Neale Hurston's short story Sweat 2300-2400 WBCQ *LASER RADIO: England's England, surreal experience with Christopher England 9335-CUSB 2330-2400 *WBEZ Nigger: The Strange Career of a Troublesome Word (Cambridge Forum) Harvard Law Professor Randall Kennedy, discusses his controversial book on the history and evolution of perhaps the most inflammatory word in our contemporary language UT MON FEBRUARY 10 MONDAYS St. Scholastica Malta Shipwreckage of Saint Paul 0000-0100 *WCNY Discography with Chuck Klaus: GOLOVANOV CONDUCTS TCHAIKOVSKY. We'll sample a unique conception of the Symphony No.6 in b minor, recorded in 1948. The energetic Soviet conductor Nicolai Golovanov will lead the Great Symphony Orchestra of the All-Union Radio and Central TV 0000-0100 *WBEZ Freedom: Songs from the Heart of America (NPR): A journey through the history of this country, exploring the idea of freedom — how different types of Americans have defined it, how it has been fought for and struggled over, how it has been expanded and redifined 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILES: Alice Walker 0000-0200 *CAINAN We were Here: Collage of poetry, music & Dr. Martin Luther King's oratory 0030-0100 *WUMB DESTINATION FREEDOM: BLACK RADIO DAYS: This Black History Month Special is presented throughout February on Sundays at 7:00am and is repeated Sunday nights at 7:30pm. Tonight: Housing 0100-0200 *WBEZ ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Peter Korn Bluh on 9/11, 1973: Chile 0100-0400 *WNYCa RADIO LAB: What's so Funny? Diversity of New York City collides with the New York City sense of humor. Something has got to give. Or not. Laugh Tracks: The bedrock to a good sense of humor is the ability to laugh at oneself. Next step, for the aspiring comedian: laugh at one's own culture. In this two part series, past and present-day purveyors of ethnic humor trade stories of turning mysery into comedy 0200-0300 *CAINAN American as Apple Pie: How Segregation and Terror Lost 1940-54 0300-0400 *CAINAN Elaine Brown: Demonizing Race 0300-0400 *WOIa PRAIRIE LIGHTS: David Roosevelt, grandson of Eleanor Roosevelt, will read from "Grandmere: A Personal History of Eleanor Roosevelt." 0500-0600 *WBEZ PERFORMANCE SPACE: Pianist Ahmad Jamal 1405-1430 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans: Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. 2 of 4: Malls And MacDonalds 1600-1630 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Desert food 1600-1700 *BBCR3 STAGE & SCREEN: Marvin Hamlisch 1800-XXXX *KUSP TALK OF THE BAY: Host John Sandidge welcomes back sister city delegates Brett Taylor and Ellen Farmer to talk about their recent trip to Cuba. Also, news from "WILPF", the Women's International League for Peace and Freedom, which turns 88 this year. The national organization's co- president Sandy Silver talks about the recent international peace conference in New Zealand, and we'll learn about the local Peace is Patriotic Campaign. And Assemblyman John Laird delivers this week's Sacramento report 1806-1900 *KQED FORUM with Michael Krasny: Discusses the history of coal with author Barbara Freese. Freese is an environmental attorney and author of "Coal: A Human History." 1905-1930 *BBCWe Meridian - Masterpiece: Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans: Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. 2 of 4: Malls And MacDonalds 1906-1959 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: More than at any other time, war calls on each of us to define what it means to be a patriot. Guest host Melinda Penkava will look at how different ideas of patriotism took root during the Civil War and continue today [NOT: last minute change to the Allies and Iraq] % 1925-2230 *BBCR3 OPERA ON 3: Magic Flute, ROH 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: What would you do to reach out to others in a war torn country where most people spoke a different language? For American teacher Paula Huntley, the answer was a book club. It's a story about reading and transformation. Hear about the Kosovo Book Club % 2106-2200 *KQED FRESH AIR: Terry Gross interviews Dean Kamen, the inventor of the Segway Human Transporter, the new high-tech scooter. Also, she talks with Bruce Lee Livingston of the Senior Action Network. He helped lead the movement to ban the Segway from San Francisco sidewalks UT TUE FEBRUARY 11 TUESDAYS Our Lady of Lourdes; Holy See Lateran Treaty Cameroon Day of Youth; Iran Revolution Day Japan Founding of the Nation Day (Kenkoku kinen no hi) Liberia Armed Forces Day 0100-0200 *KTEP CLASSICALLY BLACK: Chevalier de Saint Georges 0100-0200 *KGOU OKLAHOMA VOICES: Legislative session preview U 0105-0130 *BBCWS Meridian - Masterpiece: Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans: Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. 2 of 4: Malls And MacDonalds 0200-0300 *WFPL BLACK RADIO DAYS: Destination Freedom 0206-0300 *Mich CONNECTION: New face of homelessness 0306-0400 *WPRi CONNECTION: New face of homelessness 0306-0400 *KQED FRESH AIR: Terry Gross interviews Dean Kamen, the inventor of the Segway Human Transporter, the new high-tech scooter. Also, she talks with Bruce Lee Livingston of the Senior Action Network. He helped lead the movement to ban the Segway from San Francisco sidewalks 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Rise of Militant Islam: As the war on terrorism continues in all its forms, we are still faced with a mysterious foe. AHMED RASHID has been one of the leading students of radical Islam and terrorism during more than two decades as a major international journalist. His very important book is Jihad: The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia and he joins us tonight for the full two hours to discuss this difficult but crucial subject 0400-0500 *KQED World Affairs Council: "Killing for the State: A Psychological Case Study of an Apartheid Death Squad Chief." Tonight's speaker is Pumla Gobodo-Madikizela, psychologist, activist, author, and former Head of the Truth and Reconciliation Commission in Cape Town, South Africa. In her new book, "A Human Being Died That Night: A South African Story of Forgiveness," she explores the mind of Eugene de Kock, one of the apartheid regime's most notorious enforcers 1330-1400 *BBCR4 REAL HISTORY OF OPERA: Huw Edwards uncovers the social context behind operas. 2. Eugene Onegin: Behind Tchaikovsky's treatment of Pushkin's epic novel lie some strange instances of life imitating art 1405-1430 *BBCWe Meridian - Masterpiece: Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans: Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. 2 of 4: Malls And MacDonalds 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM: North Korea and the Bush policy % 1506-1600 *WPRi CONNECTION: the continuing crisis in North Korea. Despite the fact the "hermit kingdom" has threatened the United States with a pre-emptive strike, Washington maintains it's all about diplomacy on the Korean peninsula 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: With all eyes focused on the five permanent members, some are calling for seating India at the Security Council. On The Connection after ten, what bringing the world's largest democracy to the table might mean for international security 1706-1759 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI TECH TUESDAY: Best search engine: not Google % 1706-1800 *WCPN AROUND NOON: "Berlin Film Festival Report": The Cleveland Film Society's new Artistic Director, Alissa Simon, reports from the 53rd annual Berlin International Film Festival. Simon shares info about the movies that are currently the talk of Europe, as well as the scoop on what foreign film goodies might return with her for this year's Cleveland International Film Festival in March. 1806-1900 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny: Conversation with nationally syndicated columnist Arianna Huffington about corporate America. Her latest book is "Pigs at the Trough: How Corporate Greed and Political Corruption are Undermining America." 1845-1900 *BBCWe HEART & SOUL: Modern Muslim Marriage: For many Muslims, marriage is the cornerstone of Islamic society. But courtship, marriage and divorce are all changing throughout the Islamic world. Navid Akhtar investigates 1900-2230 *BBCR2 various music series; see DAY 1945-2000 *BBCWa HEART & SOUL: Modern Muslim Marriage: For many Muslims, marriage is the cornerstone of Islamic society. But courtship, marriage and divorce are all changing throughout the Islamic world. Navid Akhtar investigates 2005-2030 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans: Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. 2 of 4: Malls And MacDonalds [why is this part of `Masterpiece'?] 2030-2100 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: The threat to the Hindu pilgrimage of Narmada Parikrama caused by the Narmada Dam scheme in the area UT WED FEBRUARY 12 WEDNESDAYS Sts. Saturnius, Dativus Eid-ul-Adha [Hajj] USA Lincoln's Birthday (CA, CT, KS, MD, MI, MO, NJ, NY, PA, VT, WA, WV only) 0000-0030 *KQED MARKETPLACE: What's in a name? Philip Morris is changing the company name to the much less recognizable Altria Group, Inc. We'll talk about how you choose a new name for an old company [repeat at 0230; also many other stations] 0045-0100 *BBCWa HEART & SOUL: Modern Muslim Marriage: For many Muslims, marriage is the cornerstone of Islamic society. But courtship, marriage and divorce are all changing throughout the Islamic world. Navid Akhtar investigates 0100-0200 *WCPN Uncommon Courage: The Viola Liuzzo Story: Host David Person profiles Viola Liuzzo, the Detroit housewife who became a civil rights icon. Committed to the ideals of equality and justice, Liuzzo participated in the celebrated voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery, and was later murdered by members of the Ku Klux Klan. Liuzzo is believed to be the only white woman martyred in the cause of voting rights. The program considers Liuzzo's motivation to go to Selma, the significance of her efforts in the civil rights and women's movements, and the impact of her death. Liuzzo's story is interwoven with music by Ben Harper, Curtis Mayfield, John Coltrane and the Golden Gate Quartet. 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: New, or newly prevalent, medical disorders are sometimes identified just when a treatment happens to become available. The treatments are always patented and never cheap. Alan Cassels traces the source of these disorders to the inventive folks in drug company labs and their medical consultants, who discover "off-label" (that is, unauthorized) prescription cures for shoplifting, rambunctious boyhood, and envy. The conclusion of Manufacturing Patients [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0230-0300 *BBCWS OMNIBUS: The threat to the Hindu pilgrimage of Narmada Parikrama caused by the Narmada Dam scheme in the area 0230-0300 *KQED MARKETPLACE: What's in a name? Philip Morris is changing the company name to the much less recognizable Altria Group, Inc. We'll talk about how you choose a new name for an old company [repeat of 0000; also many other stations] 0306-0400 *WPRi CONNECTION: the continuing crisis in North Korea. Despite the fact the "hermit kingdom" has threatened the United States with a pre-emptive strike, Washington maintains it's all about diplomacy on the Korean peninsula 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Germany 1933-1945: The Nazi period left in its wake a legacy of death and destruction unparalleled in modern history. The institutionalization of a radical racial regime and untold persecutions at home, the launching of a war that cost over 50 million lives and ended European world dominance for all time, the extermination of 6 million Jews and millions of other on racial grounds: these were some of its defining "achievements." How did such a regime come into existence? What did it attempt during its six years of "peaceful" rule? And what fatal flaws led to its ultimate destruction in the "Goetterdammerung" of 1945? Our guests tonight include BRYAN MARK RIGG, who previously appeared with us for his book Hitler's Jewish Soldiers: The Untold Story of Nazi Racial Laws and Men of Jewish Descent in the German Military, and more 0400-0500 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Anthony Bourdain, chef, broadcaster, and author of "Kitchen Confidential" and "A Cook's Tour." 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: With all eyes focused on the five permanent members, some are calling for seating India at the Security Council. On The Connection after ten, what bringing the world's largest democracy to the table might mean for international security 1230-1400 *CBCR1 The Current: Host Anna Maria Tremonti opens up the file on two Canadians being held in foreign jails. Their families haven't heard from either of them in weeks. Also, why the possibility of war in Iraq could be the chance for Kurdish nationalists to establish their own state. A feature documentary looks at the movement and its conflict with the Turkish government. And Stephen Lewis gives an update on the AIDS crisis in Africa [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1330-1336 *KOSU Oklahoma Audio Almanac host Steven Knoche Kite remembers Lon Chaney Junior, born this week in Oklahoma City 1430-1500 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: Are Quebeckers really more permissive than the rest of Canadians? This week on C'est La Vie, you can judge for yourself. Take a peek inside Montreal`s first heterosexual sauna. And meet one of the men who started the Sexology Department at a Montreal University - a world first [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1530-1600 *BBCWe OMNIBUS: The threat to the Hindu pilgrimage of Narmada Parikrama caused by the Narmada Dam scheme in the area 1830-1845 *BBCWa HEART & SOUL: Modern Muslim Marriage: For many Muslims, marriage is the cornerstone of Islamic society. But courtship, marriage and divorce are all changing throughout the Islamic world. Navid Akhtar investigates 1930-2215 *BBCR3 AN EVENING FROM THE COLOSSEUM: An evening of programmes about one of the worlds most evocative buildings and the society that built it the Colosseum of ancient Rome. Presented from within the Colosseum's crumbling walls, historian Bettany Hughes and her guests discuss the latest thinking on the gladiators and the games and on the lives of the Romans who came to watch. Special features include: Not Over 'Til The Emperor Sings: Professor Edith Hall discovering the hidden origins of opera and ballet in the Colosseum. Imaging Rome: Dr Catherine Edwards sees Rome through the eyes of eminent commentators such as Gibbon, Byron, George Washington, Dickens and Sigmund Freud. The Roman Joy Of Sex: Dr Roy Gibson on Ovid and courtship. Roman Hollywood: Film expert Maria Wyke dissects the love affair between Hollywood and ancient Rome. The Greatest Show On Earth: All aspects of the day-to-day running of the Colosseum, such as how Roman citizens obtained tickets, who sat where and how they caught enough lions and tigers to supply the games. Plus reconstructed ancient Roman music and modern music that has been inspired by Rome and its spectacles, introduced by leading musicologists. 2000-2130 *BBCR2 Radio Two Folk Awards 2000-2300 *WFMU Mary McBride and Tammy Faye Starlite: on Trash, Twang and Thunder with Meredith Ochs. Meredith may have dropped out of theater club, but she know what she likes, and these gals have got it goin' on. At 3:30, twangy singer/songwriter, off- Broadway actress/playwright, globe trotter and former U.S. Senate page Mary McBride performs. Then at 4:30, singer/ performance artist/born-again country starlet Tammy Faye Starlite brings her righteous mix of gospel and porn. Live in the studio 2005-2030 *BBCWe Discovery: In the second of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil such a successful nation South America for science and technology 2030-2100 *BBCWe Sports International: Advances in prosthetics have led to some extraordinary performances in disabled sport. Glenn Hicks asks how long will it be before elite disabled atheletes and able-bodied compete together 2106-2200 *KQED FRESH AIR: We talk with journalist Ahmed Rashid. He covers Pakistan, Afghanistan and central Asia for the "Eastern Economic Review" and London's "The Daily Telegraph." And he's just spent several weeks in Afghanistan. His book "Jihad: The Rise of Militant Islam in Central Asia" has just come out in paperback 2130-2136 *KOSU Oklahoma Audio Almanac host Steven Knoche Kite remembers Lon Chaney Junior, born this week in Oklahoma City 2130-2200 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: The threat to the Hindu pilgrimage of Narmada Parikrama caused by the Narmada Dam scheme in the area 2200-2205 *KOSU Capitol Correspondent Ted Riley covers the teachers' rally at the Oklahoma State Capitol 2330-2400 *CBCR1 DISPATCHES: It doesn't trickle down: Connie Watson reports on the stand-off between the poor and middle classes for the benefits of Venezuela's oil wealth [+1/2/3/4 hours] UT THU FEBRUARY 13 THURSDAYS St. Martinian Georgia Mother's Day 0000-XXXX *WABE Atlanta Forum: Join Alvelyn Sanders for a conversation with legendary actress Ruby Dee, who is currently starring in St. Lucy's Eyes, a play by Bridgette Wimberly, at the Alliance Theatre. In this hour-long conversation, Ruby Dee reflects on her career as an actress, her life as an activist, coming of age in Harlem, and her unique perspective on the human experience 0100-0200 *CBCR2 The Great Canadian Music Dream: Classical and country. Rock and urban. Pop and opera. Some of the country's most exciting new musical talent vie for stardom as General Motors of Canada presents The Great Canadian Music Dream, a series of six specials on CBC Television and CBC Radio Two. This week, the Semi-Finals for the Atlantic Region. Guest performers include Damhnait Doyle and Bruce Guthro, and comedian Bette MacDonald heads up the jury 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: the conclusion of James Joyce: A Tale of Two Cities. James Joyce chose "silence, exile and cunning," and abandoned Dublin for Trieste in 1904. He was looking for a job, a new way of being a writer, and an alternative to Irish Nationalism. He found them all in the Mediterranean city of Trieste. Philip Coulter explores Dublin's Joyce and Joyce's Trieste [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-XXXX *CBCR2 After Hours Presents Woody Allen's New Orleans Clarinet In this six part series film director, comedian and clarinetist Woody Allen surveys the world of New Orleans jazz clarinet. He offers his personal selection of New Orleans favourites including George Lewis, Johnny Dodds, Jimmie Noone, Albert Burbank and Sidney Bechet 0205-0230 *BBCWS Discovery: In the second of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil such a successful nation South America for science and technology 0230-0300 *BBCWS Sports International: Advances in prosthetics have led to some extraordinary performances in disabled sport. Glenn Hicks asks how long will it be before elite disabled athletes and able-bodied compete together xxxx-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Bob Schieffer, book tour [after basketball] 0400-0500 *KQED Uncommon Courage: The Viola Liuzzo Story: This documentary profiles Viola Liuzzo, a Detroit housewife who became a valiant icon of the Civil Rights movement. Knowing full well that she was risking her life, she participated in the celebrated voting rights march from Selma to Montgomery. Her presence so offended centuries-old southern mores that she was murdered by members of the Ku Kluc Klan. Historians believe she is the only white woman martyred in the cause of voting rights. The inspiring story of a truly remarkable woman [repeat at 1000] 0400-XXXX *KBYU SPECIAL: Dichterliebe by Robert Schumann: Classical 89 is pleased to present Dr. Lawrence P. Vincent, tenor, a Professor of Music and Director of Opera at Brigham Young University performing the romantic song-cycle, Dichterliebe by Robert Schumann. The poems are from "Das Buch der Lieder" by Heinrich Heine (1797 - 1856), slightly altered when set to music by Schumann in 1840. They tell the tale of love too oft unrequited. Many of the songs from this cycle display an intense involvement between the voices of the singer and the piano. A native-born Utahn, Dr. Vincent was awarded Austrian citizenship in 1994 for "extraordinary achievement in the Arts". Before returning to BYU he enjoyed a successful operatic stage career in Austria and Germany and performed solo concerts around the world [pre-empting Vocal Scene. Not in daily listings; geez, he`s off-mike] 0430-0445 *BBCWS HEART & SOUL: Modern Muslim Marriage: For many Muslims, marriage is the cornerstone of Islamic society. But courtship, marriage and divorce are all changing throughout the Islamic world. Navid Akhtar investigates 1350-1400 *KOSU Capitol Correspondent Ted Riley covers the teachers' rally at the Oklahoma State Capitol 1406-1500 *WMUB FREE ADVICE: The Latest in Home Electronics with WMUB Chief Engineer Jim Keen and Dayton Daily News columnist Don Loose 1505-1530 *BBCWe Discovery: In the second of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil such a successful nation for science and technology 1530-1600 *BBCWe Sports International: Advances in prosthetics have led to some extraordinary performances in disabled sport. Glenn Hicks asks how long will it be before elite disabled athletes and able-bodied compete together 1530-1600 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: The threat to the Hindu pilgrimage of Narmada Parikrama caused by the Narmada Dam scheme in the area 1630-1700 *BBCR4 MATERIAL WORLD: Simon Singh investigates a new generation of optical clocks which utilise laser technology to measure time 1,000 times more precisely than atomic timekeepers 1706-1900 *KQED FORUM with Michael Krasny: 15th Anniversary Special. KQED celebrates Forum's 15th anniversary and Michael Krasny's 10th anniversary as host with a special 2-hour broadcast in front of a live audience. 9am Scheduled Guests: Davia Nelson, half of The Kitchen Sisters, Independent Public Radio producers and creators of NPR's Lost and Found Sound Series and the Sonic Memorial Project; Ayelet Waldman, author of the Mommy-Track Mysteries; Eva Patterson, executive director of the Lawyers Committee on Civil Rights; Lowell Bergman, correspondent for the New York Times and Frontline; Mick LaSalle, author and San Francisco Chronicle Film Critic; Cynthia Gorney, associate professor at UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism; Kevin Starr, California State Librarian and author of several books about California. 10am Scheduled Guests: Sandra Hernandez, CEO of the San Francisco Foundation; Stewart Brand, inventor, designer and author; Saul Zaentz, founder of Fantasy Studios; Daniel Handler (aka Lemony Snicket), the author of the Lemony Snicket "An Unfortunate Series of Events" series; and Dr. Dean Ornish, clinical professor of medicine for the UCSF School of Medicine and founder and director of the Preventive Medicine Research Institute. 1830-1900 *BBCR4 BOOTHBY GRAFFOE IN NO PARTICULAR ORDER: The man who has been called 'the next Spike Milligan' is joined by top comedian Stephen Frost and actor Art Malik with music from Antonio Forcione 1930-2130 *BBCR3 PERFORMANCE ON 3: Monteverdi`s Orfeo from Barbican 2000-2030 *BBCR4 SPIES R US: History of CIA, 2 of 3: Losing friends, influencing no one: Vietnam 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Simpsons` 300th episode [or hour 1?] % 2105-2130 *BBCWa Discovery: In the second of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil such a successful nation for science and technology 2130-2200 *BBCWa Sports International: Advances in prosthetics have led to some extraordinary performances in disabled sport. Glenn Hicks asks how long will it be before elite disabled athletes and able-bodied compete together 2200-2230 *WBCQ PLANET WORLD NEWS ROUNDUP +7415 debut [NO SHOW] UT FRI FEBRUARY 14 FRIDAYS Sts. Cyril & Methodius India (Manipur) Lui-Ngai-Ni (Naga Festival) 0010-0100 *RA HINDSIGHT - social history: "The Morscodians". A look at the rich history of the forerunner of today's wired world, the electric telegraph, invented by Samuel Morse in 1832. We hear from former telegraph workers who are anxious to uphold their legacy and to keep Morse's Code alive % 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: The Poverty Lab. Bangladesh conjures up images of war, famine, and floods. But Western aid has greatly improved life there, even providing the internet to millions. Richard Phinney asks whether this is charity run riot or an answer to global poverty [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-XXXX *YPR Jackie Yamanaka and Jim Gransbery of the Billings Gazette provide an update on the Montana legislature U 0400-0500 *KQED Cleveland City Club Forum: Tom Capps, chairman and CEO of Dominion Energy, speaking on corporate corruption 0606-0800 *KQED FORUM with Michael Krasny 15th/10th anniversary special; see Thu 1706 of which this is a repeat 1200-1230 *RN DOCUMENTARY: Reporter Claire Kavanagh examines the timely issue of kissing.... a wry and sideways look at many people´s favourite subject !!!! [see DAY for repeats] +5965 1350-1400 *KOSU "Ramblin' 'Round" visits historic Ft. Gibson 1400-0100 *WQXR Valentine's Day Special: Ten hours of music for the romantically inclined – operatic arias, duets, and orchestral repertoire relating to amorous themes! 1500-1530 *BBCR4 RAMBLINGS: Clare Balding joins Parkinson's Disease sufferer Tom Isaacs between Barmouth and Aberdovey, as he nears the end of his 4,500-mile walk around Britain's coastline 1505-1700 *BBCWS News Special: Live coverage of Hans Blix, Executive Chairman of the UN Monitoring, Verification and Inspection Commission (UNMOVIC), and Mohamed El Baradei, Director- General of the International Atomic Energy Agency (IAEA) addressing the Security Council of the UN 1506-1600 *WPRi Jean Feraca: A look at the headlines of the Wisconsin State Journal in the last one hundred and fifty years, and read about the events that have impacted Wisconsin and the world 1515-XXXX *CBCR1 NEWS SPECIAL: Blix at the UNSC 1530-1600 *KUNM SOUTHWEST COFFEEHOUSE: True Loves 1600-XXXX *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House; University of Iowa Theatre Preview: This Valentine's Day edition will explore love and the human condition by previewing the drama, music, and poetry of two theatrical works opening in February at the University of Iowa. When A Streetcar Named Desire was first staged in 1947, it created a firestorm of controversy. Even today, Tennessee William's Pulitzer Prize-winning play still has the power to shock. Uncontrollable Mystery, three short plays by W.B. Yeats, highlights the great 20th century poet's unique ability to use fantasy, mysticism, and myth to examine the human condition. Live music by Dave Olson 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: George McGovern % 1700-1900 *WBGO Special: "A Love Supreme" - documentary on Coltrane`s classic recording 1900-XXXX *KCRW MORNING BECOMES ECLECTIC: Kronos Quartet live 1906-2000 *NPR TOTN SCIENCE FRIDAY: Preserving endangered species, live from AAAS Denver % [first hour pre-empted on some (all?) stations for NPR news special on Blix] 1930-XXXX *KBYU SPECIAL: Poet's Corner with Leslie Norris: KBYU-FM is honored to have G. Leslie Norris, Emeritus Professor of English at Brigham Young University present this special program of poetry about Valentine's Day collected from around the world. Observances of this special day vary among the cultures, as evidenced by these readings. Professor Norris himself is the author of fifteen books of poetry and two books of verse for children. He has won numerous awards for his sustained excellence as a writer, particularly of verse and fiction and has acquired a loyal following for his many public readings [rpt 0130] 2006-2100 *NPR TOTN SCIENCE FRIDAY: Legal restraints on scientists, live from AAAS Denver % 2030-2100 *BBCWe THE STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 2106-2200 *KQED FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: Fox broadcasts the 300th episode of The Simpsons this Sunday. Hear from the cartoon's creator, Matt Groening, Harry Shearer who does the voices of Mr. Burns and Smithers [and countless others], and Alf Clausen, who composes the music featured on the series 2200-2230 *BBCR2 DINO: THE DEAN MARTIN STORY, 1 of 6 2300-0100 *KSUI Know the Score LIVE! On this Valentine's Day program, we'll have Elizabethan lute songs performed by KSUI's own Nancy Hagen and lutenist Oleg Timofeyev. Timofeyev will also play gypsy music and tell us about his experiences living in Russia last year. Poetry of love and loss will be read by Know the Score's Poet-in-Residence Marvin Bell; we`ll explore love and virtue with Jay Semel and Russell Valentino; and we'll hear music for flute performed, and some composed, by new University of Iowa flute professor Robert Dick 2305-2320 *RA LINGUA FRANCA - about language. "Crazy English". The ABC's China correspondent John Taylor on the craze for learning English in China. In preparation for the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the Chinese government is encouraging all Chinese, young and old, to become fluent speakers of at least basic English. John Taylor attends one of the entrepreneurial EFL teacher Li Yang's 'Crazy English' lesson - joining a crowd of people who are encouraged to yell English. A taxi driver who has been learning English sentences from Government-supplied language tapes practises his English on John Taylor % [repeat at 0530] 2330-2400 *BBCR4 Days And Nights In Tootle Town: Barnsley poet Ian McMillan reports from the International Whistling Convention, held recently in Louisburg, North Carolina UT SAT FEBRUARY 15 SATURDAYS St. Onesimus 0130-XXXX *KBYU SPECIAL: Poet's Corner with Leslie Norris: KBYU-FM is honored to have G. Leslie Norris, Emeritus Professor of English at Brigham Young University present this special program of poetry about Valentine's Day collected from around the world. Observances of this special day vary among the cultures, as evidenced by these readings. Professor Norris himself is the author of fifteen books of poetry and two books of verse for children. He has won numerous awards for his sustained excellence as a writer, particularly of verse and fiction and has acquired a loyal following for his many public readings 0230-0300 *BBCWS THE STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 0306-0400 *WPRi Jean Feraca: A look at the headlines of the Wisconsin State Journal in the last one hundred and fifty years, and read about the events that have impacted Wisconsin and the world 0306-0400 *KQED FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: Fox broadcasts the 300th episode of The Simpsons this Sunday. Hear from the cartoon's creator, Matt Groening, Harry Shearer who does the voices of Mr. Burns and Smithers [and countless others], and Alf Clausen, who composes the music featured on the series 0400-0500 *KQED Commonwealth Club: Daniel Jonah Goldhagen, author of "Hitler's Willing Executioners: A Moral Reckoning." Harvard scholar Daniel Goldhagen tells us how and why he believes Catholics and the Catholic Church are morally culpable for the Holocaust. Elaborating on the bold statements and difficult truths of his landmark novels that have revolutionized Holocaust studies, he describes what this religion, representing love and goodness, must do to confront a history of hatred and harm to make amends with its victims 0406-0430 *BBCWS Debut: I`m Sorry I Haven`t a Clue, one of the most popular light entertainment shows on BBC Radio 4, makes its World Service debut after 30 years on the domestic service. The chairman/moderator, jazz trumpeter Humphrey Lytelton, gives four comedians silly things to do. Examples include singing one familiar song to the tune of another, giving misleading advice to visitors to Britain, a playing the game Morning Crescent – whose rules are a closely guarded secret and are subject to mysterious fluctuation 0530-0545 *RA LINGUA FRANCA - about language. "Crazy English". The ABC's China correspondent John Taylor on the craze for learning English in China. In preparation for the 2008 Beijing Olympics, the Chinese government is encouraging all Chinese, young and old, to become fluent speakers of at least basic English. John Taylor attends one of the entrepreneurial EFL teacher Li Yang's 'Crazy English' lesson - joining a crowd of people who are encouraged to yell English. A taxi driver who has been learning English sentences from Government-supplied language tapes practises his English on John Taylor % 1330-1400 *BBCWa The Music Feature: Desert Blues: Andy Kershaw travels to Timbuktu in the Sahara desert, to take part in one of the world's oldest music festivals. The festival sees the traditional gathering of the Touareg people, who sing gentle hypnotic songs about desert life, 2 of 2 1500-1600 *CBCR2 The Vinyl Cafe: Host Stuart McLean has a concert featuring the Legendary Kulele Brothers - a brace of ukulele virtuosi who will plunk and twang for you - plus the tale of how Morley joined a book club 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Pulpit, Politics And Prosperity: In the first of three programmes exploring the contribution of nonconformity to British life, Roy Hattersley, Jenny Uglow and the Reverend Dr Leslie Griffiths look at the political legacy of John Wesley 1800-2000 *BBCWS/NPR TALKING POINT: Call-in on Iraq [3-021] 2000-2100 *WLRN UNCOMMON COURAGE: Viola Liuzzo story 2000-2100 *BBCR4 ARCHIVE HOUR: The Liverpool Poets: In 1967, three young poets found fame with the publication of the anthology The Mersey Sound. Pete McCarthy looks at the work of Roger McGough, Adrian Henri and Brian Patten 2000-2200 *KCRW KRONOS QUARTET, Guest DJs 2005-2030 *BBCR3 MET OPERA QUIZ, time approx., also USA, CBC nets 2100-2200 *BBCR2 Nothing Compares To Her: The Sinéad O'Connor Story 2100-2200 *KQED DESTINATION FREEDOM: Black Radio Days UT SUN FEBRUARY 16 SUNDAYS Bangladesh Shaheed Dibosh Cyprus presidential elections; Fiji National Youth Day Korea North Kim Jong Il's Anniversary Lithuania Independence Day; Thailand Makha Bucha Day Moldova presidential elections 0200-0300 *WQXR CHAMBER MUSIC FROM KOSZCIUSKO FOUNDATION: cello/piano/qrt 0200-0300 *WOIa Third Coast International Audio Festival excerpts 0230-0300 *BBCWS Music Review: One World, One Sound: Christopher Cook presents a four-part investigation into the increasing uniformity of our music world. This week: Cross-over music comes under the spotlight - classical cellists play bluegrass; jazzmen play Mozart. Is this a good thing? 0300-0400 *WOIa Prairie Lights: "Central Standard" is Patrick Ireland's memoir of his childhood outside the rural hamlet of Bloomfield in southern Iowa. Ireland deftly uses his father's notebooks to recall his family's days working and moving on the Rock Island line 0500-0600 WRCR 1300 Spring Valley, NY MW DX special for NRC, code IDs 0600-0700 KING Soundtrack Cinema presents newly recorded suites from John Williams music for the Indiana Jones trilogy with the City of Prague Philharmonic Orchestra 1230-1300 *BBCR4 FOOD PROGRAMME: Food and Behaviour 1311-1600 *CBCR1 The Sunday Edition: Host Michael Enright takes the pulse of Europe's general disaffection with U-S sabre-rattling. He also vents his own unhappiness with the current state of movie palaces to Nuria Bronfman, a vice-president at Famous Players Theatres. Karin Wells reports on the volatile fortunes of Tony Blair, and in Hour Three, the start of a special week- long series called Cursed by Riches - The Congo Struggles to Survive. Despite living in a country rich in natural resources, more than 2.5 million people have died during four years of civil war. This is the forgotten war raging in the Democratic Republic of the Congo. The Sunday Edition begins this series with the feature documentary How Can a Country So Rich Be So Poor? [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1330-1400 *BBCR4 TIGER TALES: US relations with Philippines 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Private Passions: Michael Berkeley's guest is one of Britain's most successful young composers of music for film and TV. Stephen Warbeck won an Academy Award for his 1998 score for Shakespeare in Love, and his feature film credits since then include Billy Elliot, Captain Corellis Mandolin and Charlotte Gray. His music for the TV series Prime Suspect won a BAFTA nomination. He is Head of Music at the RSC, while also working at the other major London theatres including the National, the Royal Court and the Donmar Warehouse. His personal musical passions range from Messiaen, Eisler and Britten to Bob Dylan, Keith Jarrett and The Pogues 1500-1700 BFBS check newly reported 15530, timespan not clear 1605-1700 *CBCR1 The Vinyl Cafe: Host Stuart McLean has a concert featuring the Legendary Kulele Brothers - a brace of ukulele virtuosi who will plunk and twang for you - plus the tale of how Morley joined a book club [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1700-1745 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Chris de Souza unravels the web of hidden connections and symbols in Richard Strauss` study for strings Metamorphosen 1700-1800 *KGOU UNCOMMON COURAGE: THE VIOLA LIUZZO STORY 1745-1830 *BBCR3 Sunday Feature: Titian`s True Colours: On the eve of a major exhibition at the National Gallery in London, Lisa Jardine reassesses the work of Titian, painter of popes and princes, sensual nudes and dramatic mythological scenes. Titian's revolutionary approach to oil painting made him the most celebrated artist in sixteenth century Europe, with a lucrative international career, and friends ready to promote his work in high places 1800-1900 *KGOU American as Apple Pie: How Segregation and Terror Lost 1940-1954: This absorbing documentary demonstrates that equality under the law became viable for African Americans only after public opinion and federal policy had been turned against the white terror that enforced segregation and the denial of constitutional rights. 1800-1900 *KUNM FATHER TO SON: The Adam Clayton Powell story 1900-2000 *WILL MEDIA MATTERS: Norman Solomon, a highly respected journalist and media critic who has just returned from Baghdad. He has also just published a new book with Reese Erlich, entitled "Target Iraq: What the News Media Didn't Tell You." He has recently organized two delegations to Iraq, the first with Rep. Nick Rahall and others, and the second with Sean Penn. Norman Solomon is currently executive director of the Institute for Public Accuracy, a nationwide consortium of public- policy researchers. He is the author of "Media Beat," a nationally syndicated column on media and politics that appears in the San Francisco Examiner and other daily newspapers. A longtime associate of FAIR, he has written op-ed articles on media issues for many papers, including the Boston Globe, Washington Post, Newsday, New York Times, Miami Herald, Los Angeles Times, USA Today and Baltimore Sun 1905-2100 *CBCR2 OnStage presents a concert called Quartetto Gelato Rides the Orient Express. The highly-acclaimed musical ensemble offers up an eclectic feast of exotic musical delights, from Flanders and Swann's bittersweet tribute to The Slow Train, to Mendelssohn's Scherzo from A Midsummer Night's Dream, to Romanian and Turkish medleys [also CBCR1 Mon at 0105+++] 2000-2100 V. of Ethiopia debut, from where? 7560 [3-025] 2000-2200 *KBYU Celebrating the Past, Embracing the Future. A musical tribute to Dr. Martin Luther King, Jr., with the Choral Arts Society of Washington, the Heritage Signature Chorale, and the D.C. Boys Choir. This special features the world premiere of Full Freedom by Nicholas White." [or is it one hour] 2100-2200 *WPRi University of the Air: Bubbler or water fountain? Soda or pop? And what is a sky pilot anyway? Between three and four this afternoon, call in with your questions and ideas about the language we speak. Our guest will be the editor of the Dictionary of Regional English 2100-2200 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Ann Patchett, novelist and author of "Bel Canto" and "The Patron Saint of Liars." 2100-2300 *WHRB WORLD MUSIC: The Music of Dr. N. Rajam: After sampling musics from all around, we take an extended look at the music of Dr. N. Rajam, an eminent violinist and musicologist in North India, who has singlehandedly adapted a style of Khayal singing to her instrument, in the process inventing new ways of play in order to fully represent the range of vocal techniques in this complex style of Indian music 2105-2200 *CBCR2 Say It With Music: The new made-for-TV version of The Music Man debuts tonight, and Richard is here to give you a sneak preview of what it's going to sound like, with a program devoted to the latest soundtrack recording. Tony Award-winning stars Matthew Broderick and Kristin Chenoweth will bring you beloved songs such as Til There Was You, 76 Trombones and Good Night, My Someone. You'll also have a chance to win one of 10 copies of this CD that Richard will be giving away, if you succeed in answering some not-that-tricky questions about the show 2130-2200 *BBCR4 In Business: Taste Makers: Flavour means different things to different people. Peter Day meets the boffins who manipulate the taste of the foods we love and hate 2300-2400 *WBEZ ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Refuting the Bush Allegations on Iraq 2300-2400 *KCCU LAWTON PHILHARMONIC: Beethoven`s 9th Symphony UT MON FEBRUARY 17 MONDAYS St. Silvinius Alberta Family Day; Korea North Kim Jong Il's Anniversary Thailand Makha Bucha Day; USA President's Day 0000-0100 *WUOT Classically Black: Joseph Boulogne, Chevalier de Saint- Georges 0000-0100 *CAINAN Destination Freedom/Black Radio Days: Father to Son- Adam Clayton Powell 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILES: Dr. John Bancroft, Kinsey Sex Research 0000-0056 tvCBS 60 MINUTES: including Michael Moore [+1/3 hours by zone] 0000-0200 *WBEZ A LOVE SUPREME: Coltrane 0000-0300 tvABC THE MUSIC MAN, new TV Movie version [+1/3 hours by zone] 0015-0045 *BBCR4 Opening Nights: Fiddler On The Roof: Russell Davies traces the transformation of Sholom Aleichem's stories Tevye The Milkman into the block-busting musical Fiddler on The Roof which opened on Broadway in 1964 and ran for eight years. Recalling the crucial decisions along the way are lyricist Sheldon Harnick and composer Jerry Bock, together with those who took part in the show and the critics who saw it from the other side of the footlights 0059-0200 tvFOX THE SIMPSONS: 300th episode, and evidently, 301st [+1/3 hours depending on timezone] 0100-0300 *WFIU WORLD CHORAL SPECTACULAR 0105-0300 *CBCR1 OnStage: OnStage presents a concert called Quartetto Gelato Rides the Orient Express. The highly-acclaimed musical ensemble offers up an eclectic feast of exotic musical delights, from Flanders and Swann's bittersweet tribute to The Slow Train, to Mendelssohn's Scherzo from A Midsummer Night's Dream, to Romanian and Turkish medleys [+1/2/3 hours] 0100-0400 *WNYCa RADIO LAB: Ventures into Strip Club USA. Producer Helen Borten continues her exploration of the idea of "home," but this in Strip Clubs. We've all passed by those neon lit doors, covered in contact paper, with varying degrees of curiosity about what goes on inside, and inside the minds of those inside. Parts 1 and 2 of Strip Club USA [all 3 hours??] 0300-0400 *CAINAN Stephen Bright: Capital Punishment, Capital Crime 0300-0430 *WOIf University Concert: ISU Wind Ensemble, Golemo: Strauss: Vienna Philharmonic Fanfare; Reed: Armenian Dances; Gillingham: Concertino for Four Percussion and Wind Ensemble; King: Barnum and Bailey's Favorite; Cichy: Bugs 2000; Grainger: Lincolnshire Posy; Rimsky-Korsakov: Tsar Saltan: Flight of the Bumblebee 0400-0500 *KQED To the Best of Our Knowledge with Jim Fleming (Hour Two) "Lingua Franca." "My solid pigeon, that drape is a killer- diller, an E-flat Dillinger, a bit of a fly thing all on one page." Any idea what that means? It's hipster slang for "My, that's a nice dress you're wearing." In this hour, the roots of hipster slang - old movies, pulp novels and blues songs. Also, singer-songwriter John Wesley Harding - he says the lyrics always come first 0500-0600 *WBEZ PERFORMANCE SPACE: Jazz sax legend Wayne Shorter 0600-0700 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Dr. Moira Gunn speaks with Dr. Daniel Goleman, a clinical psychologist best-known for his book "Emotional Intelligence." His latest area of focus is destructive emotions: what are they, and how can we overcome them? The latest scientific evidence offers new insights. Moira will also speak with Po Bronson. The author of such techno- profiles as "The Nudist on the Late Shift," he spoke with nine hundred people to write "What Should I Do With My Life? The True Story of People Who Answered the Ultimate Question." 1230-1400 *CBCR1 THE CURRENT: Congo DR special, including R. Okapi [3-025] [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1405-1430 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans': Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. 3 of 4: Movies And Media 1506-1559 *NPR DIANE REHM: Preparing for terrorist attack % 1506-1559 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: with the national terrorism alert set on high, officials send us to buy plastic sheeting and bottled water. In the rush to the local hardware store, The Connection takes a look at fear, the media, the message and the politics of Code Orange 1530-1545 *BBCR4 Radio Poems: A Village of Water: By Sarah Maguire. A panoramic look at three communities in Kurdistan, Gaza and London begins a series of five specially commissioned poems on the theme of water 1530-1600 *BBCWe THE STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 1600-1630 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Food And Behaviour: Sheila Dillon investigates current scientific research into diet and antisocial behaviour. Could better nutrition offer an escape route from a life of crime? 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: The Real McCoy: Art reflects life as Edward Seckerson explores the musical's portrayal of real people. Fiorello LaGuardia, Fanny Brice, Coco Chanel, Georges Seurat and Gypsy Rose Lee strut their stuff in the Broadway limelight. With performances by Barbra Streisand, Ethel Merman and Katherine Hepburn 1606-1659 *NPR DIANE REHM: Bob Schieffer % 2130-2200 *BBCWa STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? UT TUE FEBRUARY 18 TUESDAYS St. Simeon Gambia Independence Day Turkmenistan President's Saparmurad Niyazov Birthday 0100-0200 *KGOU We Were Here: tribute to MLK 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: How Humans Invented Animals. For at least fifteen thousand years, humans have domesticated, selectively bred, genetically modified, factory farmed - and, recently, cloned - animals. Gilbert Reid visits Old MacDonald's farm [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 *MichR TODD MUNDT: Benefits of moderate wine consumption 0306-0359 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: with the national terrorism alert set on high, officials send us to buy plastic sheeting and bottled water. In the rush to the local hardware store, The Connection takes a look at fear, the media, the message and the politics of Code Orange 0400-0500 *KQED World Affairs Council: "20:21 Vision: Twentieth-Century Lessons for the Twenty-First Century." The speaker tonight is Bill Emmott, editor-in-chief of The Economist. Will the United States and capitalism, for all their strengths and weaknesses, continue to dominate, or will they be challenged in the 21st century? Emmott illuminates the global issues that mattered in the last century - and how the ways in which we dealt with them will shape our lives in the next 1230-1400 *CBCR1 THE CURRENT: [besides other previous topics] In the series "Cursed By Riches: The Congo Struggles to Survive," a look at Radio Okapi. Radio Okapi might be the only thing that makes peacekeeping in the Congo possible [instead of yesterday? +1/2/3/4 hours] 1330-1400 *BBCR4 The Real History Of Opera: Salomé: Huw Edwards uncovers the history and social context behind Richard Strauss's work, which reveals a disturbing snapshot of artistic values at the turn of the century 1405-1430 *BBCWe Meridian Masterpiece: Blockbusters, Burgers And Blue Jeans. Programme 3. Movies And Media: Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture 1530-1600 *BBCWa STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 1900-2230 *BBCR2 various music series; see DAY 2005-2030 *BBCWa Meridian Masterpiece: Blockbusters, Burgers And Blue Jeans. Programme 3. Movies And Media: Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture 2030-2130 *BBCR2 The Sound Of The Movies: Author and film expert Brian Sibley begins a new four-part series tracing the story of music in the cinema since it first made an appearance, in The Jazz Singer, over seventy-five years ago. With contributions from eminent film composers including Lalo Schifrin, Rachel Portman and Danny Elfman, Brian Sibley explores the way music has been used to create a mood, conjure a time or place, or simply to underscore the action. Scoring The Silence: In the early days of silent cinema, music was sometimes played on the set to help actors get into the mood of a scene. When the resulting films were screened, audiences watched them with live piano, organ or orchestral accompaniment. Every film begins as simple pictures without music; it is the addition of the score that creates a powerful extra dimension, drawing viewers into a deeper engagement with the images before them. 2300-2330 *BBCR4 The Mark Steel Lecture: humorous lectures about historical figures. This week it's the lowdown on Hannibal, the Carthaginian warrior who trekked across the Alps with 37 elephants UT WED FEBRUARY 19 WEDNESDAYS St. Conrad Armenia presidential elections; Nepal Democracy Day Turkmenistan Flag Day 0100-0200 *MichR TODD MUNDT: underside of the cruise industry 0100-0200 *WCPN Destination Freedom/Black Radio Days "Father to Son" This drama tells the story of Adam Clayton Powell Sr., a sharecropper who escaped crushing poverty in West Virginia to lead one of the largest and oldest churches in America - Harlem's Abyssinian Baptist Church. The program also profiles Powell's son, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., who was repeatedly returned to the U.S. House of Representatives by the people of Harlem 0200-0300 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: Kentucky was the third state in the country to have a public dental health program... it launched this initiative in 1928. And in 1951, Maysville became the first community in the Commonwealth to flouridate its water supply. Today, 96% of our citizens drink fluoridated water. But oral health still remains a concern in Kentucky, mainly because of access to oral hygiene education, tools, and fluoridated water in more rural areas. We discuss oral health issues including geography, tobacco use, and ways to improve oral health in the Commonwealth 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: SHERWIN NULAND is Clinical Professor of Surgery at Yale School of Medicine, a truly outstanding surgeon and medical historian, a prolific author-—and one of the best guests we have had on Extension 720 over the years. He is back tonight for the full two hours to discuss his own fascinating life. While Nuland's previous books include 'How We Die' and How We Live,' his latest is a memoir Lost in America: A Journey with My Father. % 0400-0500 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Ann Patchett, novelist and author of "Bel Canto" and "The Patron Saint of Liars [rpt at 1000] 0530-0600 *KUOW Beyond War: Part 1 (of 6) War Without End: What explains the increasing rate of civilian casualties in war? What does it mean, for soliders - and for their targets - to drop a bomb or fire high-powered weapons of destruction? What values and beliefs motivate soldiers? What other agendas bring about war? Humankind premieres the first installment of a documentary series entitled, "Beyond War" asking the question: Is war a necessary evil - or total madness? 1506-1600 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: The issue of Science and Security is discussed. Editors of leading research journals say they'll now consider national security when deciding what to publish. Public protection -- or self-censorship? [repeat at 0306] 1600-1630 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed With Laurie Taylor: From panacea to global disease, how we view tobacco has changed profoundly over the centuries. A new investigation, Why People Smoke, suggests the social and psychological factors involved are at least as important as their biological counterparts. 1606-1700 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: As the fighting in Colombia heats up, foreigners are getting caught in the fray. A journalist who was abducted about her time in captivity, and about why she'll still go back to Bogota [repeat at 0406] 1630-1700 *BBCR4 All In The Mind: Dr Raj Persaud examines the world of the chronically shy. Why are some people gregarious and confident, while others hang back, painfully inhibited? What is going on in the shy person's brain during social interactions to cause such discomfort? Can shy children be prevented from becoming shy adults? Or is shyness a perfectly acceptable expression of personality which society should embrace, instead of relentlessly applauding the opposite? 2005-2030 *BBCWe Discovery: In the last of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil the most succesful nation in South America when it comes to science and technology 2100-2130 *BBCR4 AN EARTH MADE FOR LIFE 2200-2230 *BBCR2 MASTERS OF ROCK: 1970 UT THU FEBRUARY 20 THURSDAYS St. Eleutherius 0100-0130 tvPBS MARK RUSSELL COMEDY SPECIAL [original ET/CT airing] 0100-0200 *WCPN Destination Freedom/Black Radio Days "Housing" and "Diary of a Nurse." Set in Chicago in the late 1940s, the dramatization "Housing" exposes how the system kept African Americans trapped in housing designed to profit at their expense. "Diary of a Nurse" tells the story of Jane Edna Hunter, a nurse and founder of the National Phyllis Wheatley Association. The segment tells how Hunter defied social and economic odds to build a housing sanctuary for women in Cleveland 0200-XXXX *Lannan Live Webcast: Do You Hear What I`m Seeing -- the life and works of James Joyce, David Norris http://www.lannan.org [Quicktime only] 0205-0230 *BBCWS Discovery: In the last of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil the most succesful nation in South America when it comes to science and technology 0306-0400 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: The issue of Science and Security is discussed. Editors of leading research journals say they'll now consider national security when deciding what to publish. Public protection -- or self-censorship? 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE NEW CARS: GEMS AND LEMONS: The Chicago Auto Show is in full swing and, if you are still in the market for a new car, you've come to the right spot. JIM MATEJA of The Chicago Tribune and JOE WIESENFELDER of cars.com take a few hours out of their exhaustive coverage of everything in the world of cars to join us, and are more than ready to reveal the coming year's best and worst to our listeners 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: "Destination Freedom/ Black Radio Days": An exceptional broadcast series created by African American writers in the 1940s and '50s to portray blacks and black life realistically and positively. Hosted by acclaimed musician, actor and composer Oscar Brown Jr. This week, "Housing," a dramatization that exposes how restrictive covenants and outright violence help millions of blacks trapped in housing conditions guaranteed to produce ill health and wide profit margins; and "Diary of a Nurse," a program that tells the story of Jane Edna Hunter, nurse and founder of the National Phyllis Wheatly Association, a housing sanctuary for women in Cleveland 0406-0500 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: As the fighting in Colombia heats up, foreigners are getting caught in the fray. A journalist who was abducted about her time in captivity, and about why she'll still go back to Bogota [repeat at 0406] 1505-1530 *BBCWe Discovery: In the last of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil the most succesful nation in South America when it comes to science and technology 1506-1559 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: When it comes to Iraq, there's steady focus on tensions between the United States, the United Nations, the old and new Europe. But little on the region where the war matters most. On The Connection after nine, testing the temperature of the Arab states [rpt at 0306] 1606-1659 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: For many, deprived of serotonin and greenery, winter is the season for grouchiness and sloth. Others find life below zero temps and snow brings creativity, romance and spiritual growth. On The Connection after ten, examining the soul of the season [rpt at 0406] 1606-1659 *NPR DIANE REHM: Lisa Jardine: On a Grander Scale (Harper Collins) --- Renaissance historian Lisa Jardine discusses her new book about 17th-century architect Sir Christopher Wren and his transformation of London % 1630-1700 *BBCR4 The Material World: There are over 100 000 pieces of space debris orbiting Earth. Pieces of derelict spacecraft, bits of launch vehicles and even tiny flecks of paint travel at thousand of kilometres per hour causing huge damage to spacecraft. In thirty years time the amount of rubbish could double. Simon Singh talks to Graham Swinerd from Southampton University who is looking to the future to try and predict the path of space junk. Simon also finds out how roving vehicles attached to space tethers could soon be acting as 'space sheepdogs' to herd the rubbish out of harms way and out of Earth's orbit 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Detention and deportation of Muslims from America % 1706-1800 *KQED FORUM: Forum holds a panel discussion on the efforts to recall California Governor Gray Davis. Guests: Darrell Steinberg, assembly member (D-Sacramento); Carl Burton, assistant to the CEO of People's Advocate; Bruce Cain, director of the Institute of Governmental Studies at UC Berkeley and Robinson Professor of Political Science; Bob Stern, president of the Center for Governmental Studies and principle co-author of the Political Reform Act of 1974; and David Binder, pollster, political analyst, and CEO of David Binder Research 1806-1900 *KQED FORUM: Forum talks with author Gary Snyder and illustrator Tom Killion about their book "The High Sierra of California." Snyder, a poet, has published sixteen books of poetry and prose, including "The Gary Snyder Reader (1952- 1998)" and "Turtle Island," which won the Pulitzer Prize in 1974, and is professor of English at UC Davis. Killion, a woodcut and letterpress artist, is the founder of The Quail Press, and his extensively illustrated books include "28 Views of Mount Tamalpais," "The Coast of California," and "Walls: A Journey Across Three Continents." 2000-2030 *BBCR4 SPIES R US: History of CIA, 3 of 3: To Kill Is To Survive: Tom Mangold presents a three-part history of the CIA. A focus on the CIA's role in the fight against terrorism 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: new attempt to get liberal voices on talk radio % 2030-2100 *BBCWe A Fresh Start For Africa: Documentary series focusing on Africa in the new century and whether it can escape from its history of poverty and conflict 2100-2130 *BBCR4 LEADING EDGE: Biometric security 2105-2130 *BBCWa Discovery: In the last of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil the most succesful nation in South America when it comes to science and technology UT FRI FEBRUARY 21 FRIDAYS St. Peter Damian 0030-0230 *WQXR NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC LIVE: Riccardo Muti conducts Rota's Concerto for Strings, Haydn's Symphony No. 94, "Surprise," and Tchaikovsky's Symphony No. 3, "Polish." 0100-0300 *CBCR2 IN PERFORMANCE: The Toronto Consort presents soprano Suzie Leblanc and harpsichordist Alexander Weimann in a program called The Songbird. The concert features the rarely performed music of 16th century composer Francesca Caccini, along with her influences and teachers 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: The Last Bohemian. Bob Chelmick makes a pilgrimage to San Francisco to find the grand old man of American Beat poetry, Lawrence Ferlinghetti, whose work lit up the Sixties 0230-0300 *BBCWS A Fresh Start for Africa is a new three-part 30-minute documentary series looking at the New African Initiative – a continent-wide development plan recently drawn up by African leaders. The program looks at the recent history of Africa since the independence movements of the 1950s and 1960s, the regional conflicts, and a guardedly optimistic viewpoint arising on the continent. Repeated Mondays, 1530 0306-0359 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: When it comes to Iraq, there's steady focus on tensions between the United States, the United Nations, the old and new Europe. But little on the region where the war matters most. On The Connection after nine, testing the temperature of the Arab states 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE BOOKS OF THE QUARTER: Another edition of our quarterly book review program is upon us. Milt has challenged our panelists ALAN GITELSON, PENELOPE MESIC, and DAN TUCKER with a wide array of recent works in history, biography, science, religious studies, and the arts, plus several works of fiction. John Ruskin wrote: "All books are divisible into two classes, the books of the hour, and the books of all time." We'll see if any of tonight's choices reach into the latter category or if our show becomes, to paraphrase Logan Pearsall Smith, "the gilded tomb of mediocre talent." 0400-0500 *KQED Cleveland City Club Forum: Molly Ivins, a nationally syndicated columnist. She will be speaking about "Politics and the Art of Deception [rpt at 1000] 0406-0459 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: For many, deprived of serotonin and greenery, winter is the season for grouchiness and sloth. Others find life below zero temps and snow brings creativity, romance and spiritual growth. On The Connection after ten, examining the soul of the season 1300-1400 *BBCR3 Lunchtime Concert: Sandy Burnett introduces Glasgow University's newly appointed Gardiner Professor of Music in a programme of characteristic virtuosity. Handel: Organ concerto in G minor (Op.4, No.1) Mozart: Sonata in C (K.326); Andante in F (K616); Sonata in C (K.336); Handel: Organ concerto in D minor (Op.7, No.4) 1400-1600 *BBCR3 BBC Orchestras: BBC Philharmonic: Chabrier: Espana; Ravel: Pavane pour une infante defunte; Poulenc: Organ Concerto in G minor; Messiaen: Turangalila Symphony:: The work is very influenced by Hindu music and thought, and pre-empts the importance of non-western music to many of today's composers. The intriguing title has many meanings including song of love, life and death, time, movement, rhythm, and hymn to joy. 1505-1530 *BBCWa Discovery: In the last of three programmes, Julian Siddle finds out what makes Brazil the most succesful nation in South America when it comes to science and technology 1506-1600 *WPRi Jean Feraca and her guests discuss an infamous event in Duluth's history [lynching]. They'll also discuss how the community came together to build a Memorial for victims of this tragedy [repeat at 0306][NOT; subject changed; see 0306] 1530-1600 *BBCWe A Fresh Start For Africa: Documentary series focusing on Africa in the new century and whether it can escape from its history of poverty and conflict 1530-1600 *KUNM FRIDAY FORUM: Pew Global Attitudes Survey 1600-1630 *BBCR4 Law In Action: Marcel Berlins explores the legal issues of the day. The US fast food industry is facing multiple law suits from people alleging that it is responsible for making them fat. But should those who voluntarily ate high calorie meals be entitled to sue? And will obesity compensation appear on the British menu too? 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Jazz Legends: Nina Simone: Julian Joseph celebrates the career of the American vocalist, composer and pianist, who is 70 today. Selections include her hit records I Loves You Porgy and I Put A Spell On You 1606-1700 *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House: Hollywood Cowboys Revisit the Old West of the silver screen with guests of the Hollywood Cowboys exhibition at the Herbert Hoover Presidential Library and Museum. Singer-songwriter/cowboy actor Johnny Western will perform live and share his thoughts on westerns along with movie and TV director Earl Bellamy. Joining them will be University of Iowa Associate Professor Corey Creekmur, author of the forthcoming book Cattle Queens and Lonesome Cowboys: Gender and Sexuality in the Western 1606-1700 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: For centuries, Asian cultures have recognized green tea as one of nature's most powerful healers. Jean Feraca's guest will introduce us to the culinary use of green tea, which, as we'll discover, is not only healthful, but very flavorful. Guest: Ying Chang Compestine, a regular contributor to Cooking Light, Self, and Men's Health [repeat at 0406][NOT: replaced by rerun] 1806-1900 *KQED Forum: with Friday Forum host Angie Coiro: one-on-one with author Norman Mailer. Mailer is the author of "The Naked and the Dead," "The Executioner's Song," and most recently, "The Spooky Art: Thoughts on Writing." 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Is hydrogen a viable solution to our country's energy problems? Some people think it is, but even enthusiasts admit that a true hydrogen economy is still years away. We will discuss the prospects for living in a hydrogen- fueled world % 2030-2100 *BBCWe STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 2130-2200 *BBCWa A Fresh Start For Africa: Documentary series focusing on Africa in the new century and whether it can escape from its history of poverty and conflict 2300-2400 *WFMU Aerial View with Chris T: a special interview with the people behind the independent documentary "Horns and Halos". The film examines the rise and fall of "Fortunate Son", the first published biography of George W. Bush. At the time of its recall, the book was #8 on amazon.com's best-seller list, no doubt due to its widely-publicized allegations that Bush had been arrested for cocaine possession in 1972. "Fortunate Son" author, J. H. Hatfield, killed himself after immense negative pressure from Bush's protectors. Michael Galinsky, Suki Hawley, and Sander Hicks of Soft Skull Press will discuss the genesis of the project and unravel details of this bizarre story 2306-2400 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: Host Dave Berkman takes a look at the war currently being waged by cable news operations. Dave's guest is an editor at the Columbia Journalism Review, Neil Hickey UT SAT FEBRUARY 22 SATURDAYS Afghanistan Mount Arafat Day; Kuwait Mount Arafat Day Malta referendum; Saint Lucia Independence Day Syrian Arab Republic Day of Unity 0100-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: From Trinity St. Paul's Centre in Toronto, Tafelmusik Baroque Orchestra presents an eclectic mix of cultures in a program called The Four Seasons: a Cycle of the Sun. Tafelmusik plays Vivaldi's Four Seasons, and also shares the stage with virtuoso performers from China, India and Nunavut 0200-0300 *WBEZ AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Music for the Oud 0230-0300 *BBCWS STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 0300-0500 *WBEZ PASSPORT: Music of Italy 0306-0400 *WPRi Jean Feraca and her guests discuss an infamous event in Duluth's history [lynching]. They'll also discuss how the community came together to build a Memorial for victims of this tragedy [NOT! A rerun replaced in later revision:] From the future birthplace of Captain Kirk, to the Elvis is Alive Museum...Jean Feraca's guest after nine takes us on a tour of eccentric America. Join Jean and her guest for a look at the more unusual tourist sites the US has to offer. Guest: Jan Friedman, author of Eccentric America Rebroadcast from 5/30 0306-0400 *KWMU THE CONNECTION: Tan Dun's Musical Map: Composing tiger, cello-playing dragon. The musical duo of Tan Dun and Yo-Yo Ma join forces again, performing Tan Dun's bold new composition, The Map. They'll join us to discuss the work and its celebration of China's Hunan region 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE PSYCHOLOGY OF MOTHERHOOD: Our guest tonight is JANNA MALAMUD SMITH, author of A Potent Spell : The Power of Motherhood Fears. In it, Smith (who is herself the mother of two) argues that the traditional protective instincts of a mother for her child have been (and continue to be) harmfully manipulated in American society. The result is an atmosphere in which mothers are under constant pressures to account for their children's lives while receiving few societal rewards in return, all to the detriment of both mother and child 0400-0500 *KQED Commonwealth Club: David Rockefeller. The man whose last name has become almost synonymous with the City of New York, David Rockefeller, the youngest son of the late John D. Rockefeller, Jr., shares highlights from his life - from working as secretary to Mayor LaGuardia of New York City, to becoming a captain in the U.S. Army, to being a world-renowned banker. In conversation with Mary Bitterman [ex-VOA director], president and CEO of the James Irvine Foundation, the famous philanthropist discusses his personal involvement with the Rockefeller Center, the Museum of Modern Art, and the building of the World Trade Center [rpt at 1000] 0430-0527 tvHBOE REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER debut live 0530-0600 tvHBOE DA ALI G SHOW debut, 1 of 6 0606-0700 *KQED Forum has a one-on-one with author Norman Mailer. Mailer is the author of "The Naked and the Dead," "The Executioner's Song," and most recently, "The Spooky Art: Thoughts on Writing." 1300-1400 *BBCR3 WORLD ROUTES: In the second of three programmes, Lucy Duran and Viram Jasani continue their musical tour of North India. This week they visit Rikhi Ram & Sons music shop in New Delhi. Renowned throughout the world, they still hand craft sitars for all the leading Indian masters: their customers have included Ravi Shankar, Vilayat Khan, and The Beatles. Plus, Lucy and Viram pay homage to the shrine of Nizam Uddin Auliya, the famous Sufi philosopher, and are treated to an authentic Qawali performance during afternoon prayers by the Nizami Brothers. And, leaving Delhi behind they make their way south, where they hear the extraordinary singing boys of Rajasthan in the middle of this vast and magical desert landscape 1330-1400 *BBCWa The Music Feature: Don't Touch That Dial Returns with a new series, visiting six more countries: Russia, Lebanon, Singapore, South Africa, Spain and New Zealand, highlighting local music and DJs 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Pulpit, Politics And Prosperity: Valentine Cunningham continues his journey in search of the legacy of nonconformist Britain. He looks at the influence of the Quaker firm, Huntley and Palmers, on the city of Reading. Then News 1900-1920 *BBCR3 MET OPERA INTERVAL: New York Artists In Their Studios: Tim Marlow talks to Spencer Tunick, who uses the urban landscape as a backdrop for his nude photographs. [time approx.; OPERA NEWS ON THE AIR on US+ networks?] 2000-2100 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: The Big Ear: Leo Enright tells the story of the radio telescope at Jodrell Bank in Cheshire which has been at the forefront of astronomical research and the centre of scandals and intrigue 2000-2100 *WLRN MEET ALL YOUR FINE FRIENDS: DEW DROP INN IN NEW ORLEANS 2000-2100 *KQED This American Life: "Come Back to Afghanistan." Last summer, a seventeen-year-old who grew up in California travelled with his father to their home country, Afghanistan. He'd never been. He'd been thinking maybe someday he'd do something big to help Afghanistan rebuild, maybe become a politician, or an engineer. Going to Afghanistan and seeing the troubles there firsthand forced him to think through what that would mean. His audio diaries were produced by Susan Burton. (Orig scheduled for Feb 1, 2003) 2100-2200 *KQED Radio Specials: "Destination Freedom/ Black Radio Days." An exceptional broadcast series created by African American writers in the 1940s and '50s to portray blacks and black life realistically and positively. Hosted by acclaimed musician, actor and composer Oscar Brown Jr. This week, "Father to Son." This drama tells the story of Adam Clayton Powell Sr., a sharecropper who escaped crushing poverty to lead one of the largest and oldest churches in America: Harlem's Abyssinian Baptist Church. It also profiles his son, Adam Clayton Powell Jr., who was repeated returned to the U.S. House of Representatives by the people of Harlem 2100-2200 *BBCR2 Startime! follows the career of the most important star to come out of Black America, told through the stories of the albums that capture him live on stage at three crucial turning points in his career. The triumvirate of albums known as, James Brown Live At The Apollo, Volumes 1, 2 and 3 [1 of ?] 2100-2125 *BBCR3 The Met Opera Quiz: Opera buffs tackle musical teasers submitted by listeners. Brian Zeger puts tonight's puzzles to Cori Ellison, Sarah Bryan Miller and Christopher Purdy. [time approx.; also US and other networks] 2135-2145 *DW DX PROGRAM monthly 2200-0100 *WFUV Mixed Bag with Pete Fornatale - For George Washington`s Birthday, songs about our 43 Presidents 2335-2345 *DW DX PROGRAM monthly UT SUN FEBRUARY 23 SUNDAYS Brunei Darussalam Independence Day Guinea-Bissau presidential elections; Guyana Republic Day India Charter Party Holiday, Calicut Russia Defence of the Motherland; Tajikistan Army's Day 0200-0300 *WOIa First Person: Speaking of Faith --- Spirituality & Sexuality: Recently, our national attention has been riveted on sexual scandal in the Catholic Church. On this new hour of Speaking of Faith, host Krista Tippet cracks open the difficult subject of religion and sexuality 0200-0330 *WQXR On Wings of Song: Lauren Skuce, Soprano [or -0300?] 0235-0245 *DW DX PROGRAM monthly 0306-0510 *KCSCf NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: Leonard Slatkin Conductor: Respighi Ancient Airs and Dances, Suite No. 3; Haydn Symphony No. 94, "Surprise" Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 3, "Polish" 0400-0500 *WHYY AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Oud 1330-1400 *BBCR4 TIGER TALES: Chris Gunness presents the series on modern Asian history. This edition recalls the Japanese occupation of Korea, which began in 1910 and lasted until the end of the second World War 1601-1700 *BBCWS International Recital returns for its 18th series, with six concerts which combine the best of classical and traditional music from across the world. The third concert features the celebrated Chilingirian Quartet [what kind of quartet?] 1700-1740 *BBCR4 FILE ON 4: Julian O'Halloran investigates Britain's emergency preparations and asks why those on the frontline are complaining about low morale, falling budgets and Whitehall complacency 1700-1745 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Cossack dances, accordions, folk rituals, all sounds which seem to ricochet around Shostakovich's Cello Concerto (Op. 107). Gerard McBurney takes an in-depth look at the work with the help of specially- recorded musical illustrations performed by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, Paul Watkins (cello), Peter Stark (conductor). Listen out for a complete performance in Performance On 3 at 1930 on Thursday 1700-1800 *KGOU American RadioWorks: Oh Freedom Over Me: During the summer of 1964, southern civil rights leaders invited northern students to Mississippi to expose the state's fiercely segregated society. This peaceful assault -- in which thousands placed themselves in the violent path of racism - became known as Freedom Summer 1745-1830 *BBCR3 Sunday Feature: "The problem of the Twentieth Century is the problem of the color-line". These prophetic words were written by W. E. B. Du Bois in his 1903 seminal collection of essays entitled The Souls Of Black Folk. This pioneering work incorporated fiction, history, sociology and song. Having read Macaulay's History Of England at the age of 14 Du Bois went on, in this extraordinarily rich collection, to write a seminal portrait of America in crisis. On the centenary of its publication eminent writer and cultural theorist Professor Stuart Hall assesses the lasting legacy of The Souls Of Black Folk and examines the many complexities in Du Bois' life from scholar to civil rights activist to his last days in Ghana as a communist exiled from an America where he had become virtually persona non grata 1800-1900 *KUNM AMERICAN RADIO WORKS Oh Freedom Over Me, Mississippi voting 1800-1900 *KGOU American RadioWorks: Radio Fights Jim Crow: Before Rosa Parks' historic refusal to give up her bus seat and before the famous freedom marches of mid-century, African Americans fought racial discrimination through the most influential mass medium of the 1930s and 40s - radio 1830-2000 *WPRm LIVE FROM THE ELVEHJEM: Pro Arte Quartet: Haydn: String Quartet in Bb, op 1/1; Zemlinsky: String Quartet #3; Mendelssohn: String Quartet #1 in Eb, op 12 1900-2000 *WILL MEDIA MATTERS: Michael Copps (D.), dissident FCComissioner 1905-2000 *CBCR1 Tapestry: Abraham: It's been said that Abraham is the father of three great religions - Judaism, Christianity and Islam. Guest host Nelofer Pazira - star of the highly- acclaimed film "Kandahar" - explores the truth and the fiction surrounding Abraham with author Bruce Feiler. [+1 in CST] 2000-2200 *KCRW "A Love Supreme," a documentary special about John Coltrane's seminal work of art and spirituality, hosted by Mos Def 2005-2100 *CBCR1 Writers and Company: This week on Writers and Company, the beginning of a new series, Writing in the World of Islam: from Iraq to Egypt, Turkey, Lebanon and the Sudan, remarkable authors with a sensibility, perspective, and quality you don't often hear about. This week, Tayeb Salih, the great Sudanese author. Culturally as well as geographically, Salih embraces the East and the West: his fiction draws on both European and classical Arabic literary traditions as well as the rich literature of Islam and Sufism 2106-2200 *WPRi University of the Air: discover a remarkable story-telling tradition, as we devote an hour to the epics of Central Asia 2130-2200 *BBCR4 In Business: Big Lou: Lou Gerstner is the man who saved the computer giant IBM, known in the trade as 'Big Blue'. Peter Day hears from the horse's mouth how he did it 2300-2400 *WGBH ARTS & IDEAS: Recollections by civil rights leaders of the 1940s and '50s, both famous and obscure 2300-2400 *WBEZ America Abroad — Iraq: Context of a Crisis (PRI) 2330-2400 *BBCR4 SOMETHING UNDERSTOOD: Degree Of Remoteness: Indian-born Birmingham poet Roshan Doug explores his own journey to define his cultural identity through poetry, prose and music. UT MON FEBRUARY 24 MONDAYS St. Matthias Brazil Carnival (during 5 days from this date on) Estonia Independence Day 0000-0030 *WBEZ Does War Give Us Meaning? (Cambridge Forum): War correspondent and author Chris Hedges discuss his new book on the psychology of war. Drawing on over 15 years covering wars around the globe, he looks at war as disease, how it infects and intoxicates as societies are swept up in its call to action 0015-0045 *BBCR4 Opening Nights: Russell Davies looks at the stories behind the opening nights of well known musicals. 2. The Phantom Of The Opera premiered in London in 1986 with Michael Crawford as The Phantom and Sarah Brightman as Christine. It is still in production today and gave Andrew Lloyd Webber the distinction of being the first composer to have three musicals running simultaneously in London and New York 0030-0100 *WBEZ Love And War (PRI) This documentary by Helen Borten is a candid and intimate portrait of professional soldiers trying to combine the disparate worlds of love and war 0100-0200 *WBEZ New Chicago Architecture (Chicago Public Radio) 0100-0200 *WCNY Orgelwerke with Bonnie Beth Derby: A HANDEL BIRTHDAY FESTIVAL. Born on this date in 1685. Included will be a March (for organ and orchestra); the Organ Concerto No. 4 in F, Op. 4 and the "Arrival of the Queen of Sheba" from "Solomon" (arranged for two organists). Also offered: several fugues and a transcription for two organists of the chorus "For Unto Us a Child is Born" from "Messiah" as performed on an instrument believed to have been played by Handel himself located at St. James' Chapel, Great Packington, England 0306-0400 *KQED To the Best of Our Knowledge with Jim Fleming: Hour One: "I'm Sorry." In this hour, one man's attempt to apologize for the sins of his family's past. Also, mizuko kuyo, the Japanese ritural ceremony of apology to aborted fetuses. What does it mean to say "I'm sorry." 0400-0500 *KUSC THORNTON CENTER STAGE: Stephen Hartke at 50: The Horse with the Lavender Eye Episodes for Violin, Clarinet & Piano; Gradus (West Coast Premiere); Tituli (American Premiere) 0406-0500 *KQED To the Best of Our Knowledge with Jim Fleming: Hour Two: "The Last Laugh." In India he's known as the giggling guru. In America, Dr. Kataria is famous in certain circles as the man who founded Laughter Yoga. In this hour, the man who's changing the world with chuckles, chortles and belly laughs. And, why more and more people believe laughter really is the best medicine. Also, a look at the soul of wit. And, why one man claims women don't tell jokes 0500-0600 *WYSO DOCUMENTARIES: Uncommon Courage: Viola Liuzzo Story 0600-0700 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Stephen J. Cannell, the longtime television producer and Chairman of Cannell Studios. We'll hear why Hollywood screenplays are printed on red paper, and about how successful screenplays can be written by everyday people. Moira will also speak with Michael D'Orso. He's written about those desolated and deserted islands off the coast of Ecuador called the Galapagos 0820-0917 tvHBOE REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER 1230-1400 *CBCR1 The Current: Today on The Current...Dearborn, Michigan has the largest concentration of Arab-Americans in the United States. Anna Maria Tremonti travels to Dearborn to find out what life is like for Arab- Americans 18 months after September 11th - and as Washington pushes for war in Iraq. She'll look at the division between loyalty to the U-S and family or friends in the Middle East, the curtailment of civil liberties, and how people are living with those tensions [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1400-1500 *WMUB Interconnect with John Hingsbergen and Cheri Lawson: The Spirituality and Philosophy of the Anti-War Movement Guests: Dr. Phil Shriver, President Emeritus of Miami University; Dr Lonnie Valentine, Associate Professor of Peace and Justice Studies, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana; also at least one representative of student peace groups [repeat at 0000] 1405-1430 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans', Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. 4 pg 4: Mass Fashion 1506-1559 *NPR DIANE REHM: U.S.-Turkey Relations: Diane leads a discussion about the relationship between the U.S. and Turkey: U.S. aid to Turkey, Turkey's military and strategic importance to the U.S, and how Turkey is juggling its domestic, regional and international interests. Bulent Alizira, senior associate and director of the Turkey Project at the Center for Strategic and International Studies W. Patrick Lang, former Defense Intelligence Agency official % 1506-1559 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: How the threat of war in Iraq, a strike in Venezuela, and a refueling mishap on Staten Island have helped push oil prices ever higher [repeat at 0306] 1530-1600 *BBCWe STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 2 of 2 1530-1600 *BBCWa A Fresh Start for Africa is a new three-part 30-minute documentary series looking at the New African Initiative – a continent-wide development plan recently drawn up by African leaders. The program looks at the recent history of Africa since the independence movements of the 1950s and 1960s, the regional conflicts, and a guardedly optimistic viewpoint arising on the continent. Repeat of Fri 0230 1600-1630 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Authenticity: To create authentic French or Italian cuisine, must the ingredients come from those countries? Sheila Dillon investigates 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: Cultural Exchange: Edward Seckerson explores musicals that feature foreigners, including 50 Million Frenchmen and The Mikado 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Impact of Internet on Authoritarian Rule: Guest: Shanthi Kalathil, Carnegie Endowment for International Peace. In their book Open Networks, Closed Regimes, Shanthi Kalathil and Taylor C. Boas look at Internet content and use in countries such as China, Cuba, Burma and Saudi Arabia. Their conclusion is that the Internet is not inherently a threat to authoritarian regimes. We will discuss how certain regimes manipulate the availability and use of the Internet by their citizens % 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): Forum discusses the news media's coverage of Iraq. Guests: Norman Soloman, executive director of the Institute for Public Accuracy and co-author of "Target Iraq: What the News Media Didnt Tell You"; Matthew A. Baum, assistant professor of political science and communications at UCLA, and Mark Tapscott, Marilyn and Fred Guardabassi Fellow and director of the Center for Media & Public Policy at the Heritage Foundation 1800-1900 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Gen. J.R. (Jack) Dailey, chairman, U.S. Centennial of Flight Commission & Director of the Smithsonian Air and Space Museum [POSTPONED at last minute] 1930-2110 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: Prokofiev's epic score for Eisenstein's last great film, Ivan the Terrible, was adapted for the concert hall by its original conductor Abram Stasevich, and appears here alongside Rachmaninov's colourful and cinematic Rhapsody on a Theme of Paganini. Chris de Souza introduces this all-Russian concert recorded earlier this month at St. David's Hall, Cardiff. Rachmaninov: Rhapsody on a theme of Paganini for piano and orchestra (Op.43); Prokofiev: Ivan the Terrible oratorio arr. Stasevich from the film score 2000-2030 *BBCR4 The Last Mystery of Stalin: On the evening of March 1st 1953 Joseph Stalin was found lying unconscious on the floor of his dacha outside Moscow. Four days later he was dead. As doctors tended the dying dictator his political rivals vied for power, and the Soviet people became paralysed with fear at what the future might bring. As funeral plans were finalised, 5 million people filed past his body. Hundreds died in the crush to see the body interned with Lenin's in the Kremlin mausoleum, and many more were arrested for daring to voice their happiness at his death. Tim Whewell describes the days that changed the Soviet Union forever 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: From F.D.R. to Bill Clinton, audio recordings from inside the Oval Office offer an intimate look at the inner workings of history. Join guest host Lynn Neary for a look at what we've learned from presidential audio recordings -- and what's left to find out % 2100-2130 *BBCR4 Nature: Empathy and Ivory: As the pressure to resume the ivory trade increases, so does the poaching of elephants. Mark Carwardine considers the uncertain future of the African elephant 2130-2200 *BBCWa THE STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 2 of 2 UT TUE FEBRUARY 25 TUESDAYS St. Walburga Kiribati presidential elections; Kuwait National Day 0000-0100 *WMUB Interconnect with John Hingsbergen and Cheri Lawson: The Spirituality and Philosophy of the Anti-War Movement Guests: Dr. Phil Shriver, President Emeritus of Miami University; Dr Lonnie Valentine, Associate Professor of Peace and Justice Studies, Earlham College, Richmond, Indiana; also at least one representative of student peace groups 0100-0200 *KGOU Freedom: Songs From The Heart Of America: Narrated by public radio veteran, Alex Chadwick, "Freedom: Music From The Heart of America" is a one-hour documentary on the history of America, exploring the idea of freedom - how different types of Americans have defined it, how it has been fought for and how it has been expanded and redefined in ways that the Founding Fathers could not have foreseen or imagined. The program explores this by featuring the music that provided the soundtrack for our fight for freedom, from the American Revolution to the present day 0105-0130 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: In a series of four programmes entitled 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans', Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. Prog. 4: Mass Fashion 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Part One of Slow Food. While mass demonstrations against globalisation have grabbed the headlines, a more positive challenge toglobal food and agriculture has been growing. The Slow Food Movement began in Italy in 1986, when McDonald's first opened in Rome. Since then, it has spread around the world. Jill Eisen explores this tantalizing mix of politics, environmentalism and the pursuit of pleasure. CONCLUDES NEXT MONDAY [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-0300 *WHYY DESTINATION FREEDOM: Set in Chicago in the late 1940s, this dramatization exposes how restrictive covenants and outright violence kept millions of blacks trapped in housing conditions guaranteed to produce ill health and wide profit margins. Jack Warren, a black, hard-working family man and WWII veteran, is caught up in and manipulated by a system designed to profit at his expense. 0230: This program tells the story of Jane Edna Hunter, a nurse and founder of the National Phyllis Wheatly Association. In 1913, Hunter defied social and economic odds to build a housing sanctuary for women in Cleveland. Not only did it offer an impressive range of health, employment, and other social services, it did so without regard to a client's race, creed, or color 0306-0359 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: How the threat of war in Iraq, a strike in Venezuela, and a refueling mishap on Staten Island have helped push oil prices ever higher 0400-0500 *KQED World Affairs Council: "America's Role in the World of the 21st Century: Principled Engagement." Tonight's speaker is former U.S. Senator Gary Hart. In preparation for a possible 2004 presidential run, former Colorado Senator Hart will deliver a major foreign policy address outlining an alternative to the "Bush Doctrine." The speech will mark the second of four national policy addresses Hart will deliver this winter [rpt at 1000] 1330-1400 *BBCR4 REAL HISTORY OF OPERA: Otello: Huw Edwards finds that Verdi's setting of Shakespeare's great tragedy has its roots in the Italian unification and in the struggle for musical supremacy in a Wagner-dominated world 1406-1430 *BBCWa ON SCREEN: A new series, I LOVE TV, examines our endless fascination with the small screen. From the USA to Uttar Pradesh, Samoa to Timbuktu, Ed Butler finds TV addicts everywhere forming their opinion about the world through television. News and drama, as well as emerging genres like music television and reality TV have become central to our many worlds, but how real are those worlds? In the age of cable and satellite, how far is television defining our tastes, our ambitions and our lifestyles? Who really holds the power? 1 of 4 1530-1600 *BBCWa STORY OF IRAQ: How come Saddam? 2 of 2 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Lobbying for a Foreign Government; Guest: Otolie English. After the terrorist attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon, English's home temporarily became Afghanistan's Northern Alliance headquarters as she launched nationwide public relations offensive to make the Administration and American public aware of the role the alliance would play in liberating Afghanistan. She helped to publicize and implement Afghan President Hamid Karzai's first trip to the United States as a statesman and coordinated the newly established Afghan government's lobbying effort. Her efforts initiated the bipartisan Congressional Caucus on Afghanistan and helped to pass the Afghanistan Freedom Support Act % 1706-1759 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Tech Tuesday: all about computer printers % 1900-2230 *BBCR2 various music series; see DAY 1906-1930 *BBCWe ON SCREEN: I LOVE TV, 1 of 4; see Tue 1406 1930-2130 *BBCR3 PERFORMANCE ON 3: Direct from Symphony Hall, Birmingham, a concert by the City of Birmingham SO under Steven Sloane, with Carleton Etherington (organ), of Ives' Variations on America and Symphony No 1. Tonight's concert concludes with the swirling, moving and epic Symphony No 9 in E minor (From the New World) by Dvorak [BBC, please can the obligatory superlatives -- the great music speaks for itself!] 2005-2030 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: In a series of four programmes entitled 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans', Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. Prog. 4: Mass Fashion 2030-2100 *BBCWe Omnibus: The Shoals Of Capricorn: Charting the three-year expedition by scientists to link world weather to the unexplored Shoals of Capricorn in the Indian Ocean. John Hosken meets scientists and natives 2030-2130 *BBCR2 The Sound Of The Movies: Notes And Notions. We ask what talents and disciplines are needed to be a screen composer? Composers talk about the heritage of their craft, and film composers from the past whom they admire or who have influenced them. We also explore the beginning of the composition process. What sort of music is wanted? Will an existing classic be better than a new composition: Wagner for Apocalypse Now, a Strauss waltz for 2001: A Space Odyssey (eventually chosen over an original score by Alex North). Composers tell us about discussions with the director, writers and producers; the juggling act of being creative and tuning in to what other people hear? We discover how composers set about researching a film's subject or time- period. Just how do you research the music of Cleopatra's Egypt? How do they make their initial choices on style and approach, and how often do they find themselves revisiting their own previous themes (John Barry made a quirky reworking of his regal music for Queen Eleanor in The Lion in Winter as a theme for the Queen of Hearts in Alice in Wonderland!) How do they start sketching and proposing ideas? 2100-2200 *OPB Chautauqua Lecture: "Curiosity, Motivation and Achievement" with Leon Botstein (Baht'-steen), president of Bard College since 1975. He is also the Leon Levy Professor in the Arts and Humanities at Bard. Leon Botstein is music director of the American Symphony Orchestra, as well as co-artistic director of the Bard Music Festival and artistic director of the American Russian Youth Orchestra. Dr. Botstein is also editor of The Musical Quarterly. http://www.ciweb.com 2130-2200 *BBCR2 History Of Pop Arranging: The Look of Love on a Down Town Train with That Ol' Devil arranger John Altman and Art of Noise arranger Anne Dudley. British arrangers John Altman and Anne Dudley dominated the sound of the 1980's. Altman talks about Rod Stewart's Down Town Train and Alison Moyet's Old Devil Called Love, while Anne Dudley gets all electronic with The Art of Noise, ABC and Frankie Goes to Hollywood. Plus, for fans of Bob Dylan, don't miss Jerry Wexler's account of the making of Slow Train Coming 2300-2330 *BBCR4 The Mark Steel Lecture: Continuing his series of comedy lectures on people with a passion, Mark Steel enters the ring with Muhammad Ali UT WED FEBRUARY 26 WEDNESDAYS St. Nestor Bolivia Carnival (during a week from this day on) Kuwait Liberation Day 0100-XXXX *WMNR EVENING AT THE OPERA: Singers from Argentina, Chile, Peru, and Uruguay (guest: Jesús M. López 0105-0300 *CBCR1 CBC Literary Awards Gala: Join hosts Eleanor Wachtel and Stanley Pean for the CBC Literary Awards Gala live from the Museum of Civilisation in Hull, Quebec. This event will be broadcast simultaneously on FM French Network 'La Chaine Culturelle'. Enjoy excerpts from the six winning works, plus brief conversations between the hosts and the six first-place winners. The performances will be accompanied by piano and bass, and by an on-stage multi-media presentation which you can be viewed online via cbc.ca [2 hours, pre-empts IDEAS; if it is really `live` at 8 pm ET, what happens in the AT zone, and any repeats?] [actually, appeared to run at 0000-0200 at least on AT/ET feeds, and IDEAS - about St. Francis - DID appear at 0205, at least de Montreal] 0106-0130 *BBCWS ON SCREEN: I LOVE TV, 1 of 4; see Tue 1406 0230-0300 *BBCWS Omnibus: The Shoals Of Capricorn: Charting the three-year expedition by scientists to link world weather to the unexplored Shoals of Capricorn in the Indian Ocean. John Hosken meets scientists and natives 0605-0630 *BBCWa Meridian - Masterpiece: 'Blockbusters, Burgers and Blue Jeans': Nick Rankin looks at some of the processes and products of the Americanisation of global culture. 4 of 4: Mass Fashion 0630-0727 tvHBOE REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER 1406-1430 *BBCWa Meridian Writing begins another World Book Club series, featuring Doris Lessing and her classic first novel The Grass Is Singing. Lessing was born in Persia (now Iran), moved to Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), and later moved to England. March`s feature is Jung Chang`s international bestseller Wild Swans, and you can send in questions for Chang (presuming you`ve read the book) to meridian.writing@bbc.co.uk or via mail to the usual Bush House address. Repeated Thu 0106 1406-1430 *BBCWe ON SCREEN: I LOVE TV, 1 of 4; see Tue 1406 1506-1600 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Fleets of peace activists are arriving in Iraq, determined to thwart an American-lead war on that country. On The Connection after nine, Donald Rumsfeld calls them war criminals, while Saddam Hussein calls them welcome [repeat at 0306; several other times too; see PRF] 1530-1600 *BBCWe Omnibus: The Shoals Of Capricorn: Charting the three-year expedition by scientists to link world weather to the unexplored Shoals of Capricorn in the Indian Ocean. John Hosken meets scientists and natives 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): The cost of gas is going up nationwide, and San Francisco has the highest prices in the country. Forum discusses the factors responsible for the increases. Guests: Rae Dougher, senior policy analyst at the American Petroleum Institute; Tim Cohelan, partner and civil litigator at Cohelan and Khoury; and Jenny Mack, media representative for the American Automobile Association of Northern California 1800-1900 *CAINAN THE POINT: The Beatles --- More than thirty-nine years after the Fab Four took the country by storm, we're still fascinated with The Beatles. Professor Glen Gass from Indiana University joins The Point to discuss a course he teaches on The Beatles 1806-1900 *KQED FORUM with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Michael Krasny and his guests discuss Chinatown, the historical relevance of ghettos, and models of racial cooperation. Guests: George Ow; publisher of Capitola Books Company; Tony Hill, creator of workshops and seminars on diversity; and Sandy Lydon, professor emeritus of history at Cabrillo College and author of numerous books on the Chinese in the Monterey Bay Region 1845-1930 *BBCR3 lebrecht.live: Much of modern art arises from what Jean- Paul Sartre called 'writing against'. It is designed to arouse indignation over inhumanity, injustice and the impermeable heartlessness of authority. Picasso intended 'Guernica' as an anti-Franco propaganda piece. Shostakovich wrote symphonies that covertly attacked Stalinist tyranny. David Hare is writing a piece for the National Theatre castigating the Blair government. But is art an appropriate medium for agit-prop? Is political art the most effective art, or even good politics? Can art ever be neutral? In a post-totalitarian world, lebrecht.live attempts to draw new boundaries between art and politics for the 21st century. Your views, please, to lebrecht.live@bbc.co.uk or phone us from 6.00pm on 08700 100 444 [national rates] or text us on 07786 201333 1905-2000 *BBCWe World Briefing Special: A special edition of the programme, with live coverage of the debate on Iraq by the British Parliament in the House of Commons 2006-2030 *BBCWe MADE FOR LIFE: Our planet may be just the third rock from the sun, but it's the only place in the universe that we can be certain harbours life as we know it. And it seems increasingly clear from modern research that it was no accident that life has colonized this particular rock. Events way back in our geological past - even at the birth of our planet nearly half a billion years ago - seem to have conspired to make life happen here. Science Writer Gabrielle Walker joins experts at some of the oldest parts of the globe, to see for herself the evidence that earth truly was Made For Life: 1 of 4 2006-2030 *BBCWa ON SCREEN: I LOVE TV, 1 of 4; see Tue 1406 2100-2130 *BBCR4 An Earth Made For Life: How different was the Earth when life was getting its first toe-hold on the planet. Science writer Gabrielle Walker sees the oldest remnants of the Earth`s surface and learns what it tells us 2130-2200 *BBCWa OMNIBUS: The Shoals Of Capricorn: Charting the three-year expedition by scientists to link world weather to the unexplored Shoals of Capricorn in the Indian Ocean. John Hosken meets scientists and natives 2330-2400 *CBCR1 DISPATCHES: Starving for Power...Carolyn Dempster's report from Zimbabwe reveals how the food disaster there is making Robert Mugabe's iron rule even stronger, and the besieged opposition weaker. With host Rick MacInnes-Rae [+1/2/3/4 hrs] UT THU FEBRUARY 27 THURSDAYS St. Leander Dominican Republic Independence Day Germany Carnival 0100-0300 *CBCR2 The Great Canadian Music Dream: Classical and country. Rock and urban. Pop and opera. Some of the country's most exciting new musical talent vie for stardom as General Motors of Canada presents The Great Canadian Music Dream, a series of six specials on CBC Television and CBC Radio Two. Tonight's the night you crown Canada's newest star. Log on at http://www.cbc.ca/musicdream before the show to see the five finalists' performances and vote on-line for your favourite before 6:30 pm ET. Or call 1-900-273-3333 (1-877-443-4414 for NWT, Yukon, and Nunavut). Then join host Jian Ghomeshi for the live Finale and see whose dream you've made come true. The Great Canadians Music Dream 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Studs Terkel. In best-selling books that began in 1970 with "Hard Times," and a legendary radio show that started on WFMT in Chicago, Studs Terkel told the tales that real people had told him. He speaks with Ideas host Paul Kennedy [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0130 *BBCWS Meridian Writing begins another World Book Club series, featuring Doris Lessing and her classic first novel The Grass Is Singing. Lessing was born in Persia (now Iran), moved to Southern Rhodesia (now Zimbabwe), and later moved to England. March`s feature is Jung Chang`s international bestseller Wild Swans, and you can send in questions for Chang (presuming you`ve read the book) to meridian.writing@bbc.co.uk or via mail to the usual Bush House address. Repeat of Wed 1406 0200-0210 *CBCR1 World Watch: With a potential war in Iraq and possible terrorist attacks around the world, Canadians expect CBC Radio to deliver the news when it happens. World Watch will provide that window on the world, and a substantial venue for stories developing through the evening in Canada. World Watch, weeknights at 10 p.m. (10:30 NT) on CBC Radio One [+1/2/3/4 hrs] 0200-0300 tvCBS 60 MINUTES II: Dan Rather interviews Saddam Hussein [+1/3 hours in western timezones] 0206-0230 *BBCWS MADE FOR LIFE, 1 of 4: see Wed 2006 0306-0400 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Fleets of peace activists are arriving in Iraq, determined to thwart an American-lead war on that country. On The Connection after nine, Donald Rumsfeld calls them war criminals, while Saddam Hussein calls them welcome 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE FUTURE OF THE AMERICAN MILITARY War in Iraq looms as the next great challenge for the American military but what lies beyond? A series of small wars and peacekeeping operations have kept our armed forces busy since the end of the Cold War but have they fundamentally restructured enough to meet our defense needs in the changing world? The future of the American military, even as it lies in wait outside Iraq, is our focus tonight. DANA PRIEST is one of Washington's leading Pentagon reporters, the author of a new book The Mission: America's Military in the Twenty-First Century, and our guest this evening. Joining in the discussion will be General DAVID GRANGE, the former commander of the 1st Infantry Division and current second-in-command of the Tribune McCormick Foundation, and an active observer of military affairs 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: "Destination Freedom/ Black Radio Days." An exceptional broadcast series created by African American writers in the 1940s and '50s to portray blacks and black life realistically and positively. Hosted by acclaimed musician, actor and composer Oscar Brown Jr. This week, "Housing," a dramatization that exposes how restrictive covenants and outright violence help millions of blacks trapped in housing conditions guaranteed to produce ill health and wide profit margins; and "Diary of a Nurse," a program that tells the story of Jane Edna Hunter, nurse and founder of the National Phyllis Wheatly Association, a housing sanctuary for women in Cleveland 0430-0527 tvHBOE REAL TIME WITH BILL MAHER 0606-0630 *BBCWa ON SCREEN: I LOVE TV, 1 of 4; see Tue 1406 1506-1530 *BBCWe MADE FOR LIFE, 1 of 4: see Wed 2006 1530-1600 *BBCWa Omnibus: The Shoals Of Capricorn: Charting the three-year expedition by scientists to link world weather to the unexplored Shoals of Capricorn in the Indian Ocean. John Hosken meets scientists and natives 1630-1700 *BBCR4 The Material World: Quentin Cooper talks to Michael Newton, author of savage Girls and Wild Boys, about discoveries of children who have been looked after by animals and deprived of human contact 1806-1900 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Looks at the history of utopian thought in architecture and contemporary architectural projects. What does utopia mean now? Guests: Edward Rothstein, Cultural Critic at Large for the New York Times and co-author of "Visions of Utopia"; Jean Gardner, professor in the department of Architecture, Interiors & Lighting at Parsons School of Design, The New University, and co- chair of the Association of Collegiate Schools of Architecture Task Force for Sustainable Design; David Hansen, director of the Occidental Arts and Ecology Center, a Bay Area utopian community and co-directors of the OAEC Ecological Agriculture and Democracy Program and Intentional Communities Program; and David Erdman, architect and designer in SERVO, an international collaboration of four architects whose work uses emerging and innovative technologies and materials 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: When was the last time you read the Constitution? You won't get an F if it has been awhile, but you might wish to locate a copy while listening to the show % 2030-2100 *BBCR4 In Business: Sail Of The Century: The Queen Mary 2 is the largest liner ever built. Peter Day goes behind the scenes and looks forward to her maiden Atlantic voyage in 2004 2106-2130 *BBCWa MADE FOR LIFE, 1 of 4: see Wed 2006 2106-2200 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: While most critics of the media say reporters are too liberal, journalist Eric Alterman contends the opposite is true, and that the bulk of reporting is quite conservative. His new book is "What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News." Also, we'll hear from Former CBS reporter and producer Bernard Goldberg, who says that nearly all the media put a liberal spin on the news 2130-2400 *BBCR3 The Crusades: The Unfinished Story: Allan Little presents a special evening of discussion, features and music exploring the significance of the Crusades. 2135 The Struggle For Jerusalem: Allan Little visits Israel to re-evaluate the events of the Third Crusade from Islamic and Christian perspectives. 2215 Usamah Speaks: Readings from an 11th-century account by Usamah Ibn-Munqidh of early encounters between Islam and Christianity. 2255 Crusading Present: Writer Adina Hoffman invites Jews, Christians and Muslims to her home in Jerusalem to share their thoughts on the power of the word Crusades today. 2320 A Perfect Match: Andrew Wheatcroft desconstructs the myths surrounding Saladin and Richard I and gives his view of why they have become such icons 2230-2300 *BBCWS In Praise Of God Special: Trevor Barnes presents highlights of the enthronement of Dr Rowan Williams as the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury 2255-2400 *BBCR3 See above UT FRI FEBRUARY 28 FRIDAYS St. Oswald Spain Andalusia Day 0000-XXXX *WBAAa WBAA TOWN FORUM ON POSSIBLE WAR WITH IRAQ [live] 0100-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: From the Winspear Centre in Edmonton, double bass soloist Jan Urke joins the Edmonton Symphony Orchestra in the world première of works by Gaetano Giuffre and Allan Gordon Bell, plus Elgar's Enigma Variations 0106-0200 *WPRi On Point: While Native Americans have suffered decades of poverty and marginalization, Indian gambling has now allowed for a previously unimaginable economic rebirth on tribal lands. At seven, On Point presents a special documentary titled: "Casino Reservations: Inside Out." Anthony Brooks will report on the immense wealth generated from the gambling tables, and asks who benefits? 0200-0400 *WMNR GOOD FOLK: Tribute to Johnny Cash: 16 Greatest Hits; The Alternative Johnny Cash ? Kindred Spirits; El Mc Meen: Breakout 0206-0300 *MichR The Connection: Bush's "battle for the future of the Muslim world." 0300-0400 *WQXR VOCAL SCENE: "A Bjoerling-Wunderlich Parallel" As George Jellinek says, "Few will dispute my assertion that Jussi Bjoerling and Fritz Wunderlich are among the great immortals of singing. You can hear the two of them, side by side, in identical repertoire" in this Vocal Scene edition 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Bush's "battle for the future of the Muslim world." 0306-0400 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: While most critics of the media say reporters are too liberal, journalist Eric Alterman contends the opposite is true, and that the bulk of reporting is quite conservative. His new book is "What Liberal Media? The Truth About Bias and the News." Also, we'll hear from Former CBS reporter and producer Bernard Goldberg, who says that nearly all the media put a liberal spin on the news 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE CONCEPT OF DIVERSITY "Diversity" has been a watchword in American life for decades. But what does it really mean? PETER WOOD, Professor of Anthropology at Boston University, has attempted to dissect the origins of an idea in Diversity: The Invention of a Concept. In it, he argues that, far from promoting diverse ideas and individuals, the concept of diversity has reinforced group stereotypes and hindered the advancement of our whole society. In the midst of ever-intensifying debate over race and diversity, Wood's is an argument that needs to be addressed—and it will be 0400-0500 *KQED Alternative Radio: "Citizen Student." The word "citizenship" has almost a quaint ring to it. But these days, with talk of terrorism at home, and war abroad, many educators are asking what's the most effective way to teach young Americans about America? Alex Chadwick takes listeners on a tour of public schools across the country to find out how young people are learning about - and debating - American ideas and ideals [repeat at 1000] 0400-0500 *WHYY BEEN THERE DONE THAT with Marty Goldensohn: Marty explores love from the art of kissing to why so many 30-something women think there's no one worth kissing. Barbara Defoe Whitehead explains why there are no good men left, a conversation with African-American romance novelist Leslie Esdaile, and the celebration of sweets --chocolate, Turkish Delight, and jaw breakers. Also, John Timpaine swoons over great love letters; songs from the best girl groups of all time; and why you really should be nice to your waitress. Visit our website at http://www.whyy.org/btdt for information, links and all our archived programs 0400-0500 *WMNR NEW MUSIC GALLERY: John Serrie: And the Stars Go with You; Kitaro: daylight, moonlight 0606-0700 *KQED FORUM: History of Utopian Thought [see Thu 1806] 1400-1500 *WMUB Friday on WMUB Forum with guest host Cleve Callison What is American culture? Another Miami Book Club of the Air, broadcast live from King Library on the Miami campus in Oxford. Guests: Dr. Peter Williams, Distinguished Professor of Comparative Religion and American Studies and Dr. Mary Kupiec Cayton, Professor of History at Miami, co-editors of the mammoth Encyclopedia of American Culture. Email questions ahead of time to WMUB Forum [repeat at 0000] 1405-1430 *BBCWa Arts In Action: Ofeibea Quist-Arcton presents a special edition of the arts programme from the 18th biennial Panafrican Film and TV Festival, in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso. 1430-1500 *BBCWa Jazzmatazz: Quincy Jones In this four-part series presenter Alyn Shipton looks at the remarkable life of Quincy Jones - one of the most influential figures in popular music 1506-1600 *WPRi Jean Feraca: Journalist John Nichols says there are now two superpowers at odds in the world: the United States vs. International Public Opinion. He joins Jean Feraca after nine to analyze the peace movement as it's being reported around the world. Guest: John Nichols, Associate Editor of The Capital Times; co-author, "Our Media, Not Theirs" jnichols@captimes.com [repeat at 0306] 1530-1600 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: "L'Osstidcho" was French Canada's own Woodstock. But there was no known recording of it...until now [new time; rather, reactivated; +1/2/3/4 hours] 1600-1700 *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House: Whitman and Our World: Considered by many to be the greatest of all American poets, Walt Whitman celebrated an evolving democratic sensibility that would eventually unite humanity. University of Iowa Whitman scholar Ed Folsom will discuss the surprising ways in which Whitman's poetry and prose continue to be meaningful more than 110 years after his death. Folsom is the editor of a new collection of essays titled Whitman East and West. Live music by Bob & Kristie Black 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: Misterogers tribute 1806-1900 *KQED Forum with Friday Forum host Angie Coiro (Hour Two) Angie Coiro talks with Rebecca Solnit, author of "River of Shadows: Eadward Muybridge and the Technological Wild West." She is also the author of "Wanderlust: A History of Walking." 2030-2100 *BBCWe The Giving Game: The history and impact of the thousands of international non-governmental organisations worldwide 2106-2200 *KQED FRESH AIR: Tribute to Misterogers 2130-2215 *BBCR3 Night Waves: In 1235, when Henry III was given three leopards by his new brother-in-law Frederic, the Holy Roman Emperor, he sent it in desperation to the Tower of London. Soon the leopards were joined by a Norwegian polar bear. And so on it went for the next 600 years as more and more animal gifts arrived from returning explorers and VIP guests. Paul Allen talks to Daniel Hahn about the extraordinary story of Britain's first zoo: the Tower Menagerie 2306-2400 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: a critique of press coverage regarding U.S./Iraq relations from an anti-war perspective. Next week's guest offers a similar critique from a pro-war point of view. Guest: Norman Solomon, syndicated columnist & co-author of "Target Iraq: What the News Media Didn't Tell You" UT SAT MARCH 1 SATURDAYS St. Albinus Marshall Islands Nuclear Bomb Victims' Day Hinduism Maha Srivaratri or Shrivaratri Iran Tassou'a Korea South Movement towards Independence Day (Samiljol) Bosnia & Herzegovina Independence Day Bosnia (Rep. Srpska) Independence Day Estonia parliamentary elections Moldova (Republic of) Martsishor (Bahá'i) Spain (Balearic Isles) Balearic Isles Day Switzerland Republic's Day Brazil Foundation Day, São Sebastião do Rio de Janeiro Paraguay Battle of Cerro Cora 0000-0100 *WMUB Friday on WMUB Forum with guest host Cleve Callison What is American culture? Another Miami Book Club of the Air, broadcast live from King Library on the Miami campus in Oxford. Guests: Dr. Peter Williams, Distinguished Professor of Comparative Religion and American Studies and Dr. Mary Kupiec Cayton, Professor of History at Miami, co-editors of the mammoth Encyclopedia of American Culture. Email questions ahead of time to WMUB Forum 0000-0030 *RFPI WINGS [Women's International News Gathering Service]: Islamization in Nigeria: Ayesha Imam (2002 winner of Canada's John Humphrey Freedom Award0 heads Baobab for Women's Human Rights, a national coalition of Nigerian women's organizations: Asma'u Joda is with the Center for Women and Adolescent Empowerment, a member group of Baobab. The two talk with Frieda Werden of WINGS about the trend toward political Islamization in northern Nigeria, beginning with Zamfara state. They explain what political and economic developments stimulated Islamization, what happened to those who critized it, and how women work, carefully and respectfully, to educate the public about what Sharia (Islamic law) means in various countries around the world- that it doesn't have to be interpreted in a way that is highly restrictive toward women. E-mail contact: wings@wings.org [+7445 15039 +6/12 hours] 0100-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: Tune in for a very special choral celebration of the 75th anniversary of the Orpheum Theatre in Vancouver. Enjoy performances from the Vancouver Bach Choir, Vancouver Chamber Choir, Vancouver Cantata Singers and the CBC Radio Orchestra. The program includes works by Mozart, Bach, Handel and Chatman 0100-0400 *WFMU FLOW Ensemble on World of Echo with Dave Mandl: live remote broadcast from Berlin. "FLOW280203" will be a performance incorporating music, manipulated sounds, and the Flow Ensemble's unique interpretation of headlines from the daily newspapers 0105-0130 *BBCWa Arts In Action: Ofeibea Quist-Arcton presents a special edition of the arts programme from the 18th biennial Panafrican Film and TV Festival, in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Exile is a fact of life for many people in the contemporary world. South African playwright Breyten Breytenbach and others reflect on how exile shapes theatre, at a conference on Theatre and Exile at the University of Toronto. Tune in to the conclusion of Theatre 0130-0200 *BBCWa Jazzmatazz: Quincy Jones: In this four-part series presenter Alyn Shipton looks at the remarkable life of Quincy Jones - one of the most influential figures in popular music 0230-0300 *BBCWS The Giving Game is a four-part 30-minute documentary series looking at the growth of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) since World War II. There are now 40,000 international NGOs and millions of local initiatives. Their roots, and the reasons for their growth, are explored. Repeated Tuesdays, 1530 0306-0400 *WPRi Jean Feraca: Journalist John Nichols says there are now two superpowers at odds in the world: the United States vs. International Public Opinion. He joins Jean Feraca after nine to analyze the peace movement as it's being reported around the world. Guest: John Nichols, Associate Editor of The Capital Times; co-author, "Our Media, Not Theirs" jnichols@captimes.com 0306-0400 *KQED FRESH AIR: Tribute to Misterogers 0400-0500 *KQED Commonwealth Club: In a free public forum, a distinguished panel of experts offer their take on the crisis over nuclear weapons currently escalating in North Korea. As the U.S. government continues to focus on possible military action in Iraq, it argues that problems in North Korea can be solved diplomatically. The speakers explore the real nuclear threat posed by North Korea, how the situation might be diffused, and the possible ramifications of a war with Iraq. The guests tonight: David Hong, President, Korean American Coalition, SF Chapter; The Honorable Jong Hoon Kim, Counsul General of South Korea in SF; Dr. Daniel Pinkston, Korea Specialist with the Monterey Institute of International Suicides; Dr. Robert Scalapino, Professor Emeritus, Institute of East Asian Studies, UC Berkeley; and Moderator Dr. Gloria Duffy, CEO of The Commonwealth Club and Former Nuclear Arms Negotiator [repeat at 1000] 0500-0600 *KUNM AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Journeys with the Oud 1300-1400 *BBCR3 WORLD ROUTES: Lucy Duran and Viram Jasani conclude their musical tour of North India. This week they continue their exploration of desert music in Rajasthan where they visit the small village of Hamira and meet musicians regularly paid in camels and goats for their performances. Ending their journey in Bombay they visit the family home of Indian fusion artist Trilok Gurtu who introduces his mother, Shoba Gurtu, a well-known and highly respected classical singer. Plus, they meet female tabla player Anuradha Pal, and playback singer Alka Yagnik: a Bollywood superstar and a nominee in this year's Radio 3 Awards for World Music 1305-1400 *CBCR1 The House: Bordering a Brooding Giant. Host Anthony Germain interviews Prime Minister Chretien and President Fox. This week Prime Minister Chretien is making an official visit to Mexico to hold talks with President Vicente Fox. The House will examine how the other nation bordering on America is dealing with its trade and security relations in the wake of September 11th. Are there lessons for Canada in the Mexican experience? Should the two countries be considering greater co- operation in their dealings with the US? [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1330-1400 *BBCWa The Music Feature: Don't Touch That Dial: A new series, visiting six more countries: Russia, Lebanon, Singapore, South Africa, Spain and New Zealand, highlighting local music and DJs 1506-1530 *BBCWa MADE FOR LIFE: see Wed 2006 1600-XXXX *WABE The Home Front 2003: A Marketplace Special Report: anchored by David Brancaccio, focuses on the questions and challenges Americans face in a wartime economy. The program will include practical advice for listeners thinking about how to prepare their own lives for the domestic effects of war. With special segments on oil, consumerism, the threat of retaliation, media coverage, and government spending, the report will examine assumptions about the economies of war and America's sense of economic security 1700-2000 *WFMU Barbara Dane on The Radio Thrift Shop with Laura Cantrell: The Proprietress hosts legendary protest/blues singer Barbara Dane for a sampling of music from the upcoming Vietnam Songbook performance at Joe's Pub Saturday evening 1800-1830 *BBCR3 JAZZ FILE: Alyn Shipton begins a four-part series on the history of stride piano with the music of Eubie Blake, James P Johnson, William the Lion Smith, Butch Thompson and Fats Waller 1815-1900 *BBCR4 Loose Ends: Ned Sherrin and guests with the usual eclectic mix of conversation, comedy and music [censored last week for French joke] 1900-1945 *BBCR4 Saturday Review: Michael Richards created one of television's zaniest comic characters, Cosmo Kramer, the eccentric, wire-haired neighbour in the acclaimed American sitcom Seinfeld. Throwing open the door and skidding in to his friend's apartment, his manic entrances were regarded by many as the highpoints of the show. But how well suited is he in the role of the psychotic mass murderer, Jonathan Brewster, in a new West End production of the classic black farce Arsenic And Old Lace? Tom Sutcliffe and guests give their verdict on that as well as the new Spike Jonze film, Adaptation 1910-1930 *BBCR3 20 MINUTES: New York Artists In Their Studios: Tim Marlow talks to Larry Poons, lyrical abstract impressionist of the 1960s New York school [Met Opera interval; time approx.; Opera News on US+ nets?] 2000-2100 *BBCR4 ARCHIVE HOUR: Stalin The Terrible: Like his predecessor Tsar Ivan, Stalin held on to power with a reign of terror, his purges and his policies destroying thousands of his citizens. Like other tyrants though, he managed to project an image of the 'great teacher', and when he died 50 years ago on March 5 1953, the nation went into genuine shock and mourning. Searching in the BBC and the former Communist archives Jim Riordan uncovers the witnesses who experienced Stalin's rule at first hand, and examines how Stalin kept his powerful hold on the USSR over a period of 25 years 2030-2050 *BBCR3 MET OPERA QUIZ [time approx.; also US+ nets] 2100-2200 *BBCR2 Startime! James Brown Live at the Apollo: Mark Lamarr presents the second of two programmes following the career of the most important artist to come out of black America, featuring interviews with Brown himself, and his alumni 2100-2200 *KQED Radio Specials: "Her Stories." A Women's History Month Special with guest host Dmae Roberts. This hour will include The Kitchen Sisters at that one-time staple of American housewifery: the Tupperware party; poems by Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Barrson, and Meryn Cadell; as well as sound diaries and audio collages. Repeats Wednesday 3/5 8pm [Thu 0400] 2200-2300 *KQED Soundprint: Segment One: "Common Ground." Scotland: the land that brought us the steam engine, the thermos flask, the pneumatic tyre, and the vacuum cleaner - to say nothing of single malt whisky. But few people know that Scotland is also in the vanguard of a bold experiment in social justice and economic equality. As producer Bob Carty found out, the Scots are not only enmeshed in explosive debates about power, and wealth and privilege, but also about how to revive the economy and culture of rural Scotland. Segment Two: "Fishing in Troubled Waters." Scottish fishermen are facing an uncertain future as their market opens up to international fishing companies. Combined with falling world prices and rising fuel costs, these global factors threaten the viability of the industry. The British Broadcasting Corporation's Susie Emmett reports on how the small fishing port of Eyemouth adapts to the changes 2205-2230 *BBCWe Composer Of The Month: Antonin Dvorak: Nick Morgan introduces the first of four programmes on the life and work of the Czech composer Antonin Dvorak 2300-XXXX *WOSUf ST PAUL CHAMBER ORCHESTERA: Beethoven Symphony cycle begins [NOT, contrary to WOSU listing] 2300-2330 *CBCR1 The World this Weekend: The tiny Mediterranean island of Malta is set to hold a referendum on joining the European Union. Pro EU forces promise greater prosperity and security in the bosom of Europe. But Malta may be one of the most Catholic countries in the world. And as John Laurenson reports, some Maltese worry that joining the EU will be the end of Malta's deeply Catholic laws. [+1/2/3 hours] UT SUN MARCH 2 SUNDAYS Ethiopia Battle of Adowa Myanmar Paesants' Day Syrian Arab Republic parliamentary elections Estonia parliamentary elections Texas Independence Day Argentina general elections 0000-XXXX *KUNM KUNM RADIO BOARD ELECTION CANDIDATES ON-AIR FORUM 0100-0300 *WPRi Higher Ground with Jonathan Overby: The cast of Higher Ground with a live broadcast from Vilas Hall featuring Bruce Bradley performing Welsh Songs, Alice In Dairyland, MATC Performing Arts along with Native American poet Donald Two Rivers 0100-0300 *WCNY Choral Traditions with Bonnie Beth Derby: A SAINT DAVID'S DAY FESTIVAL. We honor the patron saint of Wales with the Cantata "Saint David" by Arwel Hughes as conducted by Owain Arwel Hughes. Also included will be a number of Welsh songs sung by several Welsh Male Choirs. The World Choir of over 10,000 men's voices place the finishing touch on this St. David's Day program with their performance of "Myfanwy" 0130-0230 *RFPI ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Molly Ivins about Politics and the Art of Deception: Bush and Company just gave the American public the best argument yet for publicly financing campaigns. Getting cozy with the rich is nothing new to president-select George W. Bush. But even he has reached new heights in his recently unveiled tax plan, which abolishes dividend taxes on investments. This direct appeal to what he calls the "investor class" also happens to appeal to the portion of the population that is most likely to vote. But here is the hidden catch: not only is he giving up on the working class, but also the majority of the so-called "investor class". It turns out the plan does not apply to retirement accounts such as 401(k)s and IRAs. Over half of the benefits go to the wealthiest 1 percent of Americans. It seems that the super-rich are the demographic Bush is really swooning over. Considering the social costs of influence peddling in Washington, public financing of political campaigns is a bargain. Molly Ivins is a keen and trenchant observer of the American political scene. Her razor-sharp wit and pen spare no one. Based in Austin, Texas, she is a nationally syndicated columnist. Her book Molly Ivins Can't Say That, Can She? was a bestseller. She is the author of Nothing But Good Times Ahead. E-mail contact: ar@orci.com [+7445 15039 +6/12 hours] 0205-0230 *BBCWa Composer Of The Month: Antonin Dvorak: Nick Morgan introduces the first of four programmes on the life and work of the Czech composer Antonin Dvorak 1305-1330 *BBCWa Composer Of The Month: Antonin Dvorak: Nick Morgan introduces the first of four programmes on the life and work of the Czech composer Antonin Dvorak 1230-1300 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Sheila Dillon considers proposals to extend fair trade practices to British food producers and examines how farmers in developing countries are choosing quality rather than charity as the route to sustainable production 1330-1400 *BBCR4 Tiger Tales: Chris Gunness presents the series on modern Asian history. This edition looks at Indonesia and the mass resettlement programmes which have uprooted millions from their homes 1330-1400 *BBCWa In Praise Of God: Trevor Barnes presents highlights of the enthronement of Dr Rowan Williams as the 104th Archbishop of Canterbury in a service held last Thursday in Canterbury Cathedral 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Private Passions: Michael Berkeley's guest today is one of the great cultural icons of our time. Sir Peter Ustinov, actor, writer, theatre director, playwright, incomparable raconteur and charitable benefactor, has recently taken part in a major Prokofiev anniversary symposium and festival hosted by the Royal Northern College of Music. Prokofiev's Second Violin Concerto is among his personal musical passions, together with works by Bononcini, Mozart, Berlioz, Janacek and Britten, all discussed with characteristic erudition and wit 1505-1600 *CBCR1 SUNDAY EDITION: This week is the fiftieth anniversary of the death of Josef Stalin. In the third hour, a conversation with history professor and Stalin-scholar Robert Johnson about the bloody legacy of the Soviet strongman 1601-1700 *BBCWS International Recital: In the fourth programme of this year's series of concerts you can hear 'Les Freres Guisse' bringing New Sengalese Folk to St. George's Church, Bristol. They will be joined by three Bristol-based Western musicians to create the sound of 'Suuf' 1700-1745 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 2: The composer called it "a tiny little piece with a wisp of a scherzo" but it is, in fact, one of the grandest and most complex concertos ever written. Chris de Souza explores how Brahms combined the symphony and the concerto in this multifaceted work 1700-1900 *KGOU Changing World - At the Edge of Asia: BBC World Service and PRI's The World present The Changing World, an extraordinary series hosted by Lisa Mullins that examines major international security issues, global trends, and world events. At the Edge of Asia is a look at the culture, identity and lifestyle in Korea and Japan today. Major topics include: Dealing with the Neighbors, A Divided Nation, Blessed By The Gods, The Ruins Of The Future 1900-2000 *WILL MEDIA MATTERS: Eric Alterman is currently the media columnist for The Nation and writes a blog for MSNBC.com called Altercation. He lives with his family in Manhattan. Eric has recently published a new book, What Liberal Media?, which is hot off the presses at a bookstore near you. He'll be talking with us about his book, and his thesis that the media, far from having a liberal bias, is decidedly conservative 2000-2130 *BBCR3 Choirworks: The Choral Music Of Brahms: 1. Folksongs And Canons: Paul Guinery is joined by Malcolm Macdonald, author of a recent musical biography of Brahms, for the first in a four-part survey of the composer's choral music. In his twenties, Brahms conducted choirs in Detmold and in Hamburg. He used this experience to refine his craft, becoming especially expert in writing canons. Sanctus (Missa Canonica), RIAS Chamber Choir conducted by Marcus Creed et al. 2000-2200 *WMNR THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC Leonard Slatkin, conductor. Respighi: Ancient Airs & Dances; Haydn: Symphony #94 in G Major "Surprise"; Tchaikovsky: Symphony #3 in D Major, op. 29 "Polish" 2100-2200 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: This week's speakers are Arthur Sulzberger, chairman of the New York Times Company and publisher of the New York Times; and Howell Raines, new executive editor of the New York Times 2105-2300 *CBCR1 Cross Country Checkup: Host Rex Murphy explores anti- Americanism. The looming showdown with Iraq has kindled some strong anti-American sentiment here. This week an Liberal MP blurted out that she hated Americans. Does anti- Americanism run deep in Canada? [live in all zones] 2200-2300 *KQED On the Media: Why anti-war ads featuring actors could be hurting their cause. Also, a story on the on-line phenomenon that is The Smoking Gun. And, how the best special effects are blown away by a guy in an old rubber suit: the enduring legacy of Godzilla 2300-2400 *WBEZ Speaking of Faith: A Pew Forum on Politics and Religion in America (Minnesota Public Radio): How do political leaders reconcile deep personal religious conviction while serving a pluralistic constituency? Speaking of Faith presents compelling discussions with former New York Governor Mario Cuomo and Indiana Congressman Mark Souder, two deeply religious politicians. Their remarks were taped at the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life held in Washington, DC in October 2002. 2330-2400 *BBCR4 Something Understood: This Too Will Pass: Mark Tully considers the old tale of a king who sought a phrase which would be true and appropriate in all circumstances UT MON MARCH 3 MONDAYS St. Kunigunde Guam's Discovery Day Bulgaria Liberation Day Cape Verde Carnival (in Andalusia, Cadix only) Libyan Arab Jamahiriya People's Power Declaration Malawi Martyrs' Day Senegal Dakar Carnival 0000-0100 *WBEZ ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Noam Chomsky — U.S. Grand Strategy: Global Rule by Force: This program features Prof. Chomsky's presentation at the World Social Forum in Porto Alegre, Brazil 0000-0100 *CAINAN Citizen Students with Alex Chadwick 0015-0045 *BBCR4 Opening Nights: Oh What A Lovely War: Russell Davies on the stories behind the opening nights of musicals. Joan Littlewood, Victor Spinetti and Murray Melvin recall their ironic assault. Then Bells On Sunday 0100-0200 *WCNY Orgelwerke with Bonnie Beth Derby: THE ORGANS OF MALAGA CATHEDRAL. Tonight we travel to Malaga, Spain, for a visit to the Cathedral to hear the two historic organs. These instruments are among the most beautiful of the 18th century, both in sound and in their gilded sculptured cases. Organists Maria Grazia Filippi and Monika Henking will include the Concerto No. 6 for two organs of Antonio Soler and the Sonata for Two Organs of Josef Barrera as well as music of Cabanilles and two Anonymous 17th century composers 0100-0200 *CAINAN Beyond War 0200-0230 *CAINAN A Sense of Place: Love and War- Family Life in the Military 0200-0300 *WNYCf MAD ABOUT MUSIC monthly is due, no details posted % 0230-0300 *CAINAN Animal Stories 0300-0400 *CAINAN Alternative Radio: Tariq Ali, author of The Clash of Fundamentalisms 0300-0400 *KQED To the Best of Our Knowledge with Jim Fleming (Hour One): "Europe and America." Americans are from Mars, and Europeans are from Venus. At least, that's the view of foreign policy analyst Robert Kagan. He says Europeans no longer believe in military power, quite unlike America's leaders. In this hour, the growing split between Europe and America. And the peace treaty that carved up Iraq some eighty years ago 0500-0600 *WYSO Citizen Student: An NPR News Special: These days, with talk of terrorism at home, and war abroad, many educators are asking about the most effective ways of teaching young Americans about America. President Bush has said that children must know "the great cause of America," and "why their country is worth fighting for." But teachers have always debated how to teach the American "cause" and "character." That challenge becomes even more difficult in a time of terrorist threats and possible war. Host Alex Chadwick takes us on a tour of public schools across the country to find out how young people are learning about – and debating – American ideas and ideals. 0600-0700 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Andro Linklater, the author of "Measuring America." From the first colonies to the great march across the plains, they'll discuss the challenging technical proposition of surveying America. Moira will also speak with Dr. Joao Maguijo. A professor of theoretical physics at Imperial College in London, he has created a new Scientific Speculation: that the speed of light is not constant. We'll find out what this does to the Laws of Physics 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM: Costs of War: The Pentagon says a war on Iraq would cost at least $60 billion dollars, but other estimates for the total cost of war and occupation afterward start at $95 billion. A panel talks about the developing estimates, the military plans they're based on, and why the numbers are sparking renewed debate between the White House and Congressional Democrats % 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: Two hundred years ago, Chief Justice John Marshall handed down a decision that ultimately made the Supreme Court an autonomous institution. Today, some are arguing whether the court wields too much or too little power [repeat at 0206, 0306] 1530-1600 *BBCWe The Giving Game: Part 1: There are now over 42,000 international non-governmental organisations and millions of local ones. This series looks at their history, impact and why they have multiplied so quickly 1606-1700 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Discovering Dante, the poet of hell. Why readers still are joining the Dante Club 1700-1800 *WCPN Around Noon "Ohio Bicentennial": Host Dee Perry celebrates Ohio's Bicentennial with a program that recalls the history and explores the beauty of the Buckeye State. Dee welcomes local photographer Ian Adams, who has published a new book of photos celebrating the state's birthday, Ohio: A Bicentennial Portrait. Next, Dee chats with John Grabowski, Western Reserve Historical Society historian, who discusses key events from the past 200 years of Ohio history. Grabowski places Cleveland's role in Bicentennial context as he talks about his latest book, Cleveland: Then and Now. 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Women Waging Peace: Guests: Ambassador Swanee Hunt, Harvard's Kennedy School of Government; Sanam Anderlini, Women Waging Peace Policy Commission; Elizabeth Powley, Women Waging Peace Policy Commission. March is Women's History Month in the United States. Women Waging Peace brings together women from diverse areas of conflict around the world to share peace-building strategies and sharpen skills and shape public policy. Amb.Hunt will discuss how they accomplish these goals % 1706-1800 *KQED FORUM: with Michael Krasny (Hour One): The indictment of San Francisco's top police officers on charges of obstruction of justice. Guests: Mark Schlossberg, police practices policy director at the Northern California ACLU; Chris Cunnie, president of the San Francisco Police Officers Association; and Tony Ribera, former San Francisco Police Chief and now director of the International Institute of Criminal Justice Leadership at USF 1806-1900 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Asessing the recent studies on environmental chemicals found in the human body. Guests: James Pirkle, Deputy Director of Sciences at the National Center for Environmental Health at the Centers for Disease Control and Prevention and director of "The Second National Report on Human Exposure to Environmental Chemicals"; Michael Lerner, president and founder of health and environmental research institute Commonweal; Andrea Martin, founder of the Breast Cancer Fund; Lynn Goldman, professor of environmental health at Johns Hopkins Bloomberg School of Health; and Jane Houlihan, vice president for research at the Environmental Working Group and the primary author of the "Body Burden" study 1806-1900 *MichR Todd Mundt: J. Michael Fay walked across Africa. Fay was the subject of National Geographic's "Africa Extreme" TV special [repeat at 0106] 2005-2030 *BBCWa Arts In Action: Ofeibea Quist-Arcton presents a special edition of the arts programme from the 18th biennial Panafrican Film and TV Festival, in Ouagadougou, Burkina Faso 2006-2100 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: with Neal Conan (Hour Two): "Geography of Thought." A look at how where you live shapes how you think 2030-2100 *BBCWa Jazzmatazz: Quincy Jones In this four-part series presenter Alyn Shipton looks at the remarkable life of Quincy Jones - one of the most influential figures in popular music UT TUE MARCH 4 TUESDAYS St. Casimir Carnival/Mardi Gras/Shrove Tuesday Vermont Town Meeting Day Illinois Casimir Pulaski's Birthday Micronesia (Federated States of) general election 0000-0300 *WHRB SPECIAL CONCERT: William Walton, who died March 8, 1983 0100-0200 *KGOU America Abroad (Part 1): America Abroad examines key issues in international affairs and U.S. foreign policy. It features archival material and original analysis, and provides the historical context essential to understanding pressing international issues. Program topics include: In-depth examination of the crisis with Iraq, relations between the United States and Europe, globalization, North Korea and the security of the Korean peninsula, international war crimes tribunals and the trial of Slobodan Milosevic, and the United States and terrorism 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: While mass demonstrations against globalisation have grabbed the headlines, a more positive challenge to global food and agriculture has been growing. The Slow Food Movement began in Italy in 1986, when McDonald's first opened in Rome. Since then, it has spread around the world. Jill Eisen explores this tantalizing mix of politics, environmentalism and the pursuit of pleasure. Tune in for the conclusion of Slow Food 0106-0200 *MichR Todd Mundt: J. Michael Fay walked across Africa. Fay was the subject of National Geographic's "Africa Extreme" TV special 0206-0300 *MichR The Connection: Two hundred years ago, Chief Justice John Marshall handed down a decision that ultimately made the Supreme Court an autonomous institution. Today, some are arguing whether the court wields too much or too little power 0300-0400 *WHYY JUSTICE TALKING: Do smokers have the right to light up in public? New York City has just banned cigarette smoking in restaurants, bars, bowling alleys and bingo parlors. Is this a victory for worker's rights and the public health or evidence that the nanny state has seized too much power. Join Margot Adler for a debate on individual rights AND the science of second-hand smoke 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Two hundred years ago, Chief Justice John Marshall handed down a decision that ultimately made the Supreme Court an autonomous institution. Today, some are arguing whether the court wields too much or too little power 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: HOMELAND SECURITY: WHAT YOU NEED TO KNOW The rash of terror alerts and the omnipresent fear of another major attack continue to hang over us--but what does the general public really know about responding to a terrorist catastrophe? Our goal is to inform, not alarm. We seek to examine what might be faced in the event of either "conventional" terrorism or bioterrorism, and how you might prepare. The National Strategy Forum, headed by RICHARD FRIEDMAN, has just published the valuable booklet 'PRUDENT PREPARATION: WHAT CAN I DO IN THE EVENT OF A MASS CASUALTY INCIDENT?' that examines a number of relevant topics. Friedman will join us tonight, along with JOSEPH TROIANI, a counterterrorism expert also affiliated with public health issues, and Dr. DOUGLAS PASSARO of UIC, a public health expert specializing in epidemiology and the threat of bioterrorism 0400-0500 *KQED World Affairs Council: "Globalization and Human Rights." Kenneth Roth, executive director of Human Rights Watch. In his nine years in that position, the organization has doubled in size while adding special projects devoted to refugees, children's rights, academic freedom, international justice, and the human rights responsibilities of multinational corporations. 0406-0500 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Discovering Dante, the poet of hell. Why readers still are joining the Dante Club 1330-1400 *BBCR4 Deep Blue: The word 'blue' has been associated with melancholia or depression since the Elizabethan era, but it took the savagery of America's Deep South to turn it into an art form. From cotton plantations like Dockery's near Clarksdale in the Mississippi Delta, back breaking labour was anaesthetised with the Deep South equivalent of wine, women and song - moonshine, ladies of easy virtue and the new, raw music of people like Charley Patton. Washington DC traditional blues singer Michael Roach begins a three-part series in search of the roots of his music, starting in the hill country above the Delta where the fyfe music of Otha Turner has been carried in a direct line from the west coast of Africa 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: The press may get more access to the military for war reporting. After nine on the Connection, discussion about the policy -- and its possible price 1530-1600 *BBCWa The Giving Game is a four-part 30-minute documentary series looking at the growth of non-governmental organizations (NGOs) since World War II. There are now 40,000 international NGOs and millions of local initiatives. Their roots, and the reasons for their growth, are explored. Repeat of Sat 0230 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Voices: Waterworld: Iain Burnside introduces songs with aquatic connotations by composers including Schubert, Wolf and Britten 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: Women & war. If women ruled the world, the old saying goes, there would be no war. Aristophanes thought so. His heroine, Lysistrata, convinced the women of Ancient Greece not to put out until their men put down their arms. Would she stand a chance? 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: Ned Rifkin, director of the Smithsonian's Hirshhorn Museum and Sculpture Garden, http://www.hirshhorn.si.edu about the museum's collection of modern artwork, the special exhibitions currently on display, and his views on modern art 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Wahhabism. Guests: Prof. Muqtedar Khan, Adrian College; Ali Al-Ahmed, Saudi Institute. Followers of Muhammed ibn Abd al-Wahhab (1703-79) believe in unitarianism and hold that all legal decisions must be based upon the Koran and the Sunna. Our guests will discuss these ultra-zealots of the Muslim world, known as Wahabbi, and the role they are playing in today's world of terrorism % 1706-1800 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: The Computer Guys % 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): State-sponsored assassinations and the move to rewrite President Ford's executive order. Guests: Marshall Windmiller, professor emeritus of international relations at San Francisco State University; Tom Sanderson, deputy director of the Transnational Threats Initiative at the Center for Strategic and International Studies; Jack Spencer, senior national security analyst at the Heritage Foundation; and Laura Donohue, acting assistant professor of political science at Stanford University and visiting fellow at Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation 1900-2000 *BBCR2 Howard Goodall's Classical Connections: One of the country's most sought after composers, Bafta winning broadcaster Howard Goodall, presents his first series for BBC Radio 2. Each programme takes a theme and mixes music of all styles and of all eras, emphasising Howard's long held belief that the interplay between different musical traditions is a wholly creative and positive one and that there are surprising similarities and connections between Concert Hall, TV, Film and folk music from around the world. Guests include Vanessa Mae, Michael Nymann, Richard Rodney Bennett, organist Carlo Curley and the BBC Young Musician of the Year, the brilliant 12 year old violinist Jennifer Pike 1. In Love With Shakespeare: Music associated with The Bard includes a recreation from his own time from As You Like It, operatic interpretations by Verdi, Gounod, Webber and Handel, stage music by Mendelssohn, Leonard Bernstein and Cole Porter, and Michael Nymann talking about his own score for Peter Greenaways' film Prospero's Books 1930-2400 *BBCR3 Prokofiev Evening: To commemorate the 50th anniversary of Prokofiev's death, Gerard McBurney presents an evening of speech and music that takes you behind the mask of this enigmatic composer. The 'enfant terrible' of Russian music in his youth, Prokofiev fled the Russian Revolution in 1917 and went into exile in the West. He became one of the leading figures of the avant garde, first in the USA and then in France, where he joined the influential circle around Serge Diaghilev. But he chose to return to the Soviet Union, just when Stalin's purges were at their height. During his last years there he composed some of his greatest works, including the epic opera War And Peace, but eventually fell victim of Stalin's wrath in 1948, and died a sad and broken figure on the same day as the great dictator himself. Throughout the evening, leading Prokofiev specialists and interpreters (including Mstislav Rostropovich, Vladimir Ashkenazy and Valery Gergiev) provide their own views of the composer, punctuated by some of the classic Russian performances of his music. MORE DETAILS 2000-2040 *BBCR4 File On 4: Gerry Northam reports from France on the way the authorities there are fighting the war against terrorism, and asks if Britain has been slow to heed warnings about the threat. [Rptd Sun 1700] 2030-2100 *BBCWe Global Perspective: First of four programmes from broadcasters around the world, giving an insight into the way their country responds to global challenges. This series focuses on immigrants and refugees 2030-2130 *BBCR2 The Sound Of The Movies: Brian Sibley continues to trace the story of music in the cinema. 3. Settling Scores... 2100-2200 *OPB CITY CLUB OF PORTLAND: "Hunger in Oregon" with Rachel Bristol, executive director, Oregon Food Bank and Patti Whitney-Wise, executive director, Oregon Hunger Relief Task Force. The statistics show that Oregon is the hungriest state in the nation. Two of Oregon's most knowledgeable hunger experts outline how we got here and how we can possibly get out of this crisis. http://www.pdxcityclub.org 2230-2300 *KCRW Design & Architecture: a look at the winner of the World Trade Center Site design competition, "Memory Designs" by Studio Daniel Libeskind... 2300-2330 *BBCR4 The Mark Steel Lecture: In the last in the series of his comedy lectures, Mark profiles the life, times and temperament of Napoleon Bonaparte UT WED MARCH 5 WEDNESDAYS French Polynesia Missionary Day Vanuatu Custom Chiefs' Day Muslim, Sufi El am Hejir New Year (may be changed to the nearest day) Ash Wednesday Armenia presidential elections Spain (Aragon) Cincomarzada 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Ideas: Writing Arabian Style. Saudi Arabian author Raja Alem talks with Ideas producer Marilyn Powell about dreams, spells, her childhood in Mecca, and her first novel published in English [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 *WHYY THE TAVIS SMILEY SHOW: We'll talk with a member of the Berkeley College Republicans about their recent Affirmative Action bake sale. Also, hear who made Forbes Magazine's list of the world's wealthiest people. Plus, a conversation with photographer, writer and filmmaker Gordon Parks [or a more complete rundown, originally from WMUB:] (1.) Juvenile Crime -- Tavis Smiley speaks with Dr. Jennifer Woolard, of Georgetown University and one of the researchers involved with the study and Gary Walker, DA, Marquette, Michigan about a new study that says many juvenile offenders aren't competent to stand trial. (2.) AL QUEDA ARREST -- Tavis Smiley speaks to Michael Ratner of the Center for Constitutional Rights in New York, and Dan Goure, Vice President with the Lexington Institute in Arlington, Virginia about what the US governemt says is the arrest of the materhind who planned 9/11 and other major Al Qaeda attacks. (3.) BERKELEY BAKE SALE -- Tavis talks to the UC Berkely Republicans about their recent "affirmative action bakesale." (4.) FORBES LIST -- Tavis talks to Lea Goldman, Senior Reporter Forbes Magazine, about that magazine'slist of the richest people in the world, billionaires. (5.) W.G. STILL PROFILE -- Tavis Smiley Show Producer Roy Hurst brings us this profile of pioneer African American composer, William Grant Still. (6.) GORDON PARKS -- Tavis Smiley interviews legend Gordon Parks about his illustrious and diverse carrer and his latest book, The Sun Stalker 0200-0300 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: Lewis and William Clark set out on "The Corps of Discovery." As we approach this bicentennial, State of Affairs discusses the historic trip that took Lewis and Clark across what would later become the lower 48 United States, from the Atlantic coast to the Pacific. Listen in as we talk about Lewis and Clark's journey. This is an encore broadcast from the Ogle Center at Indiana University Southeast 0206-0300 *MichR The Connection: The press may get more access to the military for war reporting. After nine on the Connection, discussion about the policy -- and its possible price 0230-0300 *BBCWS Global Perspective: First of four programmes from broadcasters around the world, giving an insight into the way their country responds to global challenges. This series focuses on immigrants and refugees 0300-0330 tvCOM CRANK YANKERS: new season debut 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: The press may get more access to the military for war reporting. After nine on the Connection, discussion about the policy -- and its possible price 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: TRACKING THE GREAT AUTHORS WILLIAM BAKER of Northern Illinois University is one of the leading experts on Victorian literature in the United States. But he is also an experienced literary sleuth. He tracks the great works back to their origins, attempting to reach the root thought processes of their authors through letters, notebooks, manuscripts, and other early evidence. Among those he is "investigating" are George Eliot, G H Lewes, Walter Scott, Harold Pinter, Wilkie Collins, Bernard Kops, and Edwin Muir. Our other guest is LARRY LIPKING of Northwestern University, a Samuel Johnson and 18th Century specialist but, like all good English professors, a generalist. On the trail of the great works 0400-0500 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Arthur Sulzberger, chairman of the New York Times Company and publisher of the New York Times; and Howell Raines, new executive editor 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: Discussion about women & war. If women ruled the world, the old saying goes, there would be no war. Aristophanes thought so. His heroine, Lysistrata, convinced the women of Ancient Greece not to put out until their men put down their arms. Would she stand a chance? 0606-0700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny: State-sponsored assassinations and the move to rewrite President Ford's executive order. Guests: Marshall Windmiller, professor emeritus of international relations at San Francisco State University; Tom Sanderson, deputy director of the Transnational Threats Initiative at the Center for Strategic and International Studies; Jack Spencer, senior national security analyst at the Heritage Foundation; and Laura Donohue, acting assistant professor of political science at Stanford University and visiting fellow at Stanford's Center for International Security and Cooperation 1230-1300 *RN DOCUMENTARY: "Black Water, White Water": During the wet season, one-fifth of the world's freshwater flows through the Amazon. It contains more species of fish than all the rivers of North America or Europe. Humans settled along the banks of the Amazon 10,000 years ago. Today people still make a living fishing the Amazon. But some species are disappearing. Scientists are the new explorers of the Amazon - searching for explanations, separating myth from reality, and trying to find solutions to a host of problems. Ginger da Silva explores the Amazon in "Black Water, White Water" – part of Radio Netherlands' River Series. +5965 [repeated at 1500, 0000, 0500 to NAm; and several other times] 1530-1600 *KUNM Bioneers, "Daughters of Thoreau: Not Too Well Behaved." On his deathbed, Henry David Thoreau said his only regret was that he had been too well behaved. Julia Butterfly Hill, Diane Wilson, and Terri Swearingen, three of the most imaginative, inspiring and courageous direct-action heroines of our era, share their experiences and show us how courage and commitment can stop mountains from being moved 1800-1900 *CAINAN THE POINT: The History of Crime and Scandal on Cape Cod Evan J. Albright, author of more than 150 articles for Cape Cod Today on the subject joins Mindy. Mr. Albright also has a web site, capecodconfidential.com dedicated to the subject 1900-2000 *BBCR2 Nick Barraclough: Exactly forty years ago today, on the 5th March 1963, a twin-engined Comanche returning from Kansas City to Nashville crashed killing all on board, including Randy Hughes the pilot, country singers Hawkshaw Hawkins and Cowboy Copas, and probably the greatest female country voice ever, Patsy Cline. Patsy Cline's is quite a story, one of triumph and success, skulduggery, sex and tragedy. Despite being only thirty when she died, a mere six years after she had first appeared on the Arthur Godfrey Talent Scout Show, Patsy's life, both professional and private, has to be one of the most colourful in country music history. Her reputation as a warm hearted, ambitious lady who liked to take a drink and lived a tempestuous life with her husband has become almost as well known as her songs. In a tribute to the doyenne of country music, Nick tells her scintillating and remarkable story with contributions from, amongst others, Brenda Lee, Harlan Howard and former husband Charlie Dick. He also plays the songs that made Patsy Cline irrefutably the first lady of country: I Fall To Pieces, Walking After Midnight and, of course, Radio 2's Country Song of the Millennium, Crazy 2030-2100 *BBCWe Talking Point Special: The Russian Foreign Minister, Igor Ivanov, is Bridget Kendall's guest in a special edition of Talking Point. He's in London as part of an intensive round of diplomacy over a possible war with Iraq 2100-2130 *BBCR4 An Earth Made For Life: The popular view that the earliest Earth was a barren wasteland is probably wrong. Science writer Gabrielle Walker travels to Greenland to see the evidence (blackened rocks with a special chemical character) that life not only survived but probably thrived as far back as geology can take us. And she hears that not only was the Earth apparently made for life; it was also made by life, as the first organisms re-fashioned their own environment 2100-2200 *OPB Justice Talking: in-depth look at the key cases and controversies before the nation's courts. It tackles the differing values that lie at the heart of this democracy showing the Constitution as a living document. Hosted by Margot Adler. This week: Do people have the right to smoke in public or has cigarette smoking become so offensive that it belongs only in the privacy of one's own home? As a public health measure, New York City has just banned cigarette smoking in restaurants and bars. But some are questioning the science on second hand smoke and asking if the nanny state had taken its legislative power a little too far. In this edition of NPR's Justice Talking, Margot Adler hosts a debate between anti-tobacco activist Joe Cherner, founder of SmokeFree Educational Services, and libertarian writer Jacob Sullum, an editor and columnist at Reason Magazine, who wrote the book: For Your Own Good: The Anti-Smoking Crusade and the Tyranny of Public Health. The program was taped before a live audience at Baruch College in New York City and begins with a background report by Amy Eddings of WNYC, a look back at how New York City snuffed out smoking. http://www.justicetalking.org 2130-2200 *BBCWa Global Perspective: First of four programmes from broadcasters around the world, giving an insight into the way their country responds to global challenges. This series focuses on immigrants and refugees 2200-2230 *BCBR2 Masters Of Rock: 1978. Bruce Dickinson continues to chart the evolution of hard rock with the year a new wave of hard rockers reared their heads; Aerosmith, UFO, Cheap Trick, Rainbow and Thin Lizzy all wowed the record buying public. Guitarists world-wide were blown away by an unheard of American band called Van Halen, Black Sabbath fired Ozzy Osbourne and that other shock-rocker Alice Cooper maked a bizarre TV appearance - serenading Miss Piggy on The Muppets 2300-2400 *RFPI ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Stephen Zunes about The Case against War with Iraq. Zunes is a specialist on the Middle East. His articles appear in leading journals and magazines. He teaches at the University of San Francisco and is director of its Peace & Justice Studies Program. He also chairs the Middle East Task Force for the interfaith Fellowship of Reconciliation [+6/12 hours; also Sun 0130++ +7445 and/or 15039] 2330-2400 *CBCR1 Dispatches: Battling for Christ in Latin America. How an American evangelist is using martial arts to win converts in Bolivia [+1/2/3/4 hours] % UT THU MARCH 6 THURSDAYS Ghana Independence Day Brunei Darussalam Hari Raya Aidiladha Norfolk Island Foundation Day St. Colette 0030-xxxx *WNYCf Special: The London Symphony Orchestra: live broadcast from the New Jersey Performing Arts Center; Sir Colin Davis conducts a performance of works by Hector Berlioz 0100-0300 *CBCR2 IN PERFORMANCE: New York Philharmonic`s lastest broadcast 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: First published in 1605, Don Quixote is the story of a man driven mad by books, a self-appointed knight-errant and his adventures on the back roads of Spain. Centuries later, it is considered by many as the greatest novel of all time. Barbara Nichol seeks out the foremost scholars who devote themselves to Cervantes and his book [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-0300 *WFPL STATE OF AFFAIRS: Political cartooning 0230-0300 *BBCWS Talking Point Special; The Russian Foreign Minister, Igor Ivanov, is Bridget Kendall's guest in a special edition of Talking Point. He's in London as part of an intensive round of diplomacy over a possible war with Iraq 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: Her Stories (8pm, 2am): A Women's History Month Special with guest host Dmae [sic] Roberts. This hour will include The Kitchen Sisters at that one-time staple of American housewifery: the Tupperware party; poems by Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Barrson, and Meryn Cadell; as well as sound diaries and audio collages [repeat at 1000] 0400-0600 *KING LIVE BY GEORGE: Seattle Baroque Orchestra broadcast concert. Pachelbel's Canon and Gigue in D, "Three Parts upon a Ground" by Purcell, "Die Pauernkirchfahrt" by Biber and a Sinfonia by Stredella. 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: Josef Stalin-- the once-beloved Soviet leader -- sent millions of his own people to their deaths. Yet he remains one of the most important figures in post- Soviet culture and politics. After ten The Connection remembers "Papa Joe" 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: On the eve of Hans Blix's final report to the United Nations, the United States is accused of strong arming and spying on countries to win support for war with Iraq 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Music Restored: The Itinerant Dowland: Lucie Skeaping looks back on the career and music of the melancholy Elizabethan lutenist, John Dowland. The programme includes his cycle Lachrimae - Seven Tears as well as a selection of his songs and lute pieces 1630-1700 *BBCR4 The Material World: Quentin Cooper talks to the scientists who are developing the next generation of biometric security systems, which identify you by the unique features in the iris of your eye 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Religious Freedom in Afghanistan. Guest: Nina Shay, U.S. Commission on International Religious Freedom which believes that religious tolerance and respect for human rights are essential both to Afghanistan's security, recovery, and reconstruction and to regional stability. Ms Shay will discuss the recent reports the Commission has received on the situation in Afghanistan % 1706-1800 *KQED Forum: Heightened tensions between the US and North Korea following Monday's interception of a US surveillance plane by North Korean fighter jets in international airspace. Guests: Dr. Daniel Pinkston, senior research associate at the Center for Nonproliferation Studies at the Monterey Institute of International Studies; Joseph Bermudez, senior analyst for Jane's Information Group and the IntelCenter and author of "The Armed Forces of North Korea"; Byung-Jae Cho, deputy consul general at the Consulate General of the Republic of Korea in San Francisco; and Nicholas Eberstadt, Henry Wendt Chair in Political Economy at the American Enterprise Institute and author and editor of many books, including "The End of North Korea" and the forthcoming "The North Korean Economy: Between Crisis and Catastrophe." 1800-1900 *CAINAN THE POINT: Vern Laux, The Bird Man of Martha's Vineyard returns to discuss spring migration 1806-1900 *KQED Forum: Uses and abuses of cosmetics and the perception and aesthetics of beauty. Guests: Joe Blasco, makeup artist at Joe Blasco Makeup Schools; Mary Lisa Gavenas, author of "Color Stories: Behind the Scenes of America's Billion Dollar Cosmetic Industry" and past beauty editor at Glamour, Mirabella and Style magazines; Dr. Gary Friedman, plastic and cosmetic surgeon; and Dr. Seth L. Matarasso, MD, dermatologist and associate clinical professor of dermatology at UCSF 1930-2110 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: Beethoven Sonata Cycle: "I shall never crawl --- my world is the universe." In the first of a series of concerts from St John's, Smith Square, comprising the entire cycle of Beethoven Piano Sonatas, Artur Pizarro plays some of Beethoven's earlier sonatas. Sonata No 1 in F minor (Op.2 no.1); Sonata No 8 in C minor (Op.13 - Pathétique); Sonata No 10 in G major (Op.14 no.2); Sonata No 11 in B flat major (Op.22) 2005-2030 *BBCWe One Planet: Living On The Edge, Part 1: Euan Mcllwraith travels to the islands of the South Pacific to investigate the enormous environmental pressures they face, and how they are facing them 2030-2100 *BBCWe A Fresh Start For Africa: Part 3: Will the beginning of the 21st century bring bold new opportunities to Africa or perpetuate previous decades of poverty and conflict? 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Analysis: Interesting Times: New series. David Walker asks if the idea of Britain's 'national interest' has any validity in our globalised, US-dominated world 2100-2200 *BBCR2 Mark Lamarr's Shake, Rattle and Roll: Tribute to the father of country music, Hank Williams, who died fifty years ago and who had almost as big an influence on early rock'n'roll as on country. To prove the point, Mark plays only two tracks by Hank Williams himself and devotes the rest to versions of Hank classics like Hey Good Lookin', Jambalaya and Long Gone Lonesome Blues by rock'n'rollers like Gene Vincent, Jerry Lee Lewis and Marty Robbins 2300-2330 *RFPI MAKING CONTACT: INS Secrets Unveiled: The U.S. War on Immigrants. Civil libertarians and immigrant rights advocates charge that the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), in collaboration with other government agencies, has been stripping away the civil liberties of Middle Eastern immigrants in the name of the so-called war on terrorism. On this edition of Making Contact, correspondents Sarah Olson and Pauline Bartolone examine the treatment of immigrants under new INS policies and practices. We also address whether the rights of U.S. citizens are under threat as well. Featuring: Howard Zinn, author/historian; Allyson Collins, Human Rights Watch; Bill Strassberger, INS press officer; Amer Jubran, a Palestinian refugee; Farouk Abdel-Muthi, a detained Arab immigrant; Jeff Adachi, San Francisco Public Defender; Linda Sharif, Arab-American Anti-Discrimination League; Mark Vanderhaught, National Lawyers Guild; Shelia Patel, Not in Our Name Project [+6/12 hours; also Sun 0130++; +7445 and/or 15039} UT FRI MARCH 7 FRIDAYS Sts. Perpetua & Felicitas 0030-XXXX *WABE BETWEEN THE LINES: Bob Schieffer: This Just In: In This Just In: What I Couldn't Tell You on TV, Schieffer, one of the very few correspondents to have worked all four major Washington beats--the White House, Capitol Hill, the State Department, and the Pentagon--chronicles his life in journalism, his experiences covering some of the big stories of the past four decades, and, most particularly, the quirks of history that often go unreported. "Most of these stories had just been sitting there," says Schieffer, "waiting until I had a place to put them down on paper." 0030-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: Live from Centre Pierre Péladeau in Montreal, Klangforum Wien, the cream of international contemporary music ensembles, performs Montreal Meets Vienna at the New Music International Festival 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: It is one of the most striking social phenomena of our time. For centuries, Latin America was almost exclusively Roman Catholic. But now tens of millions of people are converting to Protestantism. Declan Hill travels to abandoned silver mines, city slums and even Bolivian prisons to meet the converts, and to examine the history and politics of this new religious competition. Hear Part One of The New Reformation - Bolivia [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0205-0230 *BBCWS One Planet: Living On The Edge, Part 1: Euan Mcllwraith travels to the islands of the South Pacific to investigate the enormous environmental pressures they face, and how they are facing them 0230-0300 *BBCWS A Fresh Start For Africa: Part 3: Will the beginning of the 21st century bring bold new opportunities to Africa or perpetuate previous decades of poverty and conflict? 0300-0400 *WQXR The Vocal Scene with George Jellinek: "Remembering Joseph Schmidt" "The great voice of tenor Joseph Schmidt was stilled forever at age 38 under tragic circumstances," says George Jellinek of the Rumanian Jewish singer who gained great popularity before World War II, only to die in a Swiss refugee camp in 1942. He will be remembered in this program, which was originally broadcast in 1994 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: On the eve of Hans Blix's final report to the United Nations, the United States is accused of strong arming and spying on countries to win support for war with Iraq 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: FRESH RECORDINGS FROM THE VAULT: We will be airing a number of new, never before heard recorded interviews this evening. Among them: a talk with JARED DIAMOND, whose wildly popular, Pulitzer Prize-winning book Guns, Germs and Steel: The Fates of Human Societies has just sold its 1 millionth copy. His linking of the history of biological science with the general political course of human history was unique --- and perhaps the key to the book's runaway success 0400-0500 *KQED Alternative Radio: Debate featuring Peter Berkowitz, Rashid Khalidi, Katha Pollitt and Raymond Tanter expressing various points of view on the impending attack on Iraq. Shirley Jahad moderates 0405-0430 *BBCWS Composer Of The Month: Antonin Dvorak: Nick Morgan introduces the first of four programmes on the life and work of the Czech composer Antonin Dvorak 1500-1800 *WILL Special -- Weapons Inspectors Report to UN Security Council 1500-1800 *KQED NPR Special Coverage: UN Weapons Inspectors at Security Council. Hans Blix and Mohammed ElBaradei appear before the UN Security Council to report on Iraq's disarmament and cooperation with inspections. France, Russia and Germany argue that the inspections are working and say they will oppose a new resolution authorizing force against Iraq. What will the chief weapons inspectors say, and what will it mean for the Bush administration's plans? Join NPR's John Ydstie and Tom Gjelten for live coverage of the meeting 1505-1530 *BBCWe One Planet: Euan Mcllwraith travels to the islands of the South Pacific to investigate the enormous environmental pressures which now face them 1530-1600 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: A trip to Quebec's Eastern Townships, to visit the University of Sherbrooke. The university is attracting many top-notch professors, making a name for itself as a centre of excellence and innovation. Yet it's only 50 years old next year - young by university standards! Find out how the university is doing it. That's on C'est La Vie, with guest host Jeanette Kelly [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1600-1630 *BBCR4 Law In Action: With Marcel Berlins. The International Criminal Court is about to begin prosecuting crimes such as genocide. But with the US still hostile, how effective can the process be? 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Jazz Legends: Art Farmer: Julian Joseph introduces recordings by the trumpet and flugelhorn master in conversation with Brian Priestley. Selections include Farmer's Market with tenorist Wardell Gray, Cuse These Bloos with fellow trumpeter Clifford Brown, Whisper Not with the Jazztet, and Ad Finitum, from Farmers 1965 album Sing Me Softly of the Blues, featuring pianist Steve Kuhn 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: Scrabble is the world's favorite word game, with more than 40 million players in the U.S. alone. National Scrabble Association executive director John Williams Jr. discusses Scrabble lore and provides tips on how to become a better player 1606-1700 *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House: Precarious Times and Poetry with Marvin Bell: Iowa's Poet Laureate Marvin Bell shares poetry and insights about the precarious times in which we live and the role of poetry. Bell is the author of seventeen books of poetry and essays, the latest of which is Nightworks: Poems 1962-2000. Called "an insider who thinks like an outsider," Marvin Bell teaches at the University of Iowa Writers' Workshop. Live music by singer/songwriter/poet Jeffrey Hedquist [NOT: pre-empted for Security Council; tsk, tsk, that`s all over the dial, but only WSUI could have emitted Iowa Talks] 1606-1700 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: An adventurous journey with Lewis and Clark, through the foods they ate and the things they saw. Guest: Mary Gunderson, practices paleocuisineology, an approach that brings history alive through cooking. She is a food historian, a lecturer, and the author of several books, including "Oregon Trail Cooking" and "The Food Journal of Lewis and Clark" (History Cooks) http://www.historycooks.com [repeat at 0406] [not pre-empted] 1800-1900 *KUNI Hearst Speakers Series: Sarah Vowell. An exclusive recording of the Feb. 12 appearance at the University of Northern Iowa by author and public radio commentator Sarah Vowell. She talked about her experiences as a contributor for This American Life and shared observations from her new book "The Partly Cloudy Patriot." Vowell's appearance at UNI was part of the 2002-2003 Hearst Speakers Series and was recorded by KUNI in Lang Hall Auditorium 1807-2100 *WUOT FIRST FRIDAY REQUEST & NEW RELEASES 1906-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: live from the Oregon Museum of Science and Industry in Portland 2105-2130 *BBCWa One Planet: Living On The Edge, Part 1: Euan Mcllwraith travels to the islands of the South Pacific to investigate the enormous environmental pressures they face, and how they are facing them 2130-2200 *BBCWa A Fresh Start For Africa: Part 3: Will the beginning of the 21st century bring bold new opportunities to Africa or perpetuate previous decades of poverty and conflict? 2300-0100 *KSUI Know the Score LIVE! U.S. Congressman Jim Leach is our special guest. He will be talking about funding for the arts and humanities and how those areas compete for taxpayer dollars against bread-and-butter programs as well as national defense priorities. He'll also be sharing his love as a collector of WPA art. The LaFosse Baroque Ensemble will play music from the baroque era using original instruments. Our own Poet-in-Residence, Marvin Bell, will read nature poetry, leading us into a preview of the new University of Iowa Museum of Art (UIMA) exhibition "Celebrating the Farm." To conclude our pre-St. Patrick's Day program, Rick Stanley, harp, and Robin Pfoutz, cello, will transport us to the land of Stanley's roots as they play Celtic folk songs as well as original composition by Rick Stanley. Stanley was chosen by the Iowa Arts Council as the 2002 recipient of the traditonal arts award 2306-2400 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: Following up on last week's show – A critique of press coverage regarding U.S./Iraq relations from a pro-war perspective. Guest: Tim Graham, director of Media Analysis MEDIA RESEARCH CENTER 2330-2400 *BBCWa Global Business: Tiger Tales: In a three-part series Christopher Gunness uncovers some little-known yet fascinating stories from across East Asia - history which helps explain many present-day tensions in the region UT SAT MARCH 8 SATURDAYS International Womens' Day St. John of God 0100-0300 *WUGA LITERARY FESTIVAL LIVE BROADCAST: As part of the Athens Literary Festival, WUGA-FM will host a live radio broadcast from Masters Hall at the University of Georgia Center for Continuing Education on Friday, March 7, at 8:00 p.m. The broadcast will feature Georgia authors Tina McElroy Ansa, Freeman Owle, Coleman Barks, and Bailey White reading from their works. Mary Kay Mitchell, news and public affairs manager for WUGA-FM, will host. Seating is available in Masters Hall on a first-come, first-served basis. Doors will open at 7:15 p.m., and all attendees should be seated by 7:45 p.m. For more information, visit the Athens Literary Festival Web site or call WUGA-FM at 542- 9842. (Preempts Roger Dancz's Invitation to Jazz and Jazz Profiles.) 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Shanghai Ladies. Painted posters of beautiful women were used to sell all manner of goods in 1920s China. Broadcaster Christina Wong asks whether these are images of subservience or liberation 0106-0200 *MichR Todd Mundt: You can hear shapes. That statement sounds a bit preposterous at first, but it's true. People can discern the shape of objects they can't see... based on the sound the object produces when struck by someone. It's all in the vibrations. Learn more about this intriguing phenomenon 0130-0200 *BBCWS Jazzmatazz: Quincy Jones: In this four-part series, presenter Alyn Shipton looks at the remarkable life of Quincy Jones - one of the mostinfluential figures in popular music 0130-0230 *RFPI ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Stephen Zunes about The Case against War with Iraq. Zunes is a specialist on the Middle East. His articles appear in leading journals and magazines. He teaches at the University of San Francisco and is director of its Peace & Justice Studies Program. He also chairs the Middle East Task Force for the interfaith Fellowship of Reconciliation [+6/12 hours, +7445 and/or 15039] 0200-0300 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: Al-Jazeera (Arabic for "the island") is an independent all-Arab television news network based in Qatar. This network has access to the Arab world, and has emerged as an international relations ambassador with exclusive access to Osama bin Laden and members of the Taliban. Its has reached the American spotlight through daily exposure on CNN in the U.S. Join us Friday as we discuss news broadcasting in the Middle East and its struggle for a free press and public opinion in the Arab world with Adel Iskandar, co- author of "Al-Jazeera: How the Free Arab News Network Scooped the World and Changed the Middle East." 0200-0300 *WMNR MIXED BAG Classical Music Hour: Classical Music Quiz 0200-0300 *WCNY Cinemusic with Chuck Klaus: IS THAT A CINEMUSIC I SEE BEFORE ME? Scores for Shakespearean Cinema will be on display, with Shostakovich's music for a Russian production of "Hamlet" leading the way. We'll also feature the unique score for the quirky Orson Welles adaptation of "Macbeth" that was penned by Ibert 0206-0300 *MichR The Connection: Malian guitarist Habib Koite blends regional music with western Rock - creating a world music sound of his won. Mali's modern guitar hero brings his musical hertiage to the studio 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE ORIGINS OF LANGUAGE: Most of us don't give much thought to the words we use, why we use them, or their history, but there is a large group of specialists who study those issues intently, believing that language is a reflection of who we are. Linguistics is the study of language (its origins, its structure, and its continuing evolution), and tonight we will be joined by two linguistic scholars who focus on psycholinguistics and the origins (and acquisition) of language -- and how we have come to speak 0400-0500 *KQED Commonwealth Club: Arianna Huffington, author of "Pigs at the Trough: How Corporate Greed is Undermining America." The provocative political commentator and syndicated columnist tells us how and why she believes corporate greed is undermining America, indicting the corporate scoundrels, lawyers, bankers, and Washington insiders who, she says, are "embezzling from the American public while explaining the price we pay for their misdoings." She advocates promoting community solutions to social problems in America, as well as working for campaign and election reform 0406-0500 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: An adventurous journey with Lewis and Clark, through the foods they ate and the things they saw. Guest: Mary Gunderson, practices paleocuisineology, an approach that brings history alive through cooking. She is a food historian, a lecturer, and the author of several books, including "Oregon Trail Cooking" and "The Food Journal of Lewis and Clark" (History Cooks) http://www.historycooks.com 0500-0500 *WBAI Special: International Working Women`s Day Programming - discussion, debate, music, and performances relating to women working in their communities [24 hours straight] 1330-1400 *BBCWa The Music Feature: Don't Touch That Dial A new series, visiting six more countries: Russia, Lebanon, Singapore, South Africa, Spain and New Zealand, highlighting local music and DJs 1405-1500 *CBCR1 That Saturday Show: in the proud journalistic tradition of That Saturday Show, a report on the giant Cheeto corn chip that caused an online sensation, and transformed a town in northern Iowa. Also, meet "Professor Popsicle," a researcher at the University of Manitoba. To study hypothermia, he places his subjects in freezing water for up to five hours at a time. And how's this or chutzpah: a young Dutchman is travelling the world for free. People go to his website, "Let me stay for a day dot-com" and offer him free accommodation and tickets. He'll tell Peter Brown his secrets [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1430-1600 *BBCR4 The Saturday Play: On The Waterfront By Budd Schulberg It's fifty years since the cameras first rolled on this classic story of love, corruption and courage on the New York waterfront. An outstanding American cast stars in this anniversary production, specially recorded in Hollywood in the presence of the Academy Award winning author. Starring as Johnny Friendly ... Hector Elizondo 1605-1659 *CBCR1 QUIRKS & QUARKS: "Sir Isaac Newton: The Myth and the Man." Along with Einstein and Galileo, Sir Isaac Newton is arguably the most famous scientist who ever lived. He's known today for his theory of gravity, the invention of calculus and his work in optics. However, during his lifetime he was better known as the Master of the Royal Mint than he was as a scientist. But after his death, all that changed, and the image of Newton that we have today was born - largely based on myths that he created himself. And you thought the apple really did land on his head ..... Plus - the Universe will end, not with a bang or a whimper, but with a rip ... [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1800-1830 *BBCR3 Jazz File: Fats Waller And The Stride Tradition: Alyn Shipton presents the second of four programmes exploring the history of stride piano. Programme two is entitled Harlem Fuss 1935-1955 *BBCR3 Twenty Minutes in Met Interval: Letters from the New World: Duelling Nationalities. American-English poet and novelist James Lasdun reports on the business of becoming a United States citizen [time approx.; probably Opera News on US net] 2000-2100 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: Battling With Weather: Helen Young examines the extent to which today's professional forecasters are better off than yesterday's amateurs 2000-2100 *WLRN The Changing World: The Body Trade Part 1: Sex Trafficking - The trafficking of women for sex is on the increase. In this program, we'll look into how the Body Trade follows Nigerian girls onto the streets of Rome, Moldovan and Russian girls sold across Europe. Organ Trafficking Trade - All over the world rich people who are ill are prepared to pay huge sums of money for the chance of a normal life. Equally, desperately poor people are driven to sell a kidney as a way of feeding their families 2030-2050 *BBCR3 The Met Opera Quiz: Opera buffs tackle musical teasers submitted by listeners. This week Thor Eckert puts the questions to Henry Fogel, Phillip Gainsley and Fred Plotkin [also US net; time approx.] 2100-2200 *KQED Radio Specials: "Children of War." A KQED Public Radio National Presentation. Exploring current events and issues involving children and military conflict, this one-hour radio documentary takes listeners to battlefronts and refugee camps around the world. From Africa to Iraq, from Indonesia to Chechnya, from Britain to the United States, listeners will learn about groups working to rehabilitate young soldiers and hear how international aid has helped some children rebuild their lives. Hosted by CNN correspondent and Johannesburg bureau chief Charlayne Hunter Gault and produced by Reese Erlich in association with KQED 2200-2245 *BBCR3 The Verb: On tonight's showcase of writing, performance and language Ian McMillan asks do people with dementia lose their language or find a different, more creative one? John Killick has spent many years listening to and writing down the stories, poems and observations of dementia suffererers and for The Verb he explains why he thinks we must learn to understand them. Plus, performance in the studio from some of the new voices on the spoken word circuit 2230-XXXX *WABE BETWEEN THE LINES: Bob Schieffer: This Just In: What I Couldn't Tell You on TV, Schieffer, one of the very few correspondents to have worked all four major Washington beats--the White House, Capitol Hill, the State Department, and the Pentagon--chronicles his life in journalism, his experiences covering some of the big stories of the past four decades, and, most particularly, the quirks of history that often go unreported. "Most of these stories had just been sitting there," says Schieffer, "waiting until I had a place to put them down on paper." 2300-2330 *CBCR1 The World this Weekend: The Media as Opposition: In Venezuela, the privately-owned television stations are leading the fight against the country's leftist leader Hugo Chavez. They regularly run ads urging Venezuelans to oppose their government. As Adam Easton reports, Chavez accuses the stations of supporting a conservative elite, and he's threatening to shut them down. The World This Weekend with Lorna Jackson [+1/2/3 hours] UT SUN MARCH 9 SUNDAYS Belize Baron Bliss Day 0000-0500 *WBAI Special: International Working Women`s Day Programming - discussion, debate, music, and performances relating to women working in their communities -- concludes 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Global Village: in honour of International Women's Day, Jowi and the gang are devoting the entire program to women's voices speaking out for peace, for change, for tradition and for life. From the songs of love of Iraqi singer Farida, to music to fight AIDS with Sista D in Zambia, to music for social justice from Mercedes Sosa in Argentina. Grace Nono celebrates tradition in the Philippines, Marta Sebestyen values history in Hungary and Miriam Makeba remembers her return home to South Africa and more [+1/2/3 hours] 0130-0200 *RFPI MAKING CONTACT: INS Secrets Unveiled: The U.S. War on Immigrants. Civil libertarians and immigrant rights advocates charge that the U.S. Immigration and Naturalization Service (INS), in collaboration with other government agencies, has been stripping away the civil liberties of Middle Eastern immigrants in the name of the so-called war on terrorism. On this edition of Making Contact, correspondents Sarah Olson and Pauline Bartolone examine the treatment of immigrants under new INS policies and practices. We also address whether the rights of U.S. citizens are under threat as well. Featuring: Howard Zinn, author/historian; Allyson Collins, Human Rights Watch; Bill Strassberger, INS press officer; Amer Jubran, a Palestinian refugee; Farouk Abdel-Muthi, a detained Arab immigrant; Jeff Adachi, San Francisco Public Defender; Linda Sharif, Arab-American Anti-Discrimination League; Mark Vanderhaught, National Lawyers Guild; Shelia Patel, Not in Our Name Project [+6/12 hours; +7445 and/or 15039} 0200-0300 *WBEZ Performance Space: North Sea: Buena Vista Social Club with Omara Portuando, Cape Verde's Cesaria Evora [rpt Mon 0500] 0200-XXXX *KUNM Ear to the Ground. Southwest Stages series concludes with Odetta, Queen of American folk music, singing the blues at the historic Hiland Theater. This amazing performance was captured live by Ear to the Ground and features an opening set by Alvin Youngblood Hart, a recent Grammy nominated blues artist 0200-0300 *WQXR George London Foundation Recital Series - tenor Matthew Polenzani, soprano Jennifer Check and pianist Anthony Minoli perform at the Morgan Library 0200-0300 *WOIa First Person: Speaking of Faith: The American public supports the principle of capital punishment. But there is a growing consensus among Jewish and Christian thinkers, across traditional liberal/conservative dividing lines, that it should be abolished in this country or suspended while the system for imposing it is made more just 0300-0400 *WOIa Prairie Lights: One of the great novelists of the South, Lee Smith rarely hits a wrong note. "The Last Girls," already a best-seller, gives us three lifelong friends who attempt to capture a bit of the past by rafting down the Mississippi as they had done as college girls thirty-five years ago 0300-0500 *WUOT SPECIAL: The Vienna Philharmonic in America. 0430-0500 *BBCWe Tiger Tales: In a three-part series Christopher Gunness uncovers some little-known yet fascinating stories from across East Asia - history which helps explain many present- day tensions in the region 1230-1300 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Sheila Dillon celebrates the art of cooking with bones, and considers the relationship between diet and bone health [Rptd Mon 1600] 1305-1400 *BBCWS Newshour: When Is It Right To Go To War? Do you think that war can ever be justified? In an hour long debate, we explore the doctrine of the 'just war' - what religious and ethical beliefs underpin it and assessing its impact on international law and organisations [also at 1800 on WILL] 1311-1600 *CBCR1 The Sunday Edition: Host Michael Enright talks with philosopher Charles Taylor and historian Michael Ignatieff about what it means to be a liberal in today's world. And before Harry Potter... there was Noddy: a look back at the life and occasionally controversial work of Enid Blyton. Also...how valuable is a university education? Does it matter whether you went to the "right" university? [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1330-1400 *BBCR4 Tiger Tales: In the final programme in the series about modern Asian history, Christopher Gunness investigates one of the region's most sensitive subjects - the royal family of Thailand 1400-1500 *BBCR3 BBC Legends: Isaac Stern: In the second of two programmes from the BBC archives about the violinist Issac Stern, Stephen Johnson explores the formation of the Isaac Stern Trio, including a complete performance of the Schubert Trio for piano and strings (D.929) in E flat, recorded in 1968. 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Private Passions: Michael Berkeley talks to one of the world's most distinguished architects. Daniel Libeskind, whose innovative Jewish Museum in Berlin opened to the public in September 2001 to wide acclaim, began his career as a virtuoso pianist, before deciding to study architecture. An American citizen since 1965, he has specialized in major cultural institutions such as museums and concert halls as well as landscape and urban projects, and is currently a leading contender for the design contract to replace the Twin Towers in New York [leading, indeed!]. His musical passions range from Mozart's Musical Joke through Bach, Beethoven, Bartok, Messiaen and Nono to Ornette Coleman's Free Jazz 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Brian Kay's Light Programme: Light music including Andre Kostelanetz and his orchestra, the Raphaele Concert Orchestra and Peter Walden, Charlie Kunz and the Casani Club Orchestra and Haydn Wood 1601-1700 *BBCWS International Recital: six concerts which combine the best of classical and traditional music from across the world. This week: the leading Estonian period-instrument ensemble, Hortus Musicus 1630-1700 *BBCR4 Word On The Street: Poet Jackie Kay travels to the Algonquin Hotel in New York, in search of the sharp wit of a past resident - the writer Dorothy Parker. With New York poets Mary Karr and Sapphire, and readings from Parker's poetry by Kate Harper 1700-1740 *BBCR4 File On 4: Gerry Northam reports from France on the way the authorities there are fighting the war against terrorism, and asks if Britain has been slow to heed warnings about the threat 1700-1745 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: An inspirational depiction of the English landscape, or dewy-eyed sentimentality? Sarah Walker takes an in-depth look at Vaughan Williams's romance for violin and orchestra The Lark Ascending, ending with a complete performance of the work recorded by soloist Yuri Torchinsky with the BBC Philharmonic conducted by Vassily Sinaisky 1700-1800 *KGOU David Freudberg's ~ Beyond War (Part 1): What explains the increasing rate of civilian casualties in war? What does it mean, for soldiers - and for their targets - to drop a bomb or fire high-powered weapons of destruction? What are the physical and emotional effects? What values and beliefs motivate soldiers? How does the military turn ordinary citizens into fighters? How do media portrayals of war compare with the real experience? http://www.pri.org 1700-1900 *KUNI World Choral Spectacular: Last summer, the top-ranked choirs from all over the world came to the Twin Cities to share, learn, and perform at the Sixth World Symposium on Choral Music. Peabody Award-winning host and producer Brian Newhouse brings you the very best in World Choral Spectacular, four two-hour programs that showcase the pinnacle of choral singing, Sundays at 11 a.m. on March 9, April 13, May 11 and June 8. The choirs featured in World Choral Spectacular arrived in the U.S. for the week-long festival only after completing an exhaustive audition process in their home countries. It's an entertaining, enlightening, and easy to listen to celebration. Ensembles like Chanticleer, the Vienna Chamber Choir, the Norwegian Soloists Choir, and the Chamber Choir of Moscow perform a diverse array of repertoire prepared to perfection. With his focus firmly on the music, Newhouse deftly weaves the performances together with insightful set-ups, complemented by compelling comments from the choir members and conductors. 3/9--Hour One: From Minnesota and Around the World St. Olaf Choir (USA)--CHRISTOPH WEYSE: Day Full of Grace; KENNETH JENNINGS: The Lord Is the Everlasting God; SARAH HOPKINS: Past Life Melodies; Adelaide Chamber Singers (Australia)--CLARE MACLEAN: Christ the King; DUNCAN MCKIE: Inland; STEVEN LEEK: Kondalilla; University of Pretoria (South Africa)--PIETER LOUIS VAN DIJK: Horizons; TRAD., South African Folk Songs Hour Two: USA and Canada: Elmer Isler Singers (Canada)-- PETER TOGNI: Ave Verum; HEALEY WILLAN: The Lady Motets; LYDIA ADAMS: Mi kmaq Honor Song; Dale Warland Singers (USA)--JOHN MUEHLEISEN Snow (The King's Trumpeter); FRANK FERKO: Hildegard Triptych 1745-1830 *BBCR3 The Sunday Feature: Stalin. Stalin died 50 years ago this month. In his home country of Georgia his death and his life are remembered in a very different way from other parts of the former Soviet Union or the rest of his world. His statues still stand there, the first toast of an evening meal is often drunk to Stalin in his home town of Gori, he has many and various followers in the country who think of him of as a great Georgian, as well as a great dictator. But like elsewhere, his memory also prompts anger and tears. The historian Catherine Merridale journeys to Tbilisi and Gori to meet Stalin's Georgian heirs - his devotees and his surviving victims, his great grandson and the ninety year old teacher of English who saw her university classmates executed - and to try to understand how Josef Dzhugashvili, the son of a cobbler and destined for the priesthood, became Stalin - both the pride of his people and their worst ever torturer 1800-1900 *KUNM Radio Theater Special, "INET Radio: A Spoof." Bruce King's amusing radio play (inspired by Native America Calling, a national Native call-in show that is produced at KUNM by the Koahnic Broadcast Corporation) addresses cultural trends inspired by Native traditions. The radio play will be followed by an intimate one-on-one conversation between author King and NAC host, Harlan McKosato. Mr. King is one of the winners of KUNM's Radio Play Script Contest, which concluded last September. "INET Radio: A Spoof" was recorded live at the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, and was directed by Beverly Singer (assisted by Maria Williams and Beverly Ortiz-O'Connell) with a cast including Ann Beyke, Kelly Byars, Carlo Garcia, Jon Ghahate, Geneva Horse Chief, Francis Montoya, Patrick O'Connell and Tom Wood. Engineered at the I.P.C.C. by Nola Daves Moses, assisted by Chris Purcell, Brandon Kennedy and Daniel Monroe. Produced by Rachel Kaub for KUNM's Albuquerque Radio Theatre. Special thanks to the Indian Pueblo Cultural Center, which cosponsored the event with the City of Albuquerque's Urban Enhancement Trust Fund and KUNM 1800-1900 *KGOU National Press Club: Myles Brand, President, NCAA discusses "Academics First: A Progress Report" (Recorded Tuesday, March 4, 2003) 1800-1900 *WILL Special -- The BBC's "When is it Right to go to War?" 1805-1900 *CBCR1 Tapestry: Srul Irving Glick: a loving tribute to the great Canadian composer. His Old Toronto Klezmer Suite is a musical tour of Toronto's old Jewish community. Your guide is the violinist Angele Dubeau. She has performed the suite many times, but wanted to visit the locations that Glick described in his music [+1/2 hours] 1900-2000 *WILL MEDIA MATTERS: Mark Weisbrot. He is currently Co-Director of the Center for Economic and Policy Research, in Washington, D.C. He writes a weekly column on economic and policy issues that is distributed to over 400 newspapers by Knight-Ridder/Tribune Media Services. His opinion pieces have appeared in the Washington Post, the Los Angeles Times, the Boston Globe, and The Chicago Tribune, among others. He has appeared on CNN, ABC World News Tonight, C-SPAN Washington Journal, Fox News, and many other national and local television and radio programs. He is co-author, with Dean Baker, of "The Scorecard on Globalization: Twenty Years of Diminished Progress" and Social Security: The Phony Crisis (University of Chicago Press, 2000). 2100-2200 *KBYU SPECIAL PRESENTATION: Discovering Helen Taylor -- Music and memories of this Salt Lake City pianist and composer recalled by her husband and fellow composer and pianist Grant Johannesen. Hear performances of her works including her only symphony 2100-XXXX *WMNR COLLECTORS' CORNER WITH HENRY FOGEL: THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC BERNSTEIN LIVE SET «» Program 1 «» Excerpts from the New York Philharmonic's archival set of Leonard Bernstein broadcasts 2130-2200 *BBCR4 Analysis: Interesting Times: New series. David Walker asks if the idea of Britain's "national interest" has any validity in our globalised, US-dominated world 2215-2300 *BBCR3 Between The Ears: I Send You This Cadmium Red: Lists, poetry, art, history and memories from artist John Christie and writer John Berger triggered by their reaction to the colour cadmium red 2300-2400 *WBEZ Her Stories, a Women's History Month Special: (Hearing Voices) Kim Clark, Dean of Faculty, Harvard Business School 2300-0100 *WHYY INSTRUMENTAL WOMEN: CONDUCTING BUSINESS: Join host Lauren Rico as she highlights both the professional accomplishments of female conductors in the past century and the beautiful music that resulted from their artistic direction. 2330-2400 *BBCR4 Something Understood: The Religious Requirement: Mark Tully considers a recent remark by the Chief Rabbi, Dr Jonathan Sacks, that "The great religions are more than spirituality" UT MON MARCH 10 MONDAYS Greece Green Monday (Lent) Switzerland Fasnacht; Commonwealth Day Australia Labour Day (Victoria) - Eight Hours Day (Tasmania) New Zealand Taranaki Day (Taranaki only) Myanmar Dry Season Celebration Sts. Leonidus & Candidus 0000-0100 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: Citizen Students 0000-0100 *WBEZ National Press Club: Mr. Clark will discuss "Corporate Scandals: Is the Problem with the Apples or the Barrel?" 0015-0045 *BBCR4 OPENING NIGHTS: Russell Davies looks at the stories behind the opening nights of well known musicals. 4. Expresso Bongo First performed at the Saville Theatre on 23rd April, 1958, Time Out claimed Expresso Bongo was the first rock'n'roll musical: it certainly broke new ground with its story-line and gritty music by David Heneker and Monty Norman. It was later to become a film with Cliff Richard, but Paul Scofield topped the bill on the opening night. Lower down the bill were rising stars Barry Cryer and Susan Hampshire. Followed by Bells On Sunday 0100-0200 *WFIU UNCOMMON COURAGE: Viola Liuzzo Story 0100-0200 *WBEZ Human Kind: Beyond War (PRI) The sacrifices of war are often glorified by politicians and the entertainment media. This porgram examines what the actual experience of the war means — physically, emotionally, and environmentally — to both soldiers and civilians 0100-0200 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: Whole Wide World with Christopher Lydon Decoding the riddles of globalization, through the voices of artists, economists, refugees, historians, and plain folk 0100-0500 *CBCR2 2 New Hours: Host Larry Lake welcomes guest host Kelly Marie Murphy for the Finals of the CBC National Competition for Young Composers live from Montreal. Tonight's show begins two hours early, and runs for four hours! Works by Maxime Després, Charles-Antoine Fréchette, Matthew Rizzuto, Louis Trottier, Jean-Michel Robert, Félix Boisvert, Analia Llugdar, Niklas Kambeitz, and Andriy Talpash 0200-0300 *WFIU Bix Beiderbecke: Never the Same Way Twice 0200-0300 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: American Radio Works: Hard Timer 0300-0400 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: Alternative Radio: A debate on attacking Iraq 0300-0400 *WOIa Prairie Lights: Workshop graduate Tom Barbash will read from his first novel, "The Last Good Chance," which may be America's first great urban planning novel 0400-0500 *KUSC A Musical Tour of Eastern Europe: Enesco, Skalkottas, Dimitrov, Bartok 0500-0600 *WBEZ Performance Space: North Sea: Buena Vista Social Club with Omara Portuando and Cape Verde's Cesaria Evora 0500-0600 *WYSO The Home Front 2003 – A Marketplace Special Report: If what the Bush administration suggests is true, time is running out for Americans to get their own personal affairs in order, to be able to deal with the economic realities that lie ahead. David Brancaccio examines the challenges Americans face in a wartime economy in 2003. This important program includes practical advice for listeners thinking about how to prepare their own lives for the domestic effects of war. Special segments on such subjects oil, consumerism, the threat of retaliation, media coverage and government spending will examine assumptions about the economics of war and America's sense of economic security 1515-1600 *BBCWS Commonwealth Day Observance: Live from Westminster Abbey, London, the Observance is multi-faith, multicultural and musical. 2,000 guests are expected, including HM the Queen and representatives of the main Commonwealth religions. This year's theme is 'partners in development' [shuts out non-faith] 1600-1630 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Bones: Sheila Dillon celebrates the art of cooking with bones, and considers the relationship between diet and bone health 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: Edward Seckerson meets Cy Coleman, veteran composer of Big Spender, and plays music from his shows, including Sweet Charity, Barnum and City of Angels 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: John Brady Kiesling Resignation: Career diplomat John Brady Kiesling recently stepped down from his post as a political counselor at the U.S. Embassy in Greece in protest of the administration's policies on war with Iraq. Kiesling joins Diane to explain his decision % 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Topic: Environment At Risk: Guest: Tom Turner: editor of Earthjustice. In his new book JUSTICE ON EARTH Tom Turner writes about the people and organizations fighting to improve the quality of air and water, old-growth forests and wildlife. Earthjustice works through litigation. Turner will discuss some of the organizations major success and what remains to be done % 1800-1900 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: You can find out almost anything at the library, but should the federal government be able to look over your shoulder? American libraries are required by the Patriot Act to make available information on books being checked out, and who's reading them. Library board chariman Richard Gaughn and Library Chief Ann Turner talk about why Santa Cruz County libraries are posting warning signs about this fact. Also, last Wednesday students walked out of several schools and universities in protest against the war. How does a school handle student protest, and how do the students organize one? John focusses on how it happened at Pacific Collegiate, and takes your calls. Assemblyman John Laird finishes the show with his Sacramento Report 2006-2100 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Hour two:THE COMPANY: From Coca Cola to Goldman Sachs to Microsoft, the ubiquity of corporations make it seem like there's never been a time without them. An exploration of the birth and evolution of the revolutionary idea of a "Company". % 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: Greek and Turkish Cypriots have been divided for 40 years. Julian Pettifer reports on the best chance of reconciliation to date 2100-2200 *OPB American Radioworks: "Hard Time: Life After Prison" This ARW special that looks at the impact America's 30-year war on crime has had on communities and families. The war shows signs of winding down - arrest numbers have flattened; "three strikes" laws are being scaled back; the prison building boom is over - but decades of "tough on crime" policies have left the U.S. with 2 million people behind bars and some 600,000 being released from prison each year http://americanradioworks.org 2100-2200 *BBCR2 Live From The Stables: Following on from the huge success of the last series, BBC Radio 2 presents one of the finest big bands in the world with guest appearances from the best known names in Jazz and completely original cross-over performances from some of the highest profile players in Pop. The series is under-pinned by performance and presentation from the Godmother and Godfather of British swing, Dame Cleo Lane and John Dankworth. Thirty-two years ago John and Cleo decided they wanted somewhere intimate and close to home to play music with friends, so they converted the stable block in the grounds of their house. Since then, the newly re-built 400 seat venue has gained an international reputation for the quality and variety of its jazz programming and as a place to hear musicians at their most creative. Presented exclusively for BBC Radio 2, this series offers the finest Big Band in the country under the baton of John Dankworth in support of a diverse array of stars from the worlds of jazz and pop. The series of 6 hour long programmes have all been recorded live and exclusively at The Stables theatre in Wavendon. This is not simply a series of concert relays. It features many new arrangements and compositions from the likes of Craig David, Andy Summers, Alison Moyet and David McAlmont alongside, from the jazz world, musicians like Stan Tracy, Guy Barker, Claire Martin and Julian Joseph. This week UK Pop artist David McAlmont sings classic standards. Jazz star Claire Martin performs with the big band, and trumpet player Guy Barker performs material from his Mercury nominated album, Soundtrack UT TUE MARCH 11 TUESDAYS Lesotho Mosheshoe Lithuania Restoration of the Lithuanian State St. Constantine 0100-0200 *KGOU Speaking of Faith: A Pew Forum On Politics & Religion: a compelling dialogue between former New York Governor Mario Cuomo and Indiana Congressman Mark Souder -- two deeply religious politicians. The conversation was recorded at the Pew Forum on Religion and Public Life held in Washington, DC in October 2002. Former Governor Cuomo and Congressman Souder inhabit opposite ends of the political and theological spectrum -- Cuomo is a classic democratic liberal and a lifelong Catholic; Souder is a neo-conservative and a self-described fundamentalist Christian with Amish roots. Each discusses how he tries to reconcile deep personal religious conviction while serving a pluralistic American constituency. The depth of Cuomo's personal faith is striking, and Souder -- who was the only House Republican to vote against the impeachment of President Bill Clinton -- breaks the stereotype and brings nuance to the term "Christian Right." 0100-0300 *WOIf Des Moines Symphony: Watts, Brahms and Don Juan: André Watts, piano: Schuman: New England Triptych; Strauss: Don Juan; Brahms: Piano Concerto No. 2 0106-0200 *MichR TODD MUNDT: Gerald Shur, founder of the Federal Witness Protection Program 0400-0500 *KQED World Affairs Council: "Economic Turmoil and Political Instability: The Future of Latin America." Economic turmoil and political instability continue to threaten many Latin American countries, as illustrated by recent developments in Venezuela, Argentina, and Columbia. What are the economic prospects for the region as efforts toward democratization continue? Tonight's panelists: Manual A. Gomez¸ professor of law at Universidad Central de Venezuela; Peter Hakim, president of the Inter-American Dialogue; Alan Taylor, professor of economics at UC Davis; and Alan Zarembo, Knight Fellow, Stanford University and Newsweek Mexico City Bureau Chief 1330-1400 *BBCR4 Deep Blue: Blues singer Michael Roach continues the series in which he traces the roots of his music with a look at the birth of Chicago blues. When Muddy Waters quit his job and his woman in Stoval plantation near Memphis, he followed the route taken by millions of other African Americans escaping the deprivation of the Southern cotton fields for the industrial opportunities of Chicago, Kansas City and St Louis. He figured that what they would need most would be the music to which they drank, danced and sang 1700-xxxx *KCUR Up to Date: host Steve Kraske in a conversation with Kevin Klose, NPR CEO 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Topic: Islamic Terrorism in the Philippines. Guests: Paolo Pasicolan: Heritage Foundation; John Gershman: Asia/Pacific editor for Foreign Policy in Focus. The Philippine Government, hoping to stem the tide of terrorism. has offered "the hand of peace" to Muslim rebels who renounce violence but also vowed to crush those who refuse to stop fighting the government. Muslim insurgent groups such as the "Moro Islamic Liberation Front" and the Abu Sayyaf, described by the US as a terrorist organization with links to Osama bin Laden's al Qaeda network, have been fighting for an Islamic homeland in the southern Philippines. We'll talk about Islamic terrorism in the Philippines % 1706-1800 *KQED Forum: Quantum computing. Guest: George Johnson, science writer for the New York Times. He is the author of several books including "Fire in the Mind: Science, Faith and the Search for Order" and, most recently, "A Shortcut Through Time: The Path to the Quantum Computer." With guest host Penny Nelson 1800-1900 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Host Deanna Zachary interviews Dr. Kenneth Kaunda, the first President of Zambia. They'll discuss his opposition to war in Iraq, his friendship with Saddam Hussein, African liberation movements, and AIDS in Africa 1900-2000 *BBCR2 Howard Goodall's Classical... ...Connections: War And Peace: from the days when war was celebrated in the music of Haydn and Handel, and the powerful reaction against it to be found in the spirituals in Tippett's A Child Of Our Time and John WIlliams' haunting score for Schindler's List. We hear from Kneller Hall, the world`s leading academy of military music, from the would-be recruit in Mozart's The Marriage of Figaro and a farewell song from The American Civil War 1900-2200 *BBCR2 various music series; see DAY 1906-2000 *NPR Talk of the Nation with Neal Conan (Hour One): "Who Will Fight?" A quarter of a million Americans are on or near the borders of Iraq, ready for a possible war. Some will fight on the front lines. Many more will operate computers, refuel airplanes and unload trucks. Join Neal Conan for a profile of these men and women and what war may be like for them. Guests: Charlie Moskos, military sociologist at Northwestern University; Mark Lewis, research associate at the Institute for Defense Analysis; Greg Downey, co-author of "The Eyes of Orion"; and Alex Vernon, co-author of "The Eyes of Orion." 2006-2100 *NPR Talk of the Nation with Neal Conan (Hour Two): "Arab Americans." The Arab American experience has changed since nine eleven. Backlash and profiling, yes, but intercommunal embraces as well. Now a pending war with Iraq threatens more change. Join Neal Conan as Arab Americans tell us about their lives in America on the brink of war. Guests: Hussein Ibish, communications director for American-Arab Anti-Discrimination Committee; Nathalie Handal, Arab American writer and poet, contributor to "110 Stories: New York Writes After September 11"; and Nasser Beydoun, executive director of the American Arab Chamber of Commerce 2030-2130 *BBCR2 The Sound Of The Movies: Concluding a four-part series in which Brian Sibley explores the art of writing music for the cinema, featuring contributions from top composers: Necessary Arrangements --- Writing a theme is one thing, arranging it for a full orchestra and adapting it to the varying length and moods of scenes is something else. This week's programme explores the task of arranging and orchestrating, a job sometimes undertaken by the original composer and sometimes by others. Also revealed are the pleasures and pitfalls of 'syncing' and 'dubbing', and the challenge of marshalling the resources of a huge orchestra in order to create a sound sequence that may be heard on screen for only a few seconds 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Dr. Khadhir Hamza, former director of Saddam Hussein's Nuclear Weapons Program 1987-1994, and co-author of "Saddam's Bombmaker." 2130-2200 *BBCR2 Modern Jazz Classics: Branford Marsalis kicks off a new series exploring some of the biggest-selling and most influential jazz recordings of the last 40 years with a look at Herbie Hancock's Headhunters 2130-2200 *BBCR4 The Long View: Jonathan Freedland returns with a six-part series exploring moments in history that have close parallels with events of today UT WED MARCH 12 WEDNESDAYS Burundi Labour Day; Gabon Renovation Day Liberia Decoration Day; Mauritius National Day Zambia Youth Day St. Maximilian 0100-0200 *MichR AMERICAN RADIO WORKS: Hard time, life after prison 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: Trying to understand what makes any city unique, Calgary writer Chris Koentges sets out on a quest to find the intimate heart of his city [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: The European Question: Guests Simon Serfaty, Dir., Europe Program at Center for Strategic and International Studies (CSIS); Craig Kennedy, German Marshall Fund of the United States (GMF). Our guests will discuss the ramifications of war with Iraq and what it will do to our relationship with Europe % 1800-1900 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Glenn Close, Oscar nominated Actress and Narrator of A Closer Walk. Topic: "A Revolution in AIDS Awareness" 1800-XXXX *WILL Special -- Gov. Blagojevich's State of the State address 2100-2130 *BBCR4 Behind The Superficial: Mined Over Dark Matter: Mark Stephen goes down the deepest mine in Europe, only to discover that the site is also a laboratory housing a group of scientists 2305-2400 *WQXR Drive Time with the New York Philharmonic: "Slava and Friends, Part I" -- Mstislav Rostropovich, legendary cellist and conductor, joins the Philharmonic for a three-week festival of music by composers he knew personally, including Britten and Prokofiev. Martha Argerich plays one of her signature concertos, the 3rd piano concerto by Prokofiev - here are featured a movement from Argerich's last Philharmonic visit in May 2001 from Beethoven's Piano Concerto No. 2, led by Charles Dutoit, and the first movement of the Prokofiev performed by Leif Ove Andsnes, led by Valery Gergiev, in 2000. Rostropovich's last performed with the Philharmonic at Opening Night in September 1999, playing the Dvorák Cello Concerto, the last movement of which will be featured on the program, as will be an excerpt from a performance of Britten's Serenade for Tenor, Horn and Strings led by Andre Prévin, with tenor Anthony Dean Griffey and hornist Philip Myers from 2001 2330-2400 *CBCR1 Dispatches: Joan Baxter in Ivory Coast finds all of the elements for ethnic cleansing are in full force there - including the armies ready to do the dirty work. Also, in Cairo, Rick MacInnes-Rae tracks down some of Saddam's old cronies from his days in exile in the late 50s [+1/2/3/4 hours] UT THU MARCH 13 THURSDAYS Iran Tassou'a St. Euphrasia 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: First published in 1605, "Don Quixote" is the story of a man driven mad by books, a self-appointed knight-errant and his adventures on the back roads of Spain. Centuries later, it is considered by many the greatest novel of all time. Why? Barbara Nichol asks the foremost scholars of Cervantes and his book [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0306-0400 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: After Hiroshima, nuclear weapons have been used primarily as a deterrent. The Bush administration could change that. On The Connection after nine, assessing the new US nuclear policy with Nobel Prize winning physicist, Steven Weinberg 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE FUTURE OF INTELLIGENCE: Few doubt that the key element in the war on terrorism is intelligence--and our intelligence community has taken severe admonishment for "failing" to prevent the 9/11 attacks. Has too much emphasis been placed on conventional geopolitical threats, with assumptions that linger from the Cold War? How should we address unconventional threats in a free society? In short, what is wrong with American intelligence and what can be done to fix its myriad problems? Our guest tonight is WILLIAM ODOM, the former director of the National Security Agency (the budget of which dwarfs that of the CIA). A retired lieutenant general of the army and now a professor at Yale, his new book is Fixing Intelligence: For a More Secure America 0330-XXXX *KING LIVE BY GEORGE: Live American String Project broadcast. This conductor-less string orchestra plays transcriptions of a Cherubini String Quartet, Mendelssohn's String Quintet No. 2 and the String Quartet No. 2 by Prokofiev 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: "Children of War." A KQED Public Radio National Presentation. Exploring current events and issues involving children and military conflict, this one-hour radio documentary takes listeners to battlefronts and refugee camps around the world. From Africa to Iraq, from Indonesia to Chechnya, from Britain to the United States, listeners will learn about groups working to rehabilitate young soldiers and hear how international aid has helped some children rebuild their lives. Hosted by CNN correspondent and Johannesburg bureau chief Charlayne Hunter Gault and produced by Reese Erlich in association with KQED 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM: Embedded War Reporters: The Pentagon is allowing more than 500 journalists to accompany U.S. forces in Iraq. If there is a war, they will cover combat directly from the field. Diane will hear different perspectives on the value and implications of this level of access. Brian Whitman, deputy spokesperson at the Pentagon; James Fallows, national correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly % 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Music Restored: Lucie Skeaping explores the music of Thomas Alexander Erskine, the Sixth Earl of Kellie hardly known today, but evidently viewed quite differently at the time of his death in 1781. "His lordship was one of the first musical composers of the age, and esteemed by cognoscenti as the first man of taste in the musical line, of any British subject, and ranked all over Europe in the first musical form." Concerto Caledonia perform music composed by Erskine in Kellie Castle in Fife % 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: American Public Libraries: Mitch Freedman, president of the American Library Association, talks about the possible consequences of state budget cuts for libraries in more than 30 states, plus other issues affecting libraries and librarians % 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: From the 1812 overture to the Fish cheer. The music America hears at wartime. From the summons to Civil War battlefields to the protest songs of Vietnam, The Connection looks at how music reflects the way people feel about fighting [repeat at 0406] 1706-1800 *KQED FORUM: with Michael Krasny (Hour One): In light of the current debate over Iraq, Forum discusses the relevance and future of the United Nations Security Council. Guests: Joel Paul, professor of international law at UC Hastings and director of the International Program at Hastings; and Charles Hill, research fellow at the Hoover Institute, special consultant on policy to the secretary-general of the UN (1992- 1996), and author of "Unvanquished" with Boutros Boutros-Ghali 1800-1900 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: We hear from Bonny Doon resident Andy Goldberg, news editor for the German Press Agency, about what he's seeing behind the scenes at the UN Security Council and in Washington.He'll also and compare US and foreign coverage of the Iraq crisis. Also, Crystal Cruise Lines' recent admission that one of their ships dumped in the Monterey Bay Marine Sanctuary has prompted a new focus on regulating cruise lines. Chris Krohn talks with Vicki Nichols of Save Our Shores, Monterey Harbor Master Steve Sheilblauer, and Assemblyman John Laird. Thursdays also feature Bill Monning's digest of the week's headlines in the Monterey Bay area 1900-2100 *KUSP The Open Road: John [sic] Sandidge invites you to join her on the open road, with a giveaway at 11:30, The Isle Of Light for "live at Lunch" at noon, talking about the real story of St Patrick, and Steve Polipoli of the Santa Cruz Metro offering the top ten bands to hear in the week ahead. 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Smoking once was considered a symbol of glamour and sophistication, but it's been targeted by doctors, lawyers, and lawmakers. Are they going too far -- or not far enough? % 2030-2100 *BBCWe Return To Vietnam: Two-part documentary about Vietnam. A musician returns after 41 years in exile in Paris and samples a variety of musical events around the country % 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Analysis: Strange Bedfellows: Thirty years after the sexual revolution, Margaret Doyle asks why we are still so keen to invite the state to interfere in our private relationships. [Rptd Sun 2130] % 2100-2130 *BBCR4 Leading Edge: Geoff Watts investigates attempts to deliver a pathogen-free blood supply... % 2100-2200 *BBCR2 Mark Lamarr's Shake, Rattle & Roll: Mark salutes the songwriting genius of Jerry Leiber and Mike Stoller, collaborators on such classics as Hound Dog, Jailhouse Rock and Yackety Yak % UT FRI MARCH 14 FRIDAYS Muslim, Sufi Ashura - Moharram/Dr.Babu Jagjivan Ram (may last 2 days) Andorra Constitution Day St. Matilda 0030-XXXX *WABE Between the Lines: Aryeh Lev Stollman: The Dialogues of Time and Entrophy: Stollman's career began with stories that have appeared in leading literary journals, including American Short Fiction, The Yale Review, The Southwest Review, Tikkun, and Story magazine. Collected in The Dialogues of Time and Entrohpy, they address the themes he has grappled with so memorably in his acclaimed novels: "the pull of the past over present and the profound effects that one person can have on another" (San Francisco Chronicle); the aftershocks of the Holocaust; the convergence of science, the imagination and the spiritual realm; and the way art can shape our humanity [rpt Sat 2230] 0100-0200 *WCPN Voices of Public Intellectuals: Women and the Law: "The Asymmetry of Citizenship" --- Linda Kerber examines some of the ways that the meanings of citizenship have been—and continue to be—different for men and women 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: It is one of the biggest social phenomena of our time: for centuries, Latin America was almost universally Roman Catholic. But now, tens of millions of people are converting to Protestantism. Declan Hill travels to abandoned silver mines, city slums and even Bolivian prisons to meet the converts, and to examine the history and politics of this new religious competition [+1/2/3/4 hours; part ? of ?] 0106-0200 *WPRi On Point: Portraits From the Frontlines of War. Firsthand reports from the front-in-waiting. We talk with war correspondents around the Gulf, from the deserts of Kuwait to the deck of the USS Lincoln, for the latest on troops, morale, sand storms, and readiness. Voices from the edge of war. GUEST(S): Carol Williams, correspondent embedded on the USS Lincoln for The Los Angeles Times; Scott Calvert, correspondent embedded with the 101st Airborne for The Baltimore Sun; Yaroslav Trofimov, Middle East and Mediterranean correspondent for The Wall Street Journal; Rick Atkinson, Pulitzer Prize-winning correspondent embedded with the 101st Airborne for The Washington Post and author of "Crusade: The Untold Story of the Persian Gulf War"; Thomas E. Ricks, Pulitzer Prize-winning military correspondent for The Washington Post and author of "Making the Corps" and "A Sodier's Duty." 0106-0200 *MichR Todd Mundt: Ancient Greece was the cradle of western democracy... as well as science, rationalism - and also witchcraft. Lots and lots of witchcraft. Recent finds suggest the practice persisted into the late Roman Empire 0200-0300 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: In the 60's, student activism raged along with the Vietnam War. Now we don't hear a great deal about activism on campus - are the days of student activism passed? On Thursday, we'll discuss the issue with students and a student mentor at The Ogle Center at Indiana University Southeast. This show is free and open to the public 0205-0230 *BBCWa One Planet: Living On The Edge Euan McIlwraith travels to the islands of the South Pacific to investigate the enormous environmental pressures which now face them. He also looks at how the individual small communities there are launching innovative projects to meet the challenge % 0206-0300 *MichR The Connection: Tony Blair's support for George Bush and hard line against Iraq has some in the British Labor Party saying that regime change should begin at home. Can Blair survive the greatest political crisis of his career? 0230-0300 *BBCWa Return To Vietnam: Lucy Duran presents two programmes from Vietnam, joined by musician Tran Quang Hai who makes the long journey home for the first time after 41 years of exile in Paris. They sample a variety of musical events and performances from around the country % 0300-0400 *KUSP Special: Californians on War: As time runs out for Saddam Hussein, Californians are deeply divided over Iraq. Polls show most state residents think he's a menace, but they question President Bush's push for war. at 7 pm for a special statewide conversation hosted by Scott Shafer. Hear how people throughout California are feeling about a possible war, and call in with your own thoughts to 1-800-811-6830 0300-0400 *KQED The California Report with Scott Shafer: "Californians on War." [as above...] Voices from throughout the state will include Iraqi-Americans, religious leaders, and military families as well as Editorial Page Editors, and your phone calls 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Tony Blair's support for George Bush and hard line against Iraq has some in the British Labor Party saying that regime change should begin at home. Can Blair survive the greatest political crisis of his career? 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: TBA, but always worth checking 0400-0500 *KQED National Press Club: Dr. Elias Zerhouni, president of the National Institute of Health % 0400-0500 *WHYY BEEN THERE DONE THAT with Marty Goldensohn: Take an acoustical tour of the world. First, discover how broccoli can save your hearing. Then, fine tuning a state-of-the-art concert hall, Rachel Carson's sounds of the sea, how insects use plants to stay in touch, and the evolution of human chatter. Plus, a lesson in listening from two U.N. interpreters, a defense of silent movies, and the invention of the Moog synthesizer. Visit our website at http://www.whyy.org/btdt for information, links and all our archived programs. 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: From the 1812 overture to the Fish cheer. The music America hears at wartime. From the summons to Civil War battlefields to the protest songs of Vietnam, The Connection looks at how music reflects the way people feel about fighting 1320-1340 *WBAI segment about Iraq, radio propaganda [3-041] 1500-1600 *NPRN LIVE FROM THE MILL: We'll again be at the Lied Center for Performing Arts with guest pianist and host of PRI's From the Top, Christopher O'Riley, who did a solo piano performance at the Lied last Tuesday, has been in residence at UNL all this week, and will be in residence at Hastings College on Saturday 1505-1530 *BBCWe One Planet: Living On The Edge: The environmental pressures facing islands in the south Pacific and how the small local communities there are dealing with the challenge 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM: News Roundup: In a WAMU 88.5 FM co-production with Live ... from National Geographic, a panel of journalists joins Diane at the National Geographic in downtown Washington, DC to review and analyze the week's top national and international news stories before live audience % 1506-1600 *WHYY RADIO TIMES: RADIO TIMES with Marty Moss-Coane Hour One: Who is Karl Rove? Some suggest he's Bush's Brain. We'll talk with Wayne Slater, co-author of the new political biography "Bush's Brain: How Karl Rove Made George W. Bush Presidential." Slater is the Austin Bureau Chief for the Dallas Morning News. He covered Bush's two-terms as Governor of Texas, and his Presidential Campaign and watched role Karl Rove played during those years 1506-1600 *WFPL THE CONNECTION: Public Opinion And The Cost of War: Polls show that Americans approve of invading Iraq. But a new report questions whether the public has been fully informed about the sacrifices Americans will need to make long after the 101st Airborne is back home 1530-1600 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: A look at why Haitian Creole is flourishing in Montreal. Long considered the illegitimate offspring of the French language, Haitian Creole has slowly been gaining a credibility of its own. Today, more than 40-thousand Quebeckers speak the language, and young Montrealers are starting to pick it up on the streets [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1530-1600 *BBCWe Two-part documentary about Vietnam. A musician returns after 41 years in exile in Paris and samples a variety of musical events around the country 1530-1600 *BBCWa Sports International: The Nation: Alex Capstick investigates the different ways sport can affect a nation. While there are many examples of how sport can unite a nation, its divisive qualities are just as potent and sometimes destructive % 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Jazz Legends: Quincy Jones: Julian Joseph explores the early jazz work of this profilic composer and arranger whose 70th birthday it is today. Selections include his first recorded trumpet solo with the Lionel Hampton Orchestra in 1951, his early arrangements for the Art Farmer Septet, and tracks from the 1957 album This Is How I Feel About Jazz featuring Farmer, Zoot Sims and Charles Mingus 1600-1700 *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House: Catfish Keith: Blues singer, songwriter and bottleneck slide guitarist Catfish Keith performs live and talks about his career. A two-time W.C. Handy Award nominee for Best Acoustic Blues Album, Catfish Keith has produced eight number one independent radio chart-topping albums. The twenty-year veteran has toured the UK and Europe dozens of times, appearing with legends John Lee Hooker, Ray Charles, Robert Cray, Koko Taylor, and many others 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: Abdo & Lyons: Answering Only To God (Henry Holt): Diane's live broadcast from National Geographic continues. Husband and wife Geneive Abdo and Jonathan Lyons join Diane to talk about what they saw when they became the first U.S. journalists allowed to work in Iran after the 1979 revolution. They'll discuss changes underway in Iranian society and the limitations that persist % 1606-1700 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: How green tea is not only one of nature's most powerful healers, but also one of the most versatile and flavorful ingredients in your kitchen. Guest: Ying Chang Compestine, teaches cooking at the Boulder Heart Institute and at various institutes across the country. She is the author of several books, including "Cooking With Green Tea" (Avery Penguin Putnam) 1606-1700 *WHYY RADIO TIMES: Hour Two: Smell is a twenty billion dollar industry. Everything from Chanel No. 5 to Clorox bleach depend on it. Now scientist Luca Turin has figured out exactly how our sense of smell works and his theory may turn the industry upside down. Our guest, author Chandler Burr tells Turin's story in the book "Emperor of Scent: A Story of Perfume, Obsession, and the Last Mystery of the Senses." 1606-1700 *WFPL THE CONNECTION: Amandla! Singing for Freedom. The film, "Amandla! A Revolution in Four Part Harmony" and the role music played in fighting and bringing about an end to apartheid in South Africa 1800-1830 *KUSP Fine Print: Rick Kleffel talks with Carter Scholz live in the studio about blurring the lines between science and fiction, and how we live in a future NOT predicted by the first generation of science fiction writers. His novel is Radiance, out in trade paperback, and his latest book is The Amount to Carry, a collection of slipstream short stories. The interview, planned for last week, was pre-empted by coverage of the UN Security Council meeting. Buy the books you hear about on Fine Print—a portion of the proceeds go to Central Coast Public Radio, KUSP 1800-2000 *WUGA INSTRUMENTAL WOMEN: Comparing Notes: Celebrating Women's History Month and continuing the Instrumental Women series, this program shares more untold stories of women composers and addresses the impact their missing narratives have had on the female composers of today. The program also examines current obstacles in the world of classical music that don't involve gender, but have more to do with time and the marketplace. Composers Libby Larsen, Joan Tower, Augusta Read Thomas, and Judith Lang Zaimont join host Lauren Rico to discuss pressing questions facing the industry 1906-1959 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: Plans to test the E-bomb on Iraq (Electromagnetic Pulse) is one of several topics % 2006-2059 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: Gulf War Illnesses: A look at the latest in research into the causes of Gulf War Illnesses, a collection of mostly unexplained medical symptoms experienced by some veterans of the Persian Gulf war. We'll also find out what medical precautions are being taken to protect soldiers now in the region 2006-2100 *WBEZ THE TAVIS SMILEY SHOW: We'll talk about why the term "middle class" is often a misnomer in the black community. Also, we'll pay a birthday tribute to legendary producer Quincy Jones. Plus, Friday laughs with actor and comedian Paul Rodriguez 2105-2130 *BBCWa One Planet: Living On The Edge: Euan McIlwraith travels to the islands of the South Pacific to investigate the enormous environmental pressures which now face them. He also looks at how the individual small communities there are launching innovative projects to meet the challenge % 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: guests take a look at the person who many think is really calling the shots at the White House. Guests: James Moore and Wayne Slater, political journalists, and authors of "Bush's Brain: How Karl Rove Made George W. Bush Presidential" (Wiley) 2130-2200 *BBCWa Return To Vietnam: Lucy Duran presents two programmes from Vietnam, joined by musician Tran Quang Hai who makes the long journey home for the first time after 41 years of exile in Paris. They sample a variety of musical events and performances from around the country % 2215-2330 *BBCR3 Andy Kershaw: Kershaw In Ethiopia: For Comic Relief's Red Nose Day 2003, Andy goes on the road in a country with a rich musical tradition, a troubled political past, and a looming humanitarian crisis. He visits some of the Comic Relief-sponsored projects in Addis Ababa, including Street Symphony, which offers food, shelter and music coaching to homeless children, and he travels to the south, which is facing a drought as severe as during the famine of 1984 2306-2400 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: The movie and subsequent blacklisting, of "Salt of the Earth" which depicts the history of a far left union. Guest: Jonathan Wacks, co-chair SALT of the EARTH CONFERENCE chair Moving Image Arts Department College of Santa Fe UT SAT MARCH 15 SATURDAYS Palau Youth Day Belarus` Constitution Day; Liberia J.J. Robert's Anniversary Hungary Anniversary of the Revolution 1848-49 St. Louise de Marillac 0100-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: From the Winspear Centre in Edmonton, a lively and colourful concert from the Teka Ensemble of Hungary. They perform traditional Hungarian village songs and dances on violin, viola, cello and double bass spiced up with lute, bagpipe and hurdy-gurdy 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: Canada has always tried to re-invent identity and community. The Right Honourable Beverley McLachlin, Chief Justice of Canada, says that human dignity must always be at the heart of community. Tune in for the 2003 Lafontaine- Baldwin Lecture [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 *WHYY TAVIS SMILEY: THE TAVIS SMILEY SHOW: We'll talk about why the term "middle class" is often a misnomer in the black community. Also, we'll pay a birthday tribute to legendary producer Quincy Jones. Plus, Friday laughs with actor and comedian Paul Rodriguez 0200-0300 *WCNY Cinemusic with Chuck Klaus: ISLE OF VAL LEWTON. (Say the title aloud.) Now that we know you're a Val Lewton fan, we'll salute the masterful producer of subtle fright fare with several scores written by the master cinema composer Roy Webb. We'll hear selections from "Cat People," "Bedlam," "The Body Snatcher," and the immortal film "I Walked with a Zombie." 0305-0400 *ABCRN RADIO EYE: Dream Deferred (Sound print USA): Jimmy from India and Juan Pablo from Honduras are in some ways, just regular teenagers. They're also just two of the 5,000 unaccompanied children who arrive in the US each year seeking asylum. Jimmy escaped from a stepmother who beat him and a father who ignored him. He dreamed of a loving family. Juan Pablo left a life of manual labour that began at age six. He dreamed of an education. Both were smuggled in, arrested at the border and locked up for months. Jimmy and Juan Pablo are finally living pieces of the dreams that they came here for. But with their asylum cases pending in court, their futures remain uncertain 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: TBA, but always worth checking [Later:] Was there really a Sherlock Holmes? 0330-XXXX *KING LIVE BY GEORGE: The American String Project live broadcast. Arrangements for string orchestra of Mozart's "Dissonant" String Quartet No. 19 in C Major, Beethoven's String Quartet No. 11 in f minor and Tchaikovsky's Serenade for Strings 0400-0500 *KQED Commonwealth Club: An address by former White House Chief of Staff Leon Panetta, who sees a destructive tendency towards partisan warfare in Washington and is sharply critical of the Bush Administration's unilateral military actions against Iraq 0406-0500 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: How green tea is not only one of nature's most powerful healers, but also one of the most versatile and flavorful ingredients in your kitchen. Guest: Ying Chang Compestine, teaches cooking at the Boulder Heart Institute and at various institutes across the country. She is the author of several books, including "Cooking With Green Tea" (Avery Penguin Putnam) 1200-1230 *RN AMSTERDAM FORUM %: panel on Iraq +5965 +other times 1200-1300 *WOIa Justice Talking: AOL, Time-Warner, Disney, Clear Channel. Media companies are growing bigger and more powerful. And now, the FCC is reviewing its rules over broadcast ownership. Join Margot Adler for a debate on media consolidation and the public interest 1300-1330 *BBCR2 The Smith Lectures: This week Professor Arthur Smith presents a special University of Tooting Bec 27 minute degree course, which attempts to cram the best bits of the greatest works of literature - ranging from the contents of the humble toilet wall to the sonnets of Shakespeare - into just one improving lecture. The majesty of the printed word will be represented as usual by a selection of otherwise unconnected comedy clips; including Jack Dee and Peter Eldon on the importance of learning to read; Felix Dexter on Jane Austin and a short story from Sheila Hyde, Vivian Stanshall and Les Dawson. The pre-history of the written word - or Talking - will be revealed by Tim FitzHigham and An Infinite Number of Monkeys and the dangers of deviating from a prepared script will be illustrated by unintentional material from Sidney James, Adam Hills and Elvis Presley. Plus further inspirational readings from the likes of Neil Hamburger, Diane Ford and Robin Williams 1300-1400 *BBCR3 World Routes: Lucy Duran presents the first of two special concert editions of the programme, both given by winners of this year's Radio 3 Awards for World Music. This week the legendary Orchestra Baobab from Senegal perform their unique and uplifting Afro-Latin hybrid at the Shepherds Bush Empire in London. Last year they got back together after 20 years apart and released the album Specialist In All Styles to much critical acclaim 1330-1400 *BBCWa The Music Feature: Don't Touch That Dial Another of the series in which we visit six more countries: Russia, Lebanon, Singapore, South Africa, Spain and New Zealand, highlighting local music and DJs. This week: Liz Barry in New Zealand 1330-1400 *RN AMSTERDAM FORUM %: panel on Iraq +5965 +other times 1405-1500 *CBCR1 That Saturday Show: Canadian Bob Cull spent a year utterly alone (except for his cat) on an island off the southern tip of South America. He'll talk about his year in deep solitude. Japanese tourists spend thousands of dollars to travel to Whitehorse for a glimpse at the northern lights. Find out if they think it's worth the trip. And as the rest of the country has been freezing, citizens of the west coast have been strolling around in T-shirts. Peter Brown confronts Vancouverites with the resentment of a frozen nation [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1530-1600 *RN AMSTERDAM FORUM %: panel on Iraq +15220 +other times 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Audience Profiled: Crowd Control: John Florance traces the changes in etiquette in listening to classical music in concert halls over the centuries. At the first ever public concert in 1672, people could request favourite pieces and ale was served throughout the evening. Today, we are expected to sit in total silence in concert halls and woe betide the person who needs to sneeze or cough during the music. So how have we journeyed from the atmosphere of a tavern brawl to the hallowed silence of a cathedral whilst listening to classical music over the years? And how might audiences behave in the future? 1905-1925 *BBCR3 Twenty Minutes: Bad Advice: A letter from America by Indian-born novelist and banker Akhil Sharma, who reflects on the collected wisdom his family was offered before leaving Delhi for New York [as Met Opera interval; else on US & other nets, probably Opera News; time approx.][NO: US net ran Opera Quiz at this time. That`s because the LIVE broadcast as on US net started way early at 1700, but BBCR3 delayed it until usual 1830 start] 2000-2100 *WLRN The Changing World: The Body Trade Part 2: Trafficking for Labour - Explore how millions of people across the world are traded for their labour, and shackled to employers by debt. Trafficking Babies - In this program we report on the global adoption scam - how rich people are buying babies for huge sums believing them to be "orphans" when they are not 2000-2100 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: Wheeler At 80: Jeremy Paxman presents an 80th birthday look at the extra-ordinary career of award- winning journalist Charles Wheeler, from wartime espionage agent to foreign correspondent 2035-2100 *BBCR3 The Met Opera Quiz: Opera buffs tackle musical teasers submitted by listeners. This week Thor Eckert puts the questions to Speight Jenkins, Bill Lutes and Suzanne Martinucci [on US net was already at 1905] 2100-2200 *BBCR2 My Aim Is True: The Elvis Costello Story: Phill Jupitus presents the first in a two-part programme profiling the life and career of Elvis Costello. Part 1. Pay It Back: Former computer operator Declan MacManus gets his revenge on a previously indifferent record industry by becoming Elvis Costello and conquering the charts with a series of critically acclaimed releases, including the albums My Aim is true, This year's Model and Armed Forces. But things go horribly wrong when he attempts a repeat performance in the United States 2100-2200 *KQED Radio Specials: Voices of Public Intellectuals: Women and the Law : "The Asymmetry of Citizenship." Tonight's speaker is Linda Kerber from the University of Iowa. The language of equality in American law and tradition is wholesomely generic, but the practices of citizenship have not always been practices of equality. Kerber examines some of the ways in which the meanings of citizenship have been, and continue to be, different for men and for women 2200-2300 *KQED Soundprint: Segment One: "Loida and Johanna Go to Flin Flon." Flin Flon, in Manitoba, Canada, is said to be the only city in the world named after a character in a science fiction story. In 1915, gold prospectors stumbled across a dime store novel abanadoned under a tree. They read a chapter or two, and discovered Flintabatty Flonatin, a man who found an underground city of gold in his submarine. They called their new town Flin Flon. A decade later, the Canadan National Railway came to town, bringing with it miners from all over the world. Segment Two: "After Sorrow." "After war, the people you meet differ so from former times," wrote the Vietnamese poet Nguyen Trai in the early 15th century. Americans are still searching for answers to the Vietnam conflict, and the conflict that lives on in the collective mind and soul of this country. American writer Lady Borton is one of the few who has explored the North Vietnamese point of view in trying to reach an understanding of what happened and why. Borton was the first American journalist given permission by Vietnamese officials to speak with ordinary villagers and to live with a village family 2230-XXXX *WABE Between the Lines: Aryeh Lev Stollman: The Dialogues of Time and Entropy: Stollman's career began with stories that have appeared in leading literary journals, including American Short Fiction, The Yale Review, The Southwest Review, Tikkun, and Story magazine. Collected in The Dialogues of Time and Entropy, they address the themes he has grappled with so memorably in his acclaimed novels: "the pull of the past over present and the profound effects that one person can have on another" (San Francisco Chronicle); the aftershocks of the Holocaust; the convergence of science, the imagination and the spiritual realm; and the way art can shape our humanity 2330-2400 *BBCR4 Word On The Street: Poet Jackie Kay travels to the Algonquin Hotel in New York, in search of the sharp wit of a past resident - the writer Dorothy Parker. With New York poets Mary Karr and Sapphire, and readings from Parker's poetry by Kate Harper UT SUN MARCH 16 SUNDAYS Finland parliamentary elections El Salvador elections to the legislature 0030-0100 *RN AMSTERDAM FORUM %: panel on Iraq +6165 9845 +other times 0130-0230 *RFPI ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Peter Kornbluh about The Other September 11: Chile 1973. September 11 is now engraved on the consciousness of Americans. Yet for the South American country of Chile, the date has a different and much more tragic significance. It was on that day in 1973 that the democratically-elected government of Salvador Allende was overthrown in a CIA-backed military coup. Augusto Pinochet seized power. In the ensuing years tens of thousands of Chileans were killed, jailed, tortured and driven into exile. The US role, under Nixon and his National Security Advisor Kissinger, in first destabilizing and then overthrowing the Allende government was decisive. It will rank among the most grotesque interventions ever undertaken by the US. A few years after the coup, Nobel Peace Prize- winner Kissinger visited Chile. He told General Pinochet, " In the United States, as you know, we are sympathetic with what you are trying to do here." Peter Kornbluh (Korn-blue) is senior analyst with the National Security Archive in Washington DC. He is the author of "The Pinochet File." [+6/12 hours] +7445 15038 0200-0300 *WBEZ Performance Space: Buena Vista bassist Cachaito Lopez and Olu Dara 0200-0300 *WOIa On Iraq's Borders: Inside Out: An hour-long documentary from Senior Correspondent Michael Goldfarb of WBUR's Inside Out Documentaries. Goldfarb traveled extensively in Jordan and Turkey finding out first hand how connected Iraq is with its neighbors and how the prospect of war is impacting the stability of a region that already has so many vulnerable fault lines 0300-0400 *WOIa Prairie Lights: Tim Fay and his crew from the Wapsipinicon Almanac will be down again with some laughs and lore from the hinterlands. The Wapsipinicon Almanac has become an annual event at Prairie Lights and patrons have come to expect their presence to mean an unalloyed good time 0400-0500 *WHYY AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Before Arabs ever set foot in North Africa, the majority population was Berber. Berber musicians today provide a rich but often overlooked contribution to the musical landscapes in countries such as Morocco, Algeria, Tunisia, Niger, and Mali. This program spotlights some leading contemporary Berber artists including Takfarinas and Tayfa, and legends like Matoub Lounes and others in the international Berber Diaspora such as Houssaine Kili. The Berber story is one of intrigue, controversy, and the politics of language. And the music is sublime! 0500-0530 *RN AMSTERDAM FORUM %: panel on Iraq +6165 9590 +other times 0500-0600 *KQED Studio 360 with Kurt Anderson: Studio 360 blurs the boundaries. Andersen and jazz scholar Robert O'Meally find out how the most interesting things in art happen on the borders and edges. A band from Brazil refuses to be classified according to any musical category, and suffers for it. Lenny Bruce crosses a line and changes comedy as we know it, and residents on the US-Mexico border puzzle over the art project on the steel fence that divides them 1230-1300 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Andrew Jefford raises his glass to traditional British beers and wonders why our national drink has yet to capture the gourmet imagination 1300-1400 *BBCWS The Iraq Crisis... ... What's At Stake For The World?: Featuring BBC specialists including Baqer Moin and Greg Barrow 1400-1500 *BBCWS Talking Point: the possibility of war on Iraq, with or without the backing of the UN, with John Simpson in Northern Iraq as one of the guests 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Private Passions: Michael Berkeley talks to Jon Lord, the classically-trained keyboard player of the rock group Deep Purple. In 1969 Jon Lord made a pre-emptive strike for 'crossover' when his 'Concerto for Group and Orchestra' was performed at the Royal Albert Hall, conducted by Sir Malcolm Arnold. Today he reveals some of the influences on his own music, including works by Stravinsky, Vaughan Williams, Bach, Bartok and The Beatles 1601-1700 *BBCWS International Recital: In the last programme of this year's series, you can hear the Dutch cellist Pieter Wispelwey, and the Croatian pianist Dejan Lazic. They will be performing music by Beethoven, Schumann, Reger and Chopin. Presented by Martin Handley 1700-1745 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Few composers were capable of disguising the complexity of their music as well as Franz Schubert. Chris de Souza explores the hidden workings of Schubert's Piano Sonata in G (D894), with the help of specially-recorded musical illustrations performed by pianist Tim Horton. The work can be heard in full in Thursday evening's Performance On 3, beginning at 1930 1700-1900 *KGOU Changing World: Inside the Global Giants: BBC World Service has gained unprecedented access to some of the world's biggest companies in this 2-hour special: oil titans Shell, clothing company Levi, electronics manufacturer Solectron and controversial Russian company Gasprom. In a series of location reports, Lesley Curwen examines the way these businesses behave and the impact they have on the communities where their operations are based 1745-1830 *BBCR3 Sunday Feature: Our Man In Berlin: In September last year, Simon Rattle took over as music director of the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra. Richard Morrison charts his first months in charge of one of the world's finest orchestras. The Philharmonic is steeped in the tradition of Karajan, but with Simon Rattle the orchestra is going through a revolution. Over six months in Berlin, Rattle introduces new repertoire by Thomas Ades, takes a different look at standard repertoire of Mahler and Stravinsky, starts an ambitious education programme, working towards creating an orchestra for the 21st century 1800-1900 *WKNO SMART CITY: Who Influences What Happens in Communities? Jon Berry, co-author of the book, "The Influentials: One American in Ten Tells the Other Nine How to Vote, Where to Eat, and What to Buy," and Joseph Hughey, associate professor of psychology at the University of Missouri - Kansas City 1900-2000 *WILL MEDIA MATTERS: Hollywood progressives on the movie business. Director and Producer Robert Greenwald and actor Mike Farrell are guests 2000-2100 *KBYU KBYU-FM SPECIAL PRESENTATION: Songs of the Irish Poets: Music of the masters inspired by Irish poets with commentary and readings by guest Leslie Norris 2100-2200 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: comedian Steve Martin 2130-2200 *BBCR4 Analysis: Strange Bedfellows: 30 years after the sexual revolution, Margaret Doyle asks why we are still so keen to invite the state to interfere in our private relationships 2200-2230 *KQED NPR News: Possible Bush Press Conference from the Azores: President Bush will hold a summit with the leaders of Britain and Spain on efforts to win United Nations support for war against Iraq. At this time the President has scheduled a press conference from the Azores. NPR News will offer live, anchored coverage of the event, hosted by Neal Conan. (recorded live from noon PST) 2230-2300 *KQED On the Media: (Join in Progress?) We consider what happened at the President's last news conference, what didn't happen, and why. Also the balking hawks: pundits who reluctantly supported War in Iraq are now reluctantly against it. And, a TV expert tells us what he did for money 2300-2400 *WBEZ The Whole Wide World: Part one of a seven-part series decoding the riddles of globalism. 2300-2400 *WGBH The Whole Wide World with Christopher Lydon, Part 1 looks at the global condition UT MON MARCH 17 MONDAYS Australia Canberra Day (ACT only) Bangladesh Birthday of Bagabethu Sheikh Mujibur Rahman Ireland, Montserrat St Patrick's Day 0000-0100 *CAINAN Sounds Irish 2003 0000-0100 *WBEZ Castles of Gold: Songs and Stories of Irish Immigration 0015-0045 *BBCR4 Opening Nights: Oliver: Russell Davies looks at the stories behind the opening nights of well known musicals. Undoubtedly one of the best loved musicals of all time. Based on the Charles Dickens' story, Lional Bart introduced this musical version of Oliver's story on the stage of the New Theatre, London in June 1960. With contributions from Ron Moody and Tony Robinson we find out the secret of its success. Followed by Bells 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILE: Giorgio Tozzi 0100-0200 *WFIU ON THE AISLE: Delving into minds of screenwriters 0100-0200 *WBEZ Architecture Special: Planning for Chicago's Future: Chicago Public Radio's Edward Lifson hosts this live call-in special. Guests include: Ned Cramer, Curator, Chicago Architecture Foundation; Ralph Johnson, FAIA, Principal, Perkins and Will; Linda Searl, FAIA, Principal, Searl and Associates; Brad Lynch, Principal, Brininstool + Lynch. Call in during the show at 312.832.3431 0100-0200 *CAINAN Whole Wide World with Christopher Lydon 0200-0300 *CAINAN Stories of Her 0200-0300 *WBEZ On Iraq's Borders: Inside Out: a look at the impact a war will likely have on the neighbors of Iraq who are closest to the U.S.: Turkey and Jordan 0200-0300 *WFIU SOUNDS IRISH 2003 0200-0400 tvSCI CHILDREN OF DUNE 1 of 3 [+2/4 hours +following nights] 0300-0400 *CAINAN Alternative Radio: Amy Goodman - Independent Media in a Time of War 0500-0600 *WYSO War Without End: A Humankind Special Report: This probing look at war examines the human and material costs of armed conflict. It asks what it means for soldiers – and for their targets – to drop a bomb or fire high-powered weapons of destruction. It considers soldiers' values and beliefs, and examines how a military turns ordinary citizens into fighters. The program also looks at how media portrayals of war compare with the real experience [NOT: instead, Frank Stanton memoirs!] 0500-0600 *WBEZ Performance Space: Buena Vista bassist Cachaito Lopez and Olu Dara 0600-0700 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Ross King about the technology of Michelangelo's famous fresco, which is the ceiling of the Sistine Chapel. They also take a look at how Michelangelo designed and built the dome of St. Peter's Basilica. Moira will also speak with former Scientific American staffer John Horgan. They'll look at what modern science can tell us about our spiritual experiences 1400-1540 *BBCR3 BBC Orchestras: BBC Scottish Symphony Orchestra: An element of folk music runs through this week's programmes, each day representing a different part of the world. Today, music from the New World includes Copland's obscure ballet, Hear ye, hear ye, a satirical look at the American court system and one of the composer`s earliest excursions into American pop-folk idioms. Presented by Sarah Walker. Also: MacDowell: Piano Concerto no. 2 in D minor (Op. 23); Dvorak: Symphony no. 9 in E minor (Op. 95) "From the New World" 1406-1500 *WMUB Interconnect with John Hingsbergen and Cheri Lawson: Fairy Stories of Hidden Ireland. Guest: Storyteller Eddie Lenihan 1505-1530 *BBCWa One Planet: Living On The Edge: Euan McIlwraith travels to the islands of the South Pacific to investigate the enormous environmental pressures which now face them. He also looks at how the individual small communities there are launching innovative projects to meet the challenge 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: France's New de Gaulle. Chirac attaque. France's conservative populist president is suddenly popular again. But will Europe's most stubborn opponent to a US-led war with Iraq enjoy a political comeback or comeuppance? [repeat at 0206, 0306] 1530-1600 *BBCWa Return To Vietnam: Lucy Duran presents two programmes from Vietnam, joined by musician Tran Quang Hai who makes the long journey home for the first time after 41 years of exile in Paris. They sample a variety of musical events and performances from around the country 1600-1630 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Andrew Jefford raises his glass to traditional British beers and wonders why our national drink has yet to capture the gourmet imagination 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: Edward Seckerson plays excerpts from musicals that explore the themes of chivalry and derring-do, including Camelot, Man of La Mancha and The Three Musketeers 1600-1700 *WUOT SPECIAL: Sounds Irish 2003 1606-1700 *WOIa Talk of Iowa: Iowa State University Assistant Professor Alex Tuckness has accepted a Harvard Faculty Fellowship in Ethics at Harvard University's Center for Ethics and the Professions, to work on his next book project, "Principles of International Justice." The new book will look at contemporary ethical issues and decisions nations must make, such as when one nation should intervene in another's internal politics or policies based on moral or ethical reasons, why such action is or isn't permissible, and when a nation should be obligated to intervene 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: Conflict and Character. In the second hour, a five-part series on Presidential leadership. We examine how Presidents Washington, Lincoln, Wilson, FDR, and Johnson made war, fashioned peace, and shaped the nation. This hour, George Washington, first President of the Republic [repeat at 0406] 1806-1900 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: As we're hearing from Captain Steph's Life on the Bay this week (see site for air times), the seafood watchlist is getting bigger every year. What else can we as consumers do to insure an abundant supply of healthy seafood and sealife? John Sandidge talks with Shelly Benoit, cofounder of Sustainable Fishery Advocates, and Sarah Miles of New Leaf Community Markets, which has partnered with SFA to make sustainable seafood easy to find. Also: this weekend saw another round of peace marches around the US. Call in to the show at 831- 476-2800 or 1-800-655-5877 to join a discussion about peace marches. Are they useful beyond being a feel-good measure for people against the war? Are peace marches under-covered in the media? Should the media cover pro-war marches, too? And Assemblyman John Laird finishes the show with his Sacramento Report. A budget has been passed! 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: George Arney investigates Ukraine's coal mining industry. Since independence, the country's pits have degenerated into death traps, and the miners are dying. 2100-2130 *BBCR4 Shrinking Violets: Kerry Ten Kate casts an eye over The New Atlas of the British and Irish Flora, the first comprehensive audit of Britain's plant species for forty years 2100-2200 *BBCR2 Live From The Stables: Following on from the huge success of the last series, BBC Radio 2 presents one of the finest big bands in the world with guest appearances from the best known names in Jazz and completely original cross-over performances from some of the highest profile players in Pop. The series is under-pinned by performance and presentation from the Godmother and Godfather of British swing, Dame Cleo Lane and John Dankworth. In tonight's programme, Alison Moyet performs material from her new highly acclaimed album Home Time and a wonderful interpretation of The Man That Got Away. One of the best jazz guitarists in the world, John Ethridge performs in solo and with the band demonstrating his own inimitable style to great effect. He is joined on stage by the legendary Police guitarist, Andy Summers who flew in from Los Angeles especially to take part and performs an acoustic duet with John Etheridge as a taster for a full appearance later in the series. Jazz newcomer Clare Teal treats the audience to a version of I Get A Kick Out Of You 2306-2400 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: In her fifth Great Decisions program, Kathleen Dunn and her guest discuss the current relationship between the United States and China. Guest: John L. Holden, President, National Committee on U.S.-China Relations 2330-2400 *RFPI TUC RADIO: The Execution of Martin Luther King, A talk by Dr. William Pepper (Black History Month Special). More secrecy surrounds the murder of Martin Luther King than even that of the Kennedy's. Most people still believe that James Earl Ray, who never even had a trial, was the lone assassin. Dr. William Pepper, who became Ray's lawyer, has uncovered evidence of the involvement of the Memphis police department, the US government and even the US Army in a plot to kill one of the most influential leaders of the 20th century. His book: An Act of State, The Execution of Martin Luther King represents a quarter century of detective and legal work. [+6/12 hours] +7445 and/or 15039 UT TUE MARCH 18 TUESDAYS Aruba National Anthem & Flag Day Comoros Anniversary of Death of Pres. Said Mohammed Sheikh Hinduism Holi / Holika / Medin Poya/Dola Purnima Israel (Jewish) Purim; Myanmar Full Moon of Tabaung St. Cyril 0000-0200 tvSCI CHILDREN OF DUNE 1 of 3 0006-0100 *WMUB INTERCONNECT: with John Hingsbergen and Cheri Lawson: Fairy Stories of Hidden Ireland. Guest: Storyteller Eddie Lenihan 0100-xxxx ACTING PRESIDENTIAL ADDRESS TO THE NATION pre-empts lots of stuff 0100-0200 *KGOU Castles of Gold: Songs & Stories of Irish Immigration: invites listeners to spend a captivating hour hearing songs and stories that explore the joys and sorrows of Irish emigration. Two prominent Irish Americans are the storytellers: Pulitzer Prize-winning writer Frank McCourt, author of Angela's Ashes and 'Tis, and Roma Downey, star of the popular TV series Touched by an Angel 0100-0300 tvPBS FRONTLINE SPECIAL: The Long Road to War [ET/CT; check] 0100-0400 tvABC SPECIAL: When Diplomacy Fails 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: Guinness is Good For You! The black brew with the thick, creamy top was created by Arthur Guinness in 1759. Paul Kennedy celebrates the history and mythology of Guinness, from its humble Dublin origins to its current status as one of the most successful brand names anywhere [+1/2/3/4/h] 0200-0400 tvSCI CHILDREN OF DUNE 2 of 3 [+2/4 hours and next night] 0206-0300 *MichR The Connection: Chirac attaque. France's conservative populist president is suddenly popular again. But will Europe's most stubborn opponent to a US-led war with Iraq enjoy a political comeback or comeuppance? 0300-0400 tvPBS NOW WITH BILL MOYERS SPECIAL: What`s Next for Iraq [ET/CT original timing; check local listings] 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: France's New de Gaulle. Chirac attaque. France's conservative populist president is suddenly popular again. But will Europe's most stubborn opponent to a US-led war with Iraq enjoy a political comeback or comeuppance? 0306-0400 *WHYY JUSTICE TALKING: A-O-L, Time-Warner, Disney, Clear Channel. Media companies keep growing bigger and more powerful. And now, the F-C-C is reviewing its rules over broadcast ownership. Should there be a limit to the number of T-V or radio stations one company can own in your town? Or are these regulations out of step with the new information economy? Join Margot Adler for a debate on media consolidation and the public interest 0310-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: TBA, but always worth checking 0400-0500 *KQED World Affairs Council: "The Stakes: America and the Middle East." Tonight's speaker is Shibley Telhami, Anwar Sadat Professor for Peace and Development at the University of Maryland and senior fellow at the Saban Center of the Brookings Institution. In his new book, Telhami provides a penetrating analysis of Arab and Muslim attitudes toward U.S. foreign policy and shows thy there is much reason for concern. He explains why the Arab-Israeli conflict remains central to both the war on terrorism and to international stability, and suggests how best to achieve political change in the region 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: Conflict and Character. In the second hour of the Connection, a five-part series on Presidential leadership. We examine how Presidents Washington, Lincoln, Wilson, FDR, and Johnson made war, fashioned peace, and shaped the nation. This hour, George Washington, first President of the Republic 0406-0500 *WHYY THE CONNECTION: Conflict and character: a five-part series on Presidential leadership. Examining how Presidents Washington, Lincoln, Wilson, FDR, and Johnson made war, fashioned peace, and shaped the nation. This hour, George Washington, first president of the Republic 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: the Presidential series on leadership in crisis continues. In part two, the Connection examines conlict and character in Abraham Lincoln [repeat at 0406] 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: The Turbulent History of a Divided Continent. Guest: William I. Hitchcock: Prof. Modern European History, Wellesley College. In his new book, THE STRUGGLE FOR EUROPE, Professor Hitchcock examines historic impacts on Europe and ho it now stands on the threshold of political and economic change that will profoundly shape world affairs % 1745-XXXX *WPRi Jim Packard in for Larry Meiller: The Northern Lights are one of nature's most fascinating optical displays. After eleven-forty five, Jim Packard talks with an award-winning photographer who is fascinated with the Aurora Borealis. Duane Clausen, Menominee, MI 1800-1900 *KUNI Transforming Iowa's Economy: KUNI will offer a keynote address from the recent Iowa Creative Economy Summit held by the Iowa Department of Cultural Affairs in Des Moines. Best- selling author and professor Richard Florida speaks on "Transforming Iowa's Economy: The Creative Catalyst." 1900-2200 *BBCR2 various music series; see DAY 2000-2040 *BBCR4 Pentagon Power: America spends more on its military than the next ten biggest militaries in the world combined. But Allan Little argues that far from having imperialist ambitions, the awesome USA forces of today have evolved against all the nation's instincts, traditions and history. America is the reluctant superpower. [Rptd Sun 1700] 2006-2100 *WHYY FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: Queen Noor of Jordan, the American born fourth wife the late King Hussein, will talk about the relationship between the Arab World and the West, and her own relationship to Islam and the Middle East. Her new memoir is called Leap of Faith. (Repeated at 0000) [Maybe: other stations preview novelist Scott Spencer; or both??][NO: neither; a pro-, anti-war discussion] 2030-2100 *BBCWe Omnibus: Global Perspective: How different countries respond to the challenges and problems of immigrants and refugees 2030-2130 *BBCR2 Caine At 70: Barry Norman presents an in-depth profile of Sir Michael Caine to mark his 70th birthday this March. Caine gives a rare and candid interview for the two part series about his life and long career in films. He will be hoping to crown that career by winning a Best Actor award for his role in The Quiet American at this year's Oscar ceremony on March 20th. He talks about his poor background, his hatred of Britain's class system and his determination to become a successful actor. Caine explains why he thinks he has become an iconic figure: the glasses, the catchphrases and why he does not mind being impersonated. He talks about the women in his life and what attracted him to his wife of thirty years, Shakira. Caine also speaks openly about David, his half-brother who spent his whole life in mental institutions, and how their mother took the sixty-year secret of his existence to her grave. Programme One: Caine's early life and how he became an icon of the 1960s in films such as The Ipcress File, Alfie and The Italian Job. Roger Moore exclusively reveals that he was offered Caine's part in Zulu but turned it down, something he has never discussed with Caine in their forty-year friendship 2130-2200 *BBCR2 Modern Jazz Classics: Brandford Marsalis details the stories behind six key modern jazz albums. Tonight, Saxophonist Wayne Shorter's 1964 Blue Note masterwork, recorded with Ron Carter, Herbie Hancock, Freddie Hubbard and Elvin Jones UT WED MARCH 19 WEDNESDAYS Catholic St Joseph's Day Hinduism Holi or Holika (second day) Hinduism Guru Ravi Das Jayanti Spain (Valencia) Falles 0000-0200 tvSCI CHILDREN OF DUNE 2 of 3 0006-0100 *WHYY FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: Queen Noor of Jordan, the American born fourth wife the late King Hussein, will talk about the relationship between the Arab World and the West, and her own relationship to Islam and the Middle East. Her new memoir is called Leap of Faith [Maybe: other stations preview novelist Scott Spencer; or both??] [NO: at 2006 a pro-, anti-war discussion instead!] 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: Saddam Hussein - Living with a Dictator: Iraqi exile Entifadh Qanbar was jailed for 47 days after being accused of political activities. He talks with Paul Kennedy about Saddam's reign of terror [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 *MichR Todd Mundt: The saga and meaning of the Dead Sea Scrolls 0200-0400 tvSCI CHILDREN OF DUNE 3 of 3 [+2/4 hours, tomorrow] 0200-0530 tvPBS Domestic Violence: Filmed in Tampa, Florida, this two-part film by cinema-verite master Frederick Wiseman shows the police responding to domestic violence calls, the work of The Spring, the principal shelter in Tampa for women and children, and the judicial proceedings connected with domestic violence. The first episode shows police response, intervention and attempted resolution, as well as life for women and children at the shelter [original ET/CT airing; check listings] Part 2 tomorrow at 0200-0500 (CC, Stereo) 0230-0300 *BBCWS Omnibus: Global Perspective: How different countries respond to the challenges and problems of immigrants and refugees 0305-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: Sherlock Holmes, allegedly, but this topic already aired last week on a TBA 0400-0500 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: comedian Steve Martin 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: Presidential series on leadership in crisis continues. In part two, the Connection examines conlict and character in Abraham Lincoln 1230-1300 *RN DOCUMENTARY: "Looking for Terrorists" Produced & presented by David Swatling: An Israeli woman tracks down the man who shot her in a terrorist attack twenty-three years ago, and works for his release from prison. A young Polish woman travels to Algeria to look for terrorists, and falls in love with her Algerian guide. These two unique stories have something in common. Both women filmed their journeys. The films "My Terrorist" and "The Nameless War" were two of the highlights of the International Documentary Filmfestival Amsterdam in December. The subject of terrorism has become more immediate than when the directors first began working on their projects. They share their stories with David Swatling in our documentary "Looking for Terrorists." [+ many repeats; see DAY] +5965 1500-1530 *RN DOCUMENTARY: "Looking for Terrorists" Produced & presented by David Swatling: An Israeli woman tracks down the man who shot her in a terrorist attack twenty-three years ago, and works for his release from prison. A young Polish woman travels to Algeria to look for terrorists, and falls in love with her Algerian guide. These two unique stories have something in common. Both women filmed their journeys. The films "My Terrorist" and "The Nameless War" were two of the highlights of the International Documentary Filmfestival Amsterdam in December. The subject of terrorism has become more immediate than when the directors first began working on their projects. They share their stories with David Swatling in our documentary "Looking for Terrorists." [+ many repeats; see DAY] +15220 1530-1600 *KUNM Bioneers, "Getting the Real Story: Bypassing Corporate Media." The rise of new communications technologies capable of linking us as never before coincides with an unprecedented bid by the corporate media to monopolize the message. How can media be used to catalyze a national and global conversation about what really matters? Peter Montague, editor of "Rachel's Environment and Health News," Mark Sommer, Executive Director of the Mainstream Media Project, Elise Hoeg of the Rainforest Action Network, and Dan Merkle, cofounder of the Independent Media Center, describe strategies that are working 1530-1600 *BBCWe Omnibus: Global Perspective: How different countries respond to the challenges and problems of immigrants and refugees 1600-1630 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed: Laurie Taylor travels modern day Silk Routes in search of the immigrant entrepreneurs who sustain the Rag Trade, one of the world's largest industries 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: Part three of the series on Presidential leadership in times of crisis. The Connection examines Woodrow Wilson. He sought peace without victory in the war to end all wars, but he still couldn't make the world safe for democracy [repeat at 0406] 1630-1700 *BBCR4 All In The Mind: Dr Raj Persaud looks at research into the nature of the trauma suffered by patients in intensive care units. New evidence suggests that this is psychological as well as physical 1706-1800 *K57 JIM BOHANNON: Michael Bohn, ``Nerve Center`` about the White House situation room 1806-1900 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: You have a loved one in the military who has been sent to serve in the Gulf, or who may be called in as a reservist. You are a peace activist who is unsure if your efforts are bearing any fruit. You are a news junkie or politico frustrated by the way some faction in government is conducting their business. As the Bush Administration's threat to attack Iraq reaches a higher pitch, many of us find our stress level going up, but we may not have linked the stress to international events. Rachel Anne Goodman speaks with a panel of psychologists and counselors about this hidden, society-wide stress, and how to handle it. Panelists include mediation and conflict resolution specialist Dr. Donald Saposnek; psychologist Dr Sheila Coonerty; and ; Reverend Doctor Katherine O'Connell. Call in to the panel with your questions and comments at 831-476-2800 or 1-800-655-5877 1906-2000 *NPR Talk of the Nation: War and the balance between loyalty and dissent. For many who oppose a US led war in Iraq, dissent is the truest form of patriotism. And the closer we get to war, the louder their protest % 1930-2400 *BBCR3 A Place Called England: Fiona Talkington presents an evening exploring the state of English folk and traditional music live from the BBC's Birmingham studios. DETAILS 2005-2030 *BBCWe Discovery: Made For Life: Gabrielle Walker looks at the Earth, and discovers how and why it sustains life 2006-2100 *NPR Talk of the Nation: President Bush says the fall of Saddam Hussein will free Iraqis, and lead the way to democracy. Others worry about violence and retribution among political, ethnic and religious factions. Join Talk of the Nation after two for a look at the divisions within Iraq 2030-2100 *BBCWe Sports International: The Nation: How sport can divide as well as unite a nation and can be used by a government to enhance its reputation 2100-2130 *BBCR4 Behind The Superficial: Searching For The Dudley Bug: Mark Stephen discovers that a popular urban park is also a derelict limestone quarry, crammed with fossils dating back as much as 400 million years 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Guest explores the challenges facing public lands, and the way those challenges can be met. Michael P. Dombeck, Pioneer Professor of Global Environmental Management at the University of Wisconsin at Stevens Point, and co-author of "From Conquest to Conservation" (Island Press) 2200-2230 *BBCR2 Masters Of Rock: Bruce Dickinson presents the final part of Radio 2's look back at the history of hard rock. This year it's 1982 and Ozzy Osbourne makes the surprise comeback of the year, bites the head off a dove and loses his amazing young guitarist Randy Rhoads in a freak accident. Judas Priest explode in the USA, as do young upstarts Motley Crue. Aerosmith appear to be on their last legs and Bruce Dickinson makes his debut with Iron Maiden, and the album, The Number Of The Beast, is an instant classic 2300-2400 *RFPI ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Noam Chomsky about U.S. Grand Strategy: Global Rule by Force: The New Imperial World Order is officially under way. The National Security Strategy document lays it all out. Bush has told the world, It's our way or the highway. The US reserves the right to attack anyone at any time. Like the empires of old, the US clothes its aggressive intentions in the name of peace. America is innocent and a victim. But, "If war is forced upon us" as Bush said in his State of the Union speech, then America will fight. Despite high levels of pro-war propaganda, there is a rising tide of resistance to US hegemony. "Protests in the US and elsewhere are at levels that have no historical precedent," says Noam Chomsky. Noam Chomsky, MIT professor, in addition to being a pioneer in linguistics, is internationally renowned for his scholarship and activism on media issues, human rights and social justice [+6/12 hours] +15038 and/or 7445 UT THU MARCH 20 THURSDAYS Tunisia National Day Iran Oil Nationalization day ***EXPECT LOTS OF PRE-EMPTIONS FOR WAR COVERAGE*** 0000-0200 tvSCI CHILDREN OF DUNE 3 of 3 [all 3 repeated Sun 2200-0400 Mon] 0030-0100 *RN DOCUMENTARY: "Looking for Terrorists" Produced & presented by David Swatling: An Israeli woman tracks down the man who shot her in a terrorist attack twenty-three years ago, and works for his release from prison. A young Polish woman travels to Algeria to look for terrorists, and falls in love with her Algerian guide. These two unique stories have something in common. Both women filmed their journeys. The films "My Terrorist" and "The Nameless War" were two of the highlights of the International Documentary Filmfestival Amsterdam in December. The subject of terrorism has become more immediate than when the directors first began working on their projects. They share their stories with David Swatling in our documentary "Looking for Terrorists." [+ many repeats; see DAY] +6165 9845 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: First published in 1605, Don Quixote is the story of a man driven mad by books, a self-appointed knight-errant and his adventures on the back roads of Spain. Centuries later, it is considered by many as the greatest novel of all time. Barbara Nichol seeks out the foremost scholars who devote themselves to Cervantes and his book. Tune in for the conclusion of Don Quixote [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-XXXX *KUNM Philip Levine and Kate Daniels. Join us for another live broadcast from the Lensic Theatre in Santa Fe and the Lannan Foundation's Readings and Conversations series. Philip Levine won the 1995 Pulitzer Prize for Poetry and writes in a narrative lyric mode that is uniquely his own. Levine will read from his work, and then hold a conversation with Kate Daniels, a professor of poetry at Vanderbilt University. Daniels has published three volumes of poetry and is completing a fourth, "My Poverty." Among her awards are the Crazyhorse Poetry Prize, a Pushcart Prize and the Louisiana Poetry Prize [NOT! Blues Show airs as usual without apology or explanation!] 0200-0400 *AM640 SINTONIA DX 11th anniversary special [3-045], new webcast: http://intranet.unionradio.com.ve/intranet/Default.htm 0200-0500 tvPBS Domestic Violence: Filmed in Tampa, Florida, this two-part film by cinema-verite master Frederick Wiseman shows the police responding to domestic violence calls, the work of The Spring, the principal shelter in Tampa for women and children, and the judicial proceedings connected with domestic violence. The second episode explores the legal proceedings surrounding domestic violence. (CC, Stereo) [original ET/CT airing; check listings] 0205-0230 *BBCWS Discovery: Made For Life: Gabrielle Walker looks at the Earth, and discovers how and why it sustains life 0230-0300 *BBCWS Sports International: The Nation: How sport can divide as well as unite a nation and can be used by a government to enhance its reputation 0300-0330 tvCOM SOUTH PARK new 7-week season starts; numerous repeats 0305-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: TBA but always worth checking 0315-xxxx ACTING PRESIDENTIAL WAR ANNOUNCEMENT TO THE NATION 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: Voices of Public Intellectuals: Women and the Law: "The Asymmetry of Citizenship." Tonight's speaker is Linda Kerber from the University of Iowa. The language of equality in American law and tradition is wholesomely generic, but the practices of citizenship have not always been practices of equality. Kerber examines some of the ways in which the meanings of citizenship have been, and continue to be, different for men and for women 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: Part three of the series on Presidential leadership in times of crisis. The Connection examines Woodrow Wilson. He sought peace without victory in the war to end all wars, but he still couldn't make the world safe for democracy 0435-0537 tvCBS LATE SHOW WITHOUT DAVID LETTERMAN with Bonnie Hunt, sub [ET/CT airing; +1/3 hours, or locally delayed] 0500-0530 *RN DOCUMENTARY: "Looking for Terrorists" Produced & presented by David Swatling: An Israeli woman tracks down the man who shot her in a terrorist attack twenty-three years ago, and works for his release from prison. A young Polish woman travels to Algeria to look for terrorists, and falls in love with her Algerian guide. These two unique stories have something in common. Both women filmed their journeys. The films "My Terrorist" and "The Nameless War" were two of the highlights of the International Documentary Filmfestival Amsterdam in December. The subject of terrorism has become more immediate than when the directors first began working on their projects. They share their stories with David Swatling in our documentary "Looking for Terrorists." [+ many repeats; see DAY] +6165 9590 1530-1600 *BBCWa Omnibus: Global Perspective A series of programmes selected from broadcasters around the world in which each gives an insight into the way their country responds to global challenges. This series focuses on immigrants and refugees 1530-1600 *BBCWe Sports International: The Nation: Alex Capstick investigates how sport can divide, as well as unite, a nation and can be used by a government to enhance its reputation 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Music Restored: Purcell And The Theatre: Despite being one of the most important and active composers in the employ of the Royal Household, Henry Purcell also composed music for England's Restoration theatre. As Lucie Skeaping explains, some of Purcell's finest songs were composed for the playhouse. 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: The conflict and character of a president who led the nation to victory in World War ll. In part four of a series on Presidential leadership in times of crisis, we look at Franklin Delano Roosevelt [repeat at 0406] 1630-1700 *BBCR4 The Material World: To celebrate the first day of Spring on 21st March Quentin Cooper meets the researchers from the UK Phenology Network who survey the seasonal events of the year 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Children Soldiers: Guests: Peter W. Singer, Brookings Institution; Jo Becker, Children's Rights Div., Human Rights Watch. There are approximately 300.000 children, both boys and girls, under the age of 18, presently serving as combatants around the globe. Sadam Hussein has been conducting "boot camps" during the summer for children as young as 10 years old. Our guests will discuss the worldwide use of children as soldiers % 1710-1800 *WCPN Around Noon: "Cleveland International Film Festival Preview" --- Dee helps kick off the 27th Annual Cleveland International Film Festival. Meet principals from the festival's opening night film, American Splendor, based on the comic book by local writer Harvey Pekar. Dee also connects with local filmmakers whose movies have been selected to screen this year 1930-2130 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: The charismatic pianist Mitsuko Uchida recorded in her sell-out recital last week at the Royal Festival Hall in London. Schoenberg: 3 Pieces (Op.11); Schubert: Piano Sonata in G major (D. 894); Schumann: Fantasy in C (Op. 17). 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Rasta History: In the second of two programmes, Benjamin Zephaniah examines the Rastafarian dream of returning to Africa from the Caribbean. What does Africa mean to today's Rastas? 2005-2030 *BBCWe One Planet: The Nature Of Islands: Island life offers unique insights into evolution and extinction. The first of two programmes explores the eco systems of islands. This week: The Galapagos Islands, the inspiration for Charles Darwin 2030-2100 *BBCWe Return To Vietnam: Lucy Duran presents two programmes from Vietnam. She's joined by musician Tran Quang Hai who makes a long journey home after 41 years of exile in Paris, as they sample a variety of musical events 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Analysis: Neurotic Nation: More of us are turning to counselling or chemical fixes for our unhappiness. Felipe Fernández-Armesto investigates UT FRI MARCH 21 FRIDAYS Zoroastrian Noruz Japan Start of Spring - Vernal Equinox (Shumbun no hi) Shinto; Namibia Independence Day Malaysia Sultan Installation's Anniversary (Terengganu only) Catholic St Benedict Friday; Syria Mothers Day South Africa Human Rights Day; Tunisia Youth Day Mexico Birthday of Benito Juarez ***EXPECT LOTS OF PRE-EMPTIONS FOR WAR COVERAGE*** 0030-0230 *WQXR New York Philharmonic Live! Rostropovich and Argerich: Two greats, Mstislav Rostropovich on the podium, and Martha Argerich at the piano, are the stars of this live concert broadcast, to feature Berstein's Slava! (A Political Overture), Prokofiev's Piano Concerto No. 3 with Argerich, Dutilleux's Timbres, espace, mouvement, and Lutoslawski's Concerto for Orchestra 0100-0200 *WCPN Voices of Public Intellectuals: Women and the Law: "Battered Women and Feminist Lawmaking" As recently as the 1960s, the harm of domestic violence was not legally recognized. Elizabeth Schneider discusses how trailblazing feminist activists and lawyers have brought the severity of domestic violence to public attention and have led Congress, the Supreme Court, and the United Nations to address the problem since then 0100-0300 *WUOT SPECIAL: Instrumental Women: On Record 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Ideas: Updrafts. You just had a car accident. You've been brain injured. What would you remember? How would you perceive? Playwright A. G. Boss takes you inside his brain injury and recovery 0205-0230 *BBCWS One Planet: The Nature Of Islands: Island life offers unique insights into evolution and extinction. The first of two programmes explores the eco systems of islands. This week: The Galapagos Islands, the inspiration for Charles Darwin 0230-0300 *BBCWS Return To Vietnam: Lucy Duran presents two programmes from Vietnam. She's joined by musician Tran Quang Hai who makes a long journey home after 41 years of exile in Paris, as they sample a variety of musical events 0305-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: TBA but always worth checking 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: She Got Game: This special program is dedicated exclusively to thoughtful coverage and analysis of women's sports 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: Examines the conflict and character of a president who led the nation to victory in World War ll. In part four of a series on Presidential leadership in times of crisis, we look at Franklin Delano Roosevelt 1530-1600 *BBCWa Sports International: The Nation Alex Capstick investigates the different ways sport can affect a nation. While there are many examples of how sport can unite a nation, its divisive qualities are just as potent and sometimes destructive 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: Carlos Eire: Waiting for Snow in Havana (Free Press) Diane's live broadcast from National Geographic continues. History professor Carlos Eire talks about growing up in a world that no longer exists. His memoirs Waiting for Snow in Havana, recounts his wealthy, eccentric Havana family, which he left behind at 12 as one of the 14,000 children airlifted to Miami in "Operation Pedro Pan." [NOT: removed later] 1710-1800 *WCPN Around Noon: "Oscar Preview Call-in Show": Dee's popular Oscar call-in show returns as she opens the phones and invites listeners to vote for their favorite films of the past year. Share your pans and praises with Dee and her panel of film buffs, who'll discuss which films and actors are favored to take home the Academy Awards at this year's ceremony 2105-2130 *BBCWa One Planet: The Nature Of Islands: Island life offers unique insights into evolution and extinction. In the first of two programmes, we explore the eco systems of islands. This week: The Galapagos Islands, inspiration for Charles Darwin 2130-2200 *BBCWa Return To Vietnam: Lucy Duran presents two programmes from Vietnam, joined by musician Tran Quang Hai who makes the long journey home for the first time after 41 years of exile in Paris. They sample a variety of musical events and performances from around the country UT SAT MARCH 22 SATURDAYS Laos People's Party Day Puerto Rico Emancipation Day Syria Arab League's Day; St. Lea 0000-0200 WWBS check 11900 in wake of death of Charles Josey [3-045; +Sun] 0305-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE MILTIES : It's Oscar time once again. Who's in line to carry home the coveted gold statue? Are there any lasting gems in the bunch that may, for a change, attain some sort of legendary status? And what was overlooked last year? Our traditional panel of PENELOPE MESIC, GENE PHILLIPS, and JOSH LARSEN will cut through the overblown Hollywood hype to reveal the true classics (if any) from 2002 1200-1300 *KUNI The Memoirs of Frank Stanton: One of Broadcast Journalism's Best, in His Own Words. Narrated by CBS 60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace, The Memoirs of Frank Stanton features Stanton's remembrances of his life and career, as told to the Oral History Department of Columbia University in a series of interviews spanning 10 years. Stanton - who has been called the conscience of broadcasting and the greatest broadcast executive of all time - was also a confidante of U.S. presidents from Harry S Truman to Lyndon B. Johnson. He was the driving force behind the formulation of televised debates between presidential candidates, starting with the Kennedy-Nixon debates of 1960. Stanton made his greatest mark on the broadcasting field when he refused a Congressional subpoena to release non-air notes and tapes relating to the 1973 CBS Reports documentary, The Selling of the Pentagon. The ensuing vote by the U.S. House to hold Stanton in contempt of Congress - and Stanton s victory - helped lay the groundwork for the Constitutional protections broadcast journalists enjoy to the present day 2000-2100 *WLRN The Children of War: Fighting, Dying, Surviving: This documentary, hosted by Charlayne Hunter-Gault, will take you to the battlegrounds and refugee camps that shape the lives of millions of children around the globe. Hear about child soldiers, children fleeing conflict, and the physical and psychological rehabilitation of children touched by war UT SUN MARCH 23 SUNDAYS Pakistan Revolution Day Russian Federation referendum (Chechnya) Slovenia referendum Spain (Valenciana) Magdalena Festivities (Castellón only) 0000-0200 WWBS check 11900 in wake of death of Charles Josey [3-045] 0130-0230 *RFPI ALTERNATIVE RADIO: Noam Chomsky about U.S. Grand Strategy: Global Rule by Force: The New Imperial World Order is officially under way. The National Security Strategy document lays it all out. Bush has told the world, It's our way or the highway. The US reserves the right to attack anyone at any time. Like the empires of old, the US clothes its aggressive intentions in the name of peace. America is innocent and a victim. But, "If war is forced upon us" as Bush said in his State of the Union speech, then America will fight. Despite high levels of pro-war propaganda, there is a rising tide of resistance to US hegemony. "Protests in the US and elsewhere are at levels that have no historical precedent," says Noam Chomsky. Noam Chomsky, MIT professor, in addition to being a pioneer in linguistics, is internationally renowned for his scholarship and activism on media issues, human rights and social justice [+6/12 hours] +15038 and/or 7445 1800-1900 *KUNM Radio Theater, "Mars vs. New Mexico." David Landry wrote this satire, inspired by Orson Welles' 1938 production of "The War of the Worlds." Mr. Landry is one of the winners of KUNM's Radio Play Script Contest, which concluded in September. Marya Errin Jones directs a cast that includes Jay Brooks, Matt Hilligoss, Padraic Keohane, Laira Morgan, Joshua Narcisso, Patrick O'Connell, Linda Rodeck, Sabrielle Sky, and Henrique Valdovinos. Sound design by Mitch Rayes. Recorded live at the Outpost Performance Space in January by Nola Daves Moses, with the assistance of Brandon Kennedy and Daniel Monroe. Produced by Rachel Kaub for KUNM's Albuquerque Radio Theatre. Co-sponsored by the City of Albuquerque's Urban Enhancement Trust Fund and KUNM 2200-0400 tvSCI CHILDREN OF DUNE 1, 2 and 3 2300-2400 *WGBH The Whole Wide World — Part 2: Are we at war over ideas, resources, or civilizations? UT MON MARCH 24 MONDAYS Colombia San José New Zealand Otago Day (Otago only) Northern Mariana Islands Convenant Day St. Catherine of Sweden 0100-0200 *WFIU INSTRUMENTAL WOMEN: On Record 2100-2200 *OPB 2003 Voices of Public Intellectuals: Women and the Law: Exploring gender and the public and private rights of citizens through the lens of the law. Now in its fourth year, the Voices of Public Intellectuals lecture series defines issues affecting civic life. The language of equality in American law and tradition has not always translated to practices of equality. Women's rights continue to be different from men's. Addressing such topics as domestic violence, sexual harassment law, and citizenship issues, three invited scholars, lawyers, and historians explore, in accessible terms, gender and the public and private rights of citizens. Lectures and Speakers: Battered Women and Feminist Lawmaking: Elizabeth M. Schneider, Brooklyn Law School http://www.radcliffe.edu/vpi/ UT TUE MARCH 25 TUESDAYS 1900-2200 *BBCR2 various music series; see DAY note: after some down time, we resume updating here: UT WED MARCH 26 WEDNESDAYS Mali Martyrs' Day; Bangladesh Independence Day Virgin Islands Transfer Day; St. Ludger Hawaii Prince Jonah Kuhio Kalanianaole Day 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Global Village: All this week, Global Village will do a special night-time series looking at how war has been reflected, recorded and challenged, and the pain of war soothed, by artists living in conflict zones. Tonight, host Jowi Taylor has a look at the Baghdad Orchestra before the start of the current conflict, an Audio Postcard from a Kurdish exile living in Sweden, a profile of Somali-Canadian poet Kienaan and much more [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0105-0200 *CBCR1 Ideas: More About Henry. Billy goats and bulls. Square dances and harmonicas. Mechanization. Artificial insemination. Henry Haws' stories from a long life of farming were recorded by his grandson, Adam Goddard, and used to make this unusual and entertaining musical documentary [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: The Iraqi exile Kanan Makiya has a vision of a post-Saddam government that makes room for all opposing factions, clans and sects. The US sought his views, but will they listen? After ten, The Connection looks at the prospects for democracy in Iraq 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM: Roots of Islamic Radicalism: A panel talks about Islam, the Koran, and the modern thinkers and writers whose work heavily influences radical Islamic terrorists today. Paul Berman, author of Terror and Liberalism (W.W. Norton) and of "The Philosopher of Islamic Terror" in The New York Times Magazine, March 23, 2003; John Esposito, director of the Center for Muslim-Christian Understanding at the Walsh School of Foreign Service at Georgetown University and author of Unholy War: Terror in the Name of Islam (Oxford) % 1600-1630 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed: Ethnic minorities in rural Britain are small in number but conspicuous. Laurie Taylor investigates racism in country areas, and why specific measures may be needed to counteract it 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: Queen Noor: Leap of Faith: Memoirs of an Unexpected Life (Miramax). As the American-born wife of the late King Hussein of Jordan, Queen Noor has a unique perspective on events in the Middle East. In a new book, she shares memories of her 21-year marriage and her perspective on Hussein's legacy % 1630-1700 *BBCR4 All In The Mind: Cognitive Behavioural Therapy has become the treatment of choice for any number of psychological problems, from Post Traumatic Stress Disorder to Eating Disorders. Now it's even being used with patients with cancer and diabetes. Dr Raj Persaud meets Professor Aaron Beck, the creator of CBT, and hears what he thinks of the various directions his therapy has taken 1700-2000 *WFMU Joseph Lanza: on Irwin's show Author Joseph Lanza appears to discuss his new book "Russ Columbo and the Crooner Mystique," published by Feral House. The dashing, romantic Columbo, virtually forgotten for the last half-century, was as popular as Bing Crosby in the early 1930s and considered a heart-throb on a par with Rudolph Valentino. But at age 26, Columbo was shot and killed by his best friend in a freak accident, ending one of the most promising careers in music and film. Lanza will discuss the 1930s crooning vogue and Columbo's place in history, as well as feature his recordings 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Topic: Dirty Bombs. Guests: Dr. Charles Ferguson: Monterey Institute for International Studies Dr. Jonathan Links: Bloomberg School of Public Health, Johns Hopkins Univ. Conventional explosives such as dynamite become more deadly when placed in a container of radioactive materials to create a "dirty bomb." Our guests will discuss how serious this threat may be and what is being done about it to protect the public % 1706-1900 *KQED Radio Specials: California Reacts: A Special Statewide Call- In; A co-production of KPBS/KPCC & KQED. Tom Fudge, host of "These Days" at KPBS; Larry Mantle, host of "AirTalk" on KPCC and Michael Krasny, host of "Forum" on KQED take a look at how the war is affecting the economy and security of California, and the lives of Californians. Guests include: Amy Gaver, director of Community Preparedness Services of the American Red Cross, Bay Area Chapter; Steven Levy, director of the Center for the Continuing Study of the California Economy; and Lucian Canton, director of San Francisco Mayor's Office of Emergency Services 1806-1900 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Robert Weissman is one of dozens of journalists and others who signed an open letter to the major media. Dated March 4th, the letter criticized media coverage of Iraq disarmament and war preparations. Now that war is underway, host Rachel Ann Goodman asks Robert Weissman if any of the letter's critiques have been taken into account. In the second half of the show, call in with your questions and comments to 831-476-2800 or 1-800-655-5877 1806-1900 *WBEZ ODYSSEY: Ethical Considerations of Torture 1845-1930 *BBCR3 Lebrecht Live: Is a record real? Is a photograph art? Norman Lebrecht asks how far we can trust photographs and recordings as truly authentic. 'A fraud!' cried the conductor Otto Klemperer on seeing an Abbey Road engineer edit a bad note in his performance for release on record. Everyone knows that records lie. Even the so-called 'live recordings' have been put together from two or more performances. So can we trust a record to deliver musical truth, or must we hear everything live? And what about photographs? Those that qualify as works of art have been glossed, retouched, detached from reality. Art apart, can they be trusted as a record of the way we are, or were? The things we accept as a matter of record are rarely what they seem on first encounter. Do we need to reconsider the role of recording and photography in shaping our perceptions of art and reality? 2100-2130 *BBCR4 Behind The Superficial: The Sleeping Lion: Mark Stephen climbs the rocky hill overlooking Edinburgh. Following in the footsteps of James Hutton, the father of modern geology, he discovers a rich story 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Former Senator and Democratic Presidential Candidate George McGovern who is now Roving Ambassador for the UN World Food Program 2200-2230 *BBCR2 Without Frontiers: Charlie Gillett begins an eight-part series featuring music on a particular theme. Today, how time has been interpreted in song. Music comes from Leonard Cohen, Prince and Moloko 2206-2300 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: The United Nations has failed in its attempt to avoid war involving Iraq. The U.N. is hopelessly corrupt and should be disbanded – so says Kathleen Dunn's guest, Robert Tracinski (Tra-sin-skee) Sr. Fellow Ayn Rand Institute editor Intellectual Activist (monthly current events magazine) 2305-2400 *WQXR DRIVE TIME WITH NY PHILHARMONIC: March 26: "Slava and Friends, Part II" -- Britten, Prokofiev and Shostakovich - all composers that Mstislav Rostropovich knew and whose music he championed as cellist and conductor. "Dawn" from Britten's Four Sea Interludes from Peter Grimes, led by Kurt Masur (2000), an excerpt from Britten's Les Illuminations conducted by Sir Colin Davis and featuring tenor Ian Bostridge (2002), Prokofiev's Love for Three Oranges Suite, led by Valery Gergiev (1999), and the final movement of Shostakovich's Symphony No. 5, led by Kurt Masur (1998) comprise this program. UT THU MARCH 27 THURSDAYS Myanmar Armed Forces Day (Tatmadaw Day) Angola Victory Day; Blessed Pellegrino 0100-0300 *WHRB NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC ORCHESTRA Mstislav Rostropovich conducting. Bernstein: Slava!, A Political Overture; Prokofiev: Piano Concerto No. 3 in C, Op. 26; Martha Argerich; Dutilleux: Timbres, espace, mouvement; Lutoslawski: Concerto for Orchestra [NOT: show had not arrived (by CD?) Maybe UT Sun] {try KSUT at 0200, per DAY schedule) [really awful sounding stream dumped out promptly at 0200...] 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: "On the Homefront: Northern California." In times of war, communities respond. A collaborative series between KQED Public Radio, KQED Public Television 9, and KQED.org. This 10 part program seeks to provide a time and place for people of the Bay Area to pause and reflect on the human impact of war in our daily lives. Through a variety of perspectives, we will explore topics such as coping with fear, the role of spirituality, the definition of patriotism, the financial impact of war, how we can hold public officials accountable, and talking with our children about war. 0305-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE JUDGE'S ROLE: Around 430 BC, Socrates noted, "Four things belong to a judge: to hear courteously, to answer wisely, to consider soberly, and to decide impartially"--sound advice indeed. But in the enormously complex modern world, what additional (if any) roles does a judge have? Since the time of John Marshall, judicial activism has been an almost standard practice in the United States. Should it continue? Our guests tonight, Judge RICHARD POSNER of the 7th Circuit of the U.S. Court of Appeals and ANTHONY D'AMATO, a professor of law at Northwestern University, have some strong disagreements over the judge's role and will debate the issue in full. The amazingly prolific author Posner does have yet another book out that touches on a number of these issues: Law, Pragmatism, and Democracy 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: Voices of Public Intellectuals: Women and the Law (8pm, 2am): "Battered Women and Feminist Lawmaking." Tonight's speaker is Elizabeth M. Schneider from the Brooklyn Law School. As recently as the 1960s, the harm of domestic violence was not legally recognized. Schneider discusses how, since then, path-breaking feminist activists and lawyers have brought the severity of domestic violence to public attention and have led the U.S. Congress, the U.S. Supreme Court, and the United Nations to address the problem 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: British Prime Minister Tony Blair visits the U.S. to press his case for UN-led reconstruction in Iraq and the need to put the roadmap to Mideast peace back on the fast track. Testing the strength of the alliance...a special BBC simulcast 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Music Restored: Byrd And The Catholics: Lucie Skeaping and Andrew Carwood, on location at a Safe House in Essex, explore the undercover life of musicians on the Country House circuit at the time of Elizabeth I 1600-XXXX Bush/Blair News Conference may pre-empt: 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: Final installment in The Connection's series "Presidents at war." Lyndon Baines Johnson inherited the oval office and the war in Vietnam. Why his war on poverty was overcome by his war on Communism in Southeast Asia [rpt 0406] 1606-1700 *WHYY RADIO TIMES: In wartime, new phrases and terms seep into popular language as government and military officials, journalists, and citizens attempt to describe and define a nation's actions. Our guests are Rutgers English professor and "doublespeak" expert, Bill Lutz, and journalism ethicist Keith Woods of the Poynter Institute 1630-1700 *BBCR4 The Material World: Quentin Cooper finds out how Geoconservation - preserving areas of land with geological significance and international importance - is going global, and how Britain is leading the way 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Why Do People Hate America? Guests: Ziauddin Sardar: writer and cultural critic; Merryl Wyn Davis: writer and anthropologist; The authors of the book WHY DO PEOPLE HATE AMERICA? will discuss this topic in the context of America's own perception of itself and how these feelings might be changing in light of the war % 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): The meaning of patriotism. Guests: Cecilia Elizabeth O'Leary, associate professor of history at CSU Monterey, is the author of "To Die For: The Paradox of American Patriotism"; Gil Ferguson, retired Lt. Col. United States Marine Corps, former State Assemblyman and Chairman of the California Republican Assembly Publications Committee; Helal Omeria, executive director of the Council on American Islamic Relations, Northern California Chapter; and Eva Jefferson Paterson, executive director of the Lawyer's Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area 1806-1900 *KQED FORUM with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Forum has a one-on- one discussion with Alice Walker about her most recent work and current events. Author and poet Walker's "Absolute Trust in the Goodness of the Earth" is her first book of poetry in over a decade 1930-2400 *BBCR3 Radio 3 Awards For World Music: The sounds of planet earth, celebrated in a concert featuring all the winners in the nine categories of this year's Awards. The Poll Winners' Concert was held on Monday at Ocean in London, hosted by Verity Sharp and Rita Ray. Lucy Duran meets some of the musicians, jury members and the audience at Ocean DETAILS 2000-2030 *BBCR4 The Thistle And The Rose: Louise Yeoman examines the twenty year correspondence between Elizabeth I and young successor, King James, who would eventually inherit Elizabeth's throne 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Analysis: A Silver Lining: As conventional wisdom tells as we're doomed to an impoverished future, Diane Coyle asks whether the economic solution lies with young people. [Rptd Sun 2030 UT] 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: The current war was not thrust upon the America public – We chose it. So says Kathleen Dunn's guest today. Guest: Andrew Bacevich (Base-A-Vitch) Prof of International Relations BOSTON UNIVERSITY "American Empire: The Realities and Consequences of U.S. Diplomacy" 2206-2300 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: A critic of the Bush Administration's war effort with Iraq. Guest: Dennis Sandole (San-doe-lee) Professor INSTITUTE FOR CONFLICT ANALYSIS & RESOLUTION – George Mason University 2300-2330 *BBCR4 I Think I've Got A Problem: New comedy about a man who can't stop breaking into song. Tom is sent to a special centre for the entertainingly afflicted, where his treatment seems to be going well. With Suggs and Bob Monkhouse 2306-2400 *WPRi Dave Berkman for Kathleen Dunn: Harper's Magazine editor Lewis Lapham. "CAUSE FOR DISSENT: Ten Questions for the Bush Regime" Harper's April issue UT FRI MARCH 28 FRIDAYS Libyan Arab Jamahiriya British Evacuation Day St. John Capistran 0030-XXXX *WABE Between the Lines: Nikki Giovanni: Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea: When Nikki Giovanni's poems first emerged during the Civil Rights and Black Arts Movements of the 1960s, she immediately took a place among the most celebrated and influential poets of the era. With this collection of new poems, she continues to stand as one of the most commanding, luminous voices to grace America's political and poetic landscape. Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea is a masterpiece that explores the ecstatic union between self and community, a meditation on humanity and soul. It's Giovanni's relevatory gaze at the world in which we live--and her confession on the world she dreams we will one day call home [repeated Sat 2230] 0100-0200 *WCPN Voices of Public Intellectuals: Women and the Law: "Beyond the Sanitized Workplace: A New Vision of Feminism, Sexuality and Gender Equality": After demonstrating that many firms are punishing employees for sexual conduct, and even workplace dating, in the name of complying with the sexual harassment law, Vicki Schultz calls upon employers and feminists to integrate companies along gender lines. Schultz discusses how companies can create egalitarian workplaces, in which female and male employees can work with managers to set their own sexual norms 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: "On the Homefront: Northern California." In times of war, communities respond. A collaborative series between KQED Public Radio, KQED Public Television 9, and KQED.org [wouldn`t that be ``among``?] This 10 part program seeks to provide a time and place for people of the Bay Area to pause and reflect on the human impact of war in our daily lives. Through a variety of perspectives, we will explore topics such as coping with fear, the role of spirituality, the definition of patriotism, the financial impact of war, how we can hold public officials accountable, and talking with our children about war 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: British Prime Minister Tony Blair visits the U.S. to press his case for UN-led reconstruction in Iraq and the need to put the roadmap to Mideast peace back on the fast track. On The Connection after nine: Testing the strength of the alliance...a special BBC simulcast. 0400-0500 *KQED Cleveland City Club Forum: Dr. Elizabeth Broun, director of the Smithsonian American Art Museum 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: Final installment in The Connection's series "Presidents at war." Lyndon Baines Johnson inherited the oval office and the war in Vietnam. Why his war on poverty was overcome by his war on Communism in Southeast Asia 0606-0700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Rebroadcast): Forum discusses the meaning of patriotism. Guests: Cecilia Elizabeth O'Leary, associate professor of history at CSU Monterey, is the author of "To Die For: The Paradox of American Patriotism"; Gil Ferguson, retired Lt. Col. United States Marine Corps, former State Assemblyman and Chairman of the California Republican Assembly Publications Committee; Helal Omeria, executive director of the Council on American Islamic Relations, Northern California Chapter; and Eva Jefferson Paterson, executive director of the Lawyer's Committee for Civil Rights of the San Francisco Bay Area 1230-1430 *CBCR1 The Current: The war in Iraq is barely a week old, but the fight for tenders to rebuild that country has already begun. Also...General Motors has been forced to pull one of its ads because it suggested that buses are full of weirdos. The Current looks at the automaker's past efforts to undermine public transit. And Friday host Jim Brown talks with a St. John's native who is teaching in Hong Kong - focal point of the SARS outbreak [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1506-1600 *WPRi Jean Feraca: Journalist John Nichols joins Jean Feraca to analyse the different perspectives on the war on Iraq reported around the world. Nichols is Associate Editor of The Capital Times and co-author of "Our Media, Not Theirs" jnichols@captimes.com [repeat at 0306] 1530-1600 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: Young Acadians from Cheticamp in Cape Breton talk about the dilemma many of them face: to stay in their small community and face unemployment, or to leave for the big city. Many choose exile - so many that the Cheticamp area has lost more than nine percent of its Francophone population over the past five years. Find out what some young Acadians are trying to do about it [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1600-1700 *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House: The Laramie Project: In 1998, Mathew Shephard, a gay student at the University of Wyoming, was murdered in a widely reported hate crime. The Laramie Project, which opens at Iowa City's Riverside Theatre, is a contemporary theatrical work sparked by the crime. Live excerpts from the production set the scene for a discussion about tolerance in Iowa. Guests include the director of the production Jody Hovland and Riverside Theatre actors, as well as Linda Kroon of the Women's Resource and Action Center. Live music by singer/songwriter Deb Tiemens 1600-1700 *BBCR3 Jazz Legends: Freddie Hubbard Quintet: Julian Joseph introduces highlights from a BBC recorded concert by the American trumpeter and composer at London's Round House as part of the 1983 Camden Jazz Festival. Hubbard plays trumpet and flugelhorn with Bob Sheppard (tenor sax), Hilton Ruiz (piano), Herbie Lewis (bass) and Carl Allen (drums). 1606-1700 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: Find out how the town of Oaxaca (wah-HA-kah), Mexico, successfully repulsed McDonalds and preserved their regional fried grasshoppers. Jean Feraca talks with a Mexican American chef who runs a cooking school in the heart of rural Mexico. Guest: Susana Trilling, a chef and the owner of Seasons of My Heart Cooking School in Oaxaca, Mexico. Author of "Seasons of My Heart" (Ballantine) companion to the PBS series of the same name. http://www.seasonsofmyheart.com [repeat at 0406][NOT: could not reach her in Oaxaca, so John Nichols did another hour] 1800-XXXX *SDPB South Dakota Forum: NPR President/CEO Kevin Klose 1806-1900 *KQED Forum: with Friday Forum host Angie Coiro (Hour Two): Examining the theory and practive of "cyber-activism" and discusses its impact on, and implications in, the political process. Guests: Michael Ayers, co-editor of "Cyberactivism: Online Activism in Theory and Practice" and graduate student in the Department of Sociology at New School University; Carol Darr, director at the Institute for Politics, Democracy & the Internet; Eli Pariser, international campaigns director for moveon.org; Brian Bodine, co-organizer of a Rally for America and officer in the Young Conservatives of Texas at the University of Texas at Austin; and Howard Rheingold, technology critic, forecaster, former founding executive of HotWired, and author of "Smart Mobs: the Next Social Revolution." 1830-1900 *BBCR4 The News Quiz: A tongue in cheek review of the week's news, brought to you by Simon Hoggart, Alan Coren, Francis Wheen, Linda Smith and Rory Bremner 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: A war against Iraq could spark a whole new generation of hatred against the United States. Today after three, Kathleen Dunn's guest talks about why. Guest: John Moyers, editor in chief TomPaine.Com, a public interest journal 2200-2230 *BBCR2 The Music Never Ends: The Michel Legrand Story. Le Chanson: Michel was born in Paris in 1932. His childhood was very sad and solitary, bt when he was ten years old, he entered the Paris Conservatory of Music. That place became 'his home, his planet, and his language, for eleven years'. During the war, jazz was forbidden by the Germans, but in 1947, Legrand discovered Dizzy Gillespie and never looked back. This programme considers the music that inspired the artist and remembers his albums, 'I Love Paris', which became one of the best-selling instrumental records ever released, and 'Legrand Jazz' which featured collaborations with Miles Davis, John Coltrane, Ben Webster, Bill Evans, Hank Jones, and Phil Woods. 2215-2330 *BBCR3 Andy Kershaw: Congolese musical pioneer Wendo Kolosoy performs an exclusive set at the BBC Maida Vale studios. One of the first recording artists from the Congo, he's still making albums at the age of 75, and his biggest hit, the song Marie Louise, is reputed to raise the dead and heal the sick 2306-2400 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: Bias in the news with the author of "What Liberal Media?" Guest: Eric Alterman, author "What Liberal Media: The Truth About BIAS and the News" UT SAT MARCH 29 SATURDAYS Central African Rep Boganda Madagascar Celebration of the 1947 Uprising Taiwan Youth Day; St. Eustace 0306-0400 *WPRi Jean Feraca: Journalist John Nichols joins Jean Feraca to analyse the different perspectives on the war on Iraq reported around the world. Nichols is Associate Editor of The Capital Times and co-author of "Our Media, Not Theirs" jnichols@captimes.com 0400-0500 *KQED Commonwealth Club: Norman Mailer, the author of "The Executioner's Song" and "The Naked and the Dead." The outspoken and controversial author draws from his experience to shed light on what he sees as the most significant challenge confronting humanity in the 21st century and what should be done about it. At age 80, this icon of American literature has written 32 books, including two Pulitzer Prize-winning novels 0406-0500 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: Find out how the town of Oaxaca (wah-HA-kah), Mexico, successfully repulsed McDonalds and preserved their regional fried grasshoppers. Jean Feraca talks with a Mexican American chef who runs a cooking school in the heart of rural Mexico. Guest: Susana Trilling, a chef and the owner of Seasons of My Heart Cooking School in Oaxaca, Mexico. Author of "Seasons of My Heart" (Ballantine) companion to the PBS series of the same name. http://www.seasonsofmyheart.com [NOT: could not reach her in Oaxaca, so John Nichols did another hour] 1300-1400 *BBCR3 World Routes: Lucy Duran is joined live in the studio by one of Israel's leading performers of Ladino music. Yasmin Levy has become a great champion of Judeo-Spanish culture, and her music fuses the sounds of Arabic airs with flamenco rhythms. There's also a look at some of the most interesting new Greek records around with Thalia Iakovidou, and Andrew McGregor reviews the latest release in the Nonesuch Explorer series. This new collection features vintage recordings from the South Pacific and Indonesia 1311-1600 *CBCR1 Culture, Conflict and Politics: The House, Dispatches, and Global Village join forces in a special broadcast, called Conflict, Culture and Politics: Reflections and Ripples from the war in Iraq. It's a three-hour journey through stories of war, of politics and culture. With correspondents in the Middle East, expert guests, musicians and other artists, these three programs combine to explore how conflict changes countries and lives [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Sunflowers: To celebrate the 150th anniversary of Van Gogh's birth, Tim Marlow investigates the passion for sunflowers that obsessed him during his final fraught year. With Antony Sher as Van Gogh 1605-1659 *CBCR1 QUIRKS & QUARKS: Encore Presentation of The Quirks Holiday Question Show. Yes - it's another chance to hear the award- winning Question Show from last December. Find out why snow is white, why bugs are attracted to light, whether dinosaurs had ears, and what would happen if the sun went out [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1700-1800 *WQXR Making Music in Monaco - guest Marek Janowski, director of the Monte Carlo Philharmonic: Beginning with an Alban Berg Quartet recording of Schubert's "Death and the Maiden" Quartet (No. 14 in D minor, 4th movement), this program spotlights Marek Janowski, the music director of the Monte Carlo Philharmonic. Mr. Janowski talks about the orchestra's programming and upcoming season, which includes a performance at the Monaco Palace of Berlioz' Symphonie fantastique and Les nuits d'ete; this is followed by a performance of the "March to the Scaffold" from Symphonie fantastique by Lorin Maazel leading The Cleveland Orchestra 1705-2100 *CBCR1 Definitely Not the Opera: Sook-Yin Lee welcomes Peter Brown for a special live broadcast. Hear one artist's silent protest against the war in Iraq...and the Media Panel looks at whether journalists travelling with the troops tell the whole story. Ad man Mike Tennant looks at how the world of advertising deals with war, and they'll have Lojo, caught live in concert [+1/2/3/4 hours? Promoted as ``live in all time zones`` -- so disrupting other programming? Or longer than 4 hours so that each zone can take portion at local 1:05-5 p.m.??? Central zone feed continued with Culture, Conflict & Politics at 1705] 1800-1830 *BBCR3 Jazz File: Significant Others: Booker Little: Jez Nelson continues his occasional series of profiles of Jazz musicians deserving greater recognition. Trumpeter Booker Little quickly became a master of his instrument, before his career was tragically cut short at just twenty-three years old. At the time of his death, it was said Little could have become bigger than Miles Davis, with a technical excellence only surpassed by his emotional richness. Upon joining Max Roach aged twenty, he was one of the first trumpeters to develop his own sound after the death of Clifford Brown. In a career which also included dates with Mal Waldron and John Coltrane, Little found a perfect match in maverick saxophonist Eric Dolphy, and with Dolphy was credited as being one of the innovators of the early post bop sound 1806-1900 *WHYY BEEN THERE DONE THAT with Marty Goldensohn: explores the illusion of safety and the price of homeland the security. Also, how consumer psychology affects the economy; a reality check of Hollywood's war movies; and the scent of seduction -- power of perfume. Also, Silas Marner revisited; the science of color -- how we see blue in a butterfly's wings; and media manipulation. Visit our website at http://www.whyy.org/btdt for information, links and all our archived programs 1806-1900 *WBEZ Special: Discussing media coverage on Iraq from NPR's On the Media 1925-1945 *BBCR3 MET OPERA INTERVAL: Letters From The New World: For the Metropolitan Opera Concerts a series of personal talks from non-native residents of America. Outerness - A Story Or Two: The Irish writer Colum McCann (author of Dancer, a novel based on Rudolf Nureyev's life), a resident of New York, thinks about what it is that makes America different from Ireland [something else on non-BBC networks; time approx.] 2000-2100 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: 400 Years On: Joan Bakewell selects highlights from Elizabethan Echoes, the Radio 4 season marking 400 years since the death of Queen Elizabeth I 2000-2100 *WLRN Beyond War: War Without End Part 1: What explains the increasing rate of civilian casualties in war? What does it mean, for soliders "and for their targets" to drop a bomb or fire high-powered weapons of destruction? What are the physical and emotional effects? What are the other costs? What values and beliefs motivate soldiers? What other agendas bring about war? How does the military turn ordinary citizens into fighters, and, how do media portrayals of war compare with the real experience? 2040-2100 *BBCR3 MET OPERA INTERVAL: The Cloisters: Tim Marlow visits the Cloisters, a part of the New York Metropolitan Museum of Art devoted to medieval acquisitions [something else on non-BBC networks; time approx.] 2100-2130 *WPRi Rewind: The very last Rewind program ever. Rewind is going out of production and, after today, will no longer be available for broadcast on Wisconsin Public Radio. Coming up next week at this time, the best of Larry Meiller. (Mee-ler). We'll rebroadcast a half hour with one of Larry's popular regular guests from his weekday program 2100-2200 *BBCR2 James Taylor: Live And Exclusive: The Grammy Award-winning American singer-songwriter performs a special Live and Exclusive set for Radio 2 at the Mermaid Theatre, London 2215-2300 *BBCR3 The Verb: For thirty years Verbatim, The Language Quarterly, has been publishing essays about the byways of English, from the roots of medieval words to the components of football chants. At last a collection of its essays has been published and in this week's showcase of new writing, language and performance Ian McMillan luxuriates in this linguistic jacuzzi along with the editor and some contributors. To counter the obsession with writing by the youthful, The Verb proudly presents the greatest living writer in Wales, Emyr Humphreys, author of twenty novels and several collections of short stories and poetry. Now in his eighties, his writing is as vigorous as ever and his latest book, Old People Are A Problem, is absolutely contemporary, dealing with asylum-seeking, cultural and political nationalism and environmental protest. Ian McMillan talks to Humphreys, who reads his most recent story 2230-2300 *BBCR4 The Musical Triumphs And... Growing up in the musically sophisticated court of her father Henry VIII, Elizabeth acquired a love of music that would inspire her to create a musical establishment reflecting the splendour of her own international court. As a talented musician herself, Elizabeth took great pleasure in the lavish musical ceremonies and entertainments that were a feature of her reign. Despite her Protestant reforms, Elizabeth was happy to include the kind of elaborate music associated with the Catholic mass into services held in her Chapel Royal. However, in parish churches across the land, music was regarded as a distraction from the word of God and virtually disappeared altogether. Terry Edwards investigates the sacred and secular music surrounding Elizabeth in light of the cultural, political and religious upheavals of her reign 2230-XXXX *WABE Between the Lines: Nikki Giovanni: Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea: When Nikki Giovanni's poems first emerged during the Civil Rights and Black Arts Movements of the 1960s, she immediately took a place among the most celebrated and influential poets of the era. With this collection of new poems, she continues to stand as one of the most commanding, luminous voices to grace America's political and poetic landscape. Quilting the Black-Eyed Pea is a masterpiece that explores the ecstatic union between self and community, a meditation on humanity and soul. It's Giovanni's relevatory gaze at the world in which we live--and her confession on the world she dreams we will one day call home UT SUN MARCH 30 SUNDAYS DST begins in Europe; A-03 Malaysia Sultan's Anniversary (Kelantan only) Benin parliamentary elections Trinidad and Tobago Baptist Day Cyprus referendum 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Global Village: Host Jowi Taylor has an encore presentation of Culture and Conflict, featuring Farida - the Voice of Mesopotamia, Farhad Darya, Laco Tayfa, the Dope Poet Society and reflections on a musical life in war zones from Mighty Popo and Saif Shaheen [+1/2/3 hours] 0100-0200 *WOIa Capitol Steps: A one hour political satire special from the Washington, D.C. comedy group [see April 1; half-hour??] [padded with pledge breaks; many other stations postponed] 0100-0300 *WCNY Choral Traditions with Bonnie Beth Derby: A BIRTHDAY TRIBUTE TO SIR WILLIAM WALTON (b. 1902). Celebrating the birthday of Sir William Walton, tonight's edition of Choral Traditions offers a number of his choral works including the Coronation Te Deum, Four Carols, the "Coventry" Missa Brevis, a delightful setting of the "Jubilate Deo", and "A Litany". Also included will be a performance of "Belshazzar's Feast" with the Atlanta Symphony Orchestra and Chorus conducted by Robert Shaw 0200-0300 *WBEZ Performance Space: Highlights from the 2002 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival 0200-0300 *WOIa Beyond War: The sacrifices of war are often glorified by politicians and entertainment media. This program examines what the actual experience of war means - physically, emotionally, and environmentally - to both soldiers and civilians. Combatants, human rights activists, war survivors, physicians, historians, and others bear witness and share their incisive views. The program also considers America's economic and social investment in the military, for example, the recent proposal by the White House of $396 billion for FY03 0300-0330 *WJIE WORLD OF RADIO new time +7490 0300-0400 *WOIa Prairie Lights: New Yorker writer Calvin Trillin will read from his brilliantly funny new novel, "Tepper Isn't Going Out," about a subject that is dear to the heart of every Iowa Citian: parking 0400-0500 *WHYY AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Takes you to the streets of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Salvador de Bahia, Brazil for the annual pre-Lenten extravaganzas of music, musical stories, street theater, and scandal. Find out who won the Trinny people's choice-the Road March. What did the always clever, topical Calypsonians have to say about current affairs in the Middle East? And enjoy the carnival songs blasted from the trio electricos mounted on huge trucks trolling through exuberant crowds in Salvador de Bahia. Non-stop party, here we come. 1300-1400 *BBCR3 BBC Legends: Kirsten Flagstad: In her time the Norwegian soprano was considered the perfect Wagnerian. Hilary Finch explores her BBC archive recordings and reviews her career. Featuring songs by Grieg and Schubert, and a performance of Wagner's Wesendonck-Lieder 1311-1600 *CBCR1 The Sunday Edition: The Outsiders Panel tackles Iraq - the war, the possible consequences and more. And Music as a Refuge: lawyer T. Sher Singh, author and Morley Torgov, actor Yanna Mcintosh and journalist and activist June Callwood tell host Michael Enright about some of the favourite musical pieces into which they retreat during stressful times such as these [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1600-1645 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Subtitled 'The Inextinguishable', Nielsen's fourth symphony presents a musical view of mankind's yearning for life. Stephen Johnson ponders over the elemental arguments of Nielsen's characterisation with the help of the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, conducted by Peter Stark. There's a complete performance of Nielsen's Symphony No.4 (Op. 29) in Performance On 3 at 1845 UT on Friday 1600-XXXX *YPR The semi-annual classical music quiz with Uri Barnea and Don McComas [wish they would mention program names!] 1645-1730 *BBCR3 The Sunday Feature: Do What You Will: Francois Rabelais' celebration of the individual was summed up by the only rule that the giant Gargantua gave to the inmates of his monastery: 'Do What You Will'. Together with his knowledge of medicine, theology and the literature of the Greeks and Romans, Rabelais was one of the cornerstones of the Renaissance. A celebrator of life in all its excesses - laughter, sex, food, drink, he created a Rabelaisian world in his Five Books led by Pantagruel and Gargantua. He died 450 years ago in 1553, and Julian Evans travels in search of the man through the Paris and Loire that he loved, and talks to those for whom the work is one of the great literary treasures 1700-1800 *KGOU Her Stories: A (((HearingVoices))) Radio Special: A one-hour radio special for Women's History Month (March), with Guest Host: Dmae [sic] Roberts, from Stories1st.org: • The Kitchen Sisters at Tupperware® parties. • A supermarket checker checks out her life. • Jenafir's sound diary of her Peace Corps years. • A collage of and about sisters by Dmae Roberts. • Photographer Anna Lee deals with breast cancer. • Susan Stone's tale of Ruby and her husbands. • Poems by Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Battson and Meryn Cadell. 1800-1900 *KGOU National Press Club ~ Terrence D. Jones: Description: Terrence D. Jones, President and CEO, Wolf Trap Foundation for the Performing Arts, will discuss "Education and the Arts: A Vital Role... A Crtical Link. Mr. Jones will be joined by special celebrity guest, Keter Betts, legendary jazz bassist for Ella Fitzgerald and Wolftrap Institute Founding Artist. Recorded on Tuesday, March 25, 2003 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Alan Keith: A Tribute: A farewell programme made by Alan Keith before his death earlier this month, and broadcast now in tribute 2000-2200 *WQXR Live from Trinity Church Wall Street: A Song to David by William Albright, Featuring New Digital Organ. As part of its ongoing support of the music programs of Trinity Church Wall Street, WQXR will broadcast a live concert performance of William Albright's A Song to David, performed by the Trinity Choir and organist Dean Billmeyer, conducted by Dr. Owen Burdick. This performance marks the debut of the Church's new state-of-the -art digital organ. Soon after his release from a mental asylum in 1763, Christopher Smart's 86-stanza poem, A Song to David – an epic work rejoicing in God through the life and works of David, was published in London. Set to music in 1983 by the late composer William Albright (1944-1998), the work, which is scored for double chorus, four soloists, narrators, and organ, was commissioned by the Cathedral Church of St. Mark, in Minneapolis. Dean Billmeyer, the organist who premiered the work, will perform the virtuoso organ part. This concert will be the first in a year-long series of dedicatory recitals featuring the new state-of-the-art Marshall & Ogletree digital organ. This instrument far surpasses any other electronic organ with respect to sonic realism and sheer computing power: 60 channels of digital audio fed through 60 specially designed speakers and 6 sub woofers. This instrument, driven by over 20 computers working in tandem, is intended as a long-term interim solution while Trinity restores or rebuilds its Aeolian Skinner pipe organs which were destroyed by the dust and debris from the 9/11 attack. Ground Zero is located just 600 feet from Trinity Church [NOT! tho on the monthly specials list, not heard, and not shown on the playlist! Get your act together!] 2000-2200 *WMNR THE NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC: tape delayed from a performance in January. Lorin Maazel Conductor, Julia Fischer Violin: Tchaikovsky Romeo and Juliet Fantasy - Overture Sibelius Violin Concerto Stravinsky Petrouchka (1911) [replacing the original program as Rostropovich was indisposed] 2100-2200 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: comedian and commentator Al Franken 2105-2300 *CBCR1 Cross Country Checkup: Canada-US discord. This week the U-S ambassador to Canada rebuked the Chretien government for not supporting the war in Iraq ...and for ignoring several Liberal MP's anti-American remarks. What do you think? Is the war damaging Canada-US relations? [live in all zones] 2300-2400 *WGBH The Whole Wide World, Part 3: Modern refugees describe the state of statelessness, joined by theater director Peter Sellars 2300-2400 *WBEZ The Whole Wide World: Part three of a seven-part series decoding the riddles of globalism UT MON MARCH 31 MONDAYS Malta Liberty Day; St. Benjamin Palestinian Authority Day of the Land - Yom al-Ardh Alaska Seward's day; Argentina Malvinas Day 0000-0100 *CAINAN Hearing Voices: Backroads 0000-0100 *WBEZ Children of War: Fighting, Dying, Surviving (NPR): CNN bureau chief and former NPR reporter Charlayne Hunter-Gault hosts this one-hour documentary that provides a global perspective of the dangers facing children in conflict zones and their recovery from war 0100-0200 *WBEZ Poet Laureate Contest (Chicago Public Radio): We'll have ten poets read their submitted short work on the air, a panel will consider the works, listeners will be able to vote by telephone and E-mail, and we'll chose three poets to recommend to the governor. Of course, our recommendations will carry no special weight with Mr. Blagojevich, but it should be fun 0100-0200 *CAINAN Whole Wide World with Christopher Lydon 0200-0300 *CAINAN She Got Game 0300-0400 *CAINAN Tell Me How Long Trane's Been Gone II: John Coltrane 0300-0400 *CBCR1 Sunday Showcase: Hear the conclusion of the seventh annual Bell Canada Reading Series from the Shaw Festival. This week, "Panama Hattie" - music and Lyrics by Cole Porter, book by Herbert Fields and B.G. DeSylva, adapted by Christopher Newton and Paul Sportelli. There are many pre-war musicals that have slipped into obscurity and here's one of the most delightful: Cole Porter's saucy tale about a brassy night-club owner in Panama. Hattie is being wooed by a wealthy divorced naval officer. In its first run, Panama Hattie was a fun and kooky musical vehicle for Ethel Merman [+1/2/3 hours] 0300-0400 *WOIa Prairie Lights: James Autry of Des Moines is one of Iowa's great treasures. Poet, businessman, humanist and humanitarian, Autry's work has done more to soften the hard edges and needless unkindness of business as it is often practiced today. He will read from his latest book, "The Spirit of Retirement." 0500-0600 *WYSO Radio Documentary Series: Hearing Voices: Her Stories. WYSO concludes the March observance of Women's History Month with a documentary produced by Dmae [sic] Roberts. She provides a sound collage by and about sisterhood with Mei Mei, and joins other independent producers in public radio featuring stories of the remarkable women in our everyday lives. Jake Warga offers us a sound diary of a woman's two year Peace Corps stint in Africa, ZBS provides a mini-drama as supermarket checked Dollar Dollardaze checks out her life, and the Kitchen Sisters look into the cultural phenomenon of Tupperware Parties 0500-0600 *WBEZ Performance Space: Highlights from the 2002 New Orleans Jazz and Heritage Festival 0530-0630 *KUNM Radio Theater, "Mars vs. New Mexico!" A variation on "The War of the Worlds," set in the Land of Enchantment. (Recorded live at the Outpost Performance Space in January. See the program description for Sunday, March 23, 1800) 0606-0700 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Philip Taubman, an Editor with the New York Times who has specialized in national security and intelligence gathering. We'll find out how American space surveillance all began, about the role of President Dwight D. Eisenhower in the creation of such cutting edge technologies as the U2 spy plane and covert satellite imaging. Moira will also speak with Duncan Watts, a professor of sociology at Columbia University. His focus is on the science of network behavior, and how all the networks around us - from power lines to the Internet and even people - operate in the very same way. 1500-1530 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Women's Institute: For Mothering Sunday, Sheila Dillon examines the impact of The Women's Institute on British food culture and politics 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: Gershwin Crazy! Edward Seckerson celebrates songs by one of Broadway's greatest legends, including Strike Up The Band, The Man I Love and Embraceable You 1606-1700 *NPR DIANE REHM: SARS: A panel about the possible causes of a mysterious, contagious new lung infection, dubbed severe acute respiratory syndrome (SARS), that seems to have emerged in China and spread to at least 13 countries, including the U.S. Dr. David Brandling-Bennett, deputy director of the Pan American Health Organization, the regional office of the World Health Organization; Dr. Shmuel Shoham, infectious disease specialist at the Washington Hospital Center; Rob Stein, science reporter with the Washington Post 1606-1700 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: When it's all war, all the time--not just on TV and radio, but the Internet, too--is your need to know being served or is it too much information? How war-dot-com is shaping public opinions and perceptions about events in Iraq 1606-1700 *WHYY RADIO TIMES: The language of war...in times of war, new phrases and words emerge and some seep into the popular vernacular. Our guests are Jim Dawes of Macalester College, author of "The Language of War," and Rutgers professor Bill Lutz, author of "Doublespeak: Why No One Knows What Anyone's Saying Anymore." 1806-1900 *MichR TODD MUNDT: see below [rpt 0106] 1806-1900 *WHYY TODD MUNDT: We take several classic 19th century literary characters - The Invisible Man, Mina Hardy and Captain Nemo among others - and bring them together in the late 1800s as an elite crime fighting team. It's the basis for an oddly compelling comic book, "The League of Extraordinary Gentlemen." 1806-1900 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Journalists from Coalition of the Willing Countries share their perspectives on the war in Iraq. Patrick Jackson, Professor of International Relations, School of International Service, American University; Jose Calvo, Journalist, El Pais Newspaper; Michael Binyon, Foreign Specialist, London Times; Rachel Van Dongen, Correspondent, Christian Science Monitor 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: Updated version of Claire Bolderson's report last December on misery in one of the most exclusive holiday spots of the Caribbean. Thousands of men and women have fled Haiti, the poorest country in the Western Hemisphere, but live in constant fear of deportation. Many are denied health care, even if they have AIDS. Many of their children are barred from local schools. Britain has attempted over the years to grant considerable autonomy to its remaining "colonies" or overseas territories. In attempting to shed the role of imperial ruler, is it failing in its legal duty to uphold human rights? Claire looks at the changes which have taken place since this campaigning programme was broadcast, and asks whether there's been a change of heart in Whitehall. 2000-2030 *BBCR4 State Of Africa: Second in a three-part series in which Julian Pettifer examines the plight of Africa's wildlife in the face of the continent's human tragedy. Today he looks at the state of human health in Africa. 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Live From The Stables: Dame Cleo Laine and John Dankworth present a six-part series showcasing the finest jazz. In this programme ex-Police Guitarist, Andy Summers, who has recently been inducted into the Rock 'n' Roll Hall of fame with The Police, plays music off his new album. Legendary Jazz Pianist Stan Tracy performs pieces including his totally original version of 'Somewhere Over The Rainbow', and actress and jazz singer, Jacqui Dankworth sings songs from her new album. All this, and features from Cleo and the band made up of Sam Mayne Alan Barnes, Jimmy Hastings, Julian Siegel, Jamie Talbot, Noel Langley, Guy Barker, Martin Shaw, Tony Fisher, Henry Lowther, Bill Geldard, Colin Hill, Mark Nightingale, Andy Wood, Dave Powell, John Horler, Alec Dankworth, Allan Ganley and Ralph Salmons 2100-2200 *OPB 2003 Voices of Public Intellectuals: Women and the Law: Exploring gender and the public and private rights of citizens through the lens of the law. Now in its fourth year, the Voices of Public Intellectuals lecture series defines issues affecting civic life. The language of equality in American law and tradition has not always translated to practices of equality. Women's rights continue to be different from men's. Addressing such topics as domestic violence, sexual harassment law, and citizenship issues, three invited scholars, lawyers, and historians explore, in accessible terms, gender and the public and private rights of citizens. Lectures and Speakers: Beyond the Sanitized Workplace: A New Vision of Feminism, Sexuality, and Gender Equality: Vicki Schultz, Yale University Law School http://www.radcliffe.edu/vpi/ 2306-2400 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: In her seventh Great Decisions program, Kathleen Dunn and her guest discuss the latest on war in Afghanistan and how it relates to the war in Iraq. Guest: Neamat Nojumi, (Nee-a-mott No-zumi) member of the Mujaheddin in the 1980s "The Rise of the Taliban in Afghanistan: Mass Mobilization, Civil War & The Future of the Region" former consultant – US Agency for International Development on Economic Security and Political Survival of Afghanistan UT TUE APRIL 1 TUESDAYS Iran Islamic Republic Day Cyprus EOKA Day; San Marino Regency Exchange; St. Hugh 0000-0030 *WABE Capitol Steps: "Politics Takes a Holiday - The April Fool's Edition" - Break out the duct tape and seal the windows, so the neighbors can't hear you laughing at the Capitol Steps! That's right, the Capitol Steps NOT doing an April Fool's special is about as likely as Dan Rather asking Saddam Hussein, "Boxers or briefs?" After all, where else could you hear Hans Blix and the Inspectors, the new rock group that is mine-sweeping the nation with hits like: "I-N-S-P-E-C-T," "Lookin' for Scuds in All the Wrong Places," and "I Want to Hold Your Hans," not to mention, the Vice President's newest release, "Cheney and the Jets!" Website [many more stations, times]: http://www.capsteps.com/radio 0101-0130 *KGOU The Capitol Steps April-Fools' Edition: The Capitol Steps, the only group in America that attempts to be funnier than the Congress, is a troupe of current and former Congressional staffers who monitor events and personalities on Capitol Hill, in the Oval Office, and in other centers of power and prestige around the world and then take a humorous look at serious issues while providing a nationwide laugh for millions... Tune in your radio for the yearly edition of the Capitol Steps' "Politics Takes a Holiday : April Fools' 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Ideas: Sailing Horses. The horse was a partner to the Plains Cree, not a simple beast of burden. Winnipeg writer Maureen Matthews explores the complex relationship between horse and human through the experiences of one Cree family [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 *MichR TODD MUNDT: See 1806 Mon 0200-xxxx *CPR COLORADO SPOTLIGHT debuts Tu-Sa, classical, opera performance [max one hour; this one 42 minutes] 0230-0330 *KPBS ABRAHAM: THE LOUNGE: Dirk's guest is Bruce Feiler, author of Walking the Bible and now Abraham, a captivating biography of Abraham as the metaphor embodying three of the world's major religions: Christianity, Judaism and Islam. At a time when conflict between these three faiths threatens to tear the world apart, this thoughtful book brings us back to the common roots that unite rather than divide us. Also on the show is performance artist James Luna, a resident of the La Jolla Indian Reservation. Luna has created humorous and yet uncomfortable vignettes to make us look at our own prejudices 0305-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: TBA if not deportive 0400-0500 *KQED TBA: [online schedule has been incomplete] 0406-0500 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: When it's all war, all the time--not just on TV and radio, but the Internet, too--is your need to know being served or is it too much information? How war-dot-com is shaping public opinions and perceptions about events in Iraq 1015-1100 WTBQ-1110, Warwick, NY will conduct a DX test 1245-1300 *BBCR4 The Secrets Of Maps: The Peters Projection: Simon Calder undertakes a four-part investigation of maps and their makers, uncovering maps' secrets, propaganda and influence. In 1973 Arno Peters created a map which he claimed gave a fairer view of the world, showing the true area of all countries. Are his claims correct, or is his map another piece of political propaganda? 1430-1445 *BBCR4 Opening Lines: Guatemala Moon: By Clare Bayley and read by Bruno Lastra. A beautifully crafted tale about the struggle to realise your dreams. Oswaldo longs to go to the moon. Orphaned by Guatemalan rebels while still a child, he has to learn to fend for himself and his dreams go forgotten. Starting out as a shoeshine boy he soon progresses to being a bus conductor and then a satellite dish engineer. He reluctantly takes responsibility for a six year old orphan, Juanita, who he befriends on the buses. However, what seems like an added burden soon becomes the key to Oswaldo fulfilling his dreams 1430-1500 *WCPN CAPITOL STEPS APRIL FOOL`S SPECIAL 1445-1500 *BBCR4 A Year In The Life Of Ants: Second in a new five part series charting a year in the life of two colonies of wood ants, with the different hazards posed by the changing seasons. Presented by Peter France 1630-1700 *WAMC CAPITOL STEPS APRIL FOOL`S SPECIAL 1800-2100 *BBCR2 various music series; see DAY [and loads of good stuff on 3 and 4! Reminder that most is available ondemand, if we can ever find the time...] 1800-1900 *BBCR2 Howard Goodall's Classical Connections: Go West: Howard Goodall continues his musical journey from wind lashed coasts and balmy equatorial islands to the port of New York. Today he's joined by composer Richard Rodney Bennett. 1830-1950 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: In The Works: A monthly series that explores the inner workings of masterpieces of 20th-century repertoire. Alban Berg's Violin Concerto was dedicated "to the memory of an angel". Alan Hall deciphers the various influences on the work from the composer's own life and the political atmosphere of the mid-30s. With the help of musicologists and musicians, including violinist Daniel Hope, Douglas Jarman Rosemary Moravec of the Austrian National Library and Regina Busch of the Berg Edition. Berg: Violin Concerto: Anne Sophie Mutter, Chicago Symphony Orchestra, James Levine (conductor) 1900-1940 *BBCR4 The Caste Divide: An investigation into a hidden form of social hierarchy taking hold in Britain today, the Indian caste system. For many of the nearly one million Britons of Indian origin the caste system continues to exert a powerful influence over their everyday lives. Yet it's a subject many feel is still taboo. BBC Community Affairs reporter Naresh Puri hears the stories of some of the estimated 20,000 'untouchables' living in Britain, and from those who still believe in the virtues of caste. He finds out whether tradition can merge with a modern British identity, when it comes to the caste system 1930-2030 *BBCR2 Tonight I'm Yours: Rod Stewart is the world's quintessential vocalist, songwriter, producer, entertainer and jack-the-lad. 'Tonight I'm Yours' will tell the remarkable story of Rod's rise from picture-framing beatnik hobo to multi-million-selling international recording artist. Over three hour-long documentaries, presenter Kate Thornton will trace his incredible music career with exclusive insight from the man himself, his friends, peers and musical collaborators including Ronnie Wood, Elton John, Mick Hucknall, Jim Cregan, John Peel and Trevor Horn. We'll explore Rod's humble beginnings in London's blues dens, his work with The Jeff Beck Group and The Faces, and his varied solo repertoire from 1969's Rod Stewart Album to 2003's American Songbook, and you'll hear his greatest hits from Maggie May to Downtown Train and beyond. Programme One: Rod The Mod The opening programme looks at the early days of Rod Stewart's career including his time busking with Wizz Jones, being spotted playing harmonica by Long John Baldry, his first studio recording of Good Morning Little Schoolgirl, singing with Jimmy Powell and The Dimensions, The Hoochie Coochie Men, Steampacket, Shotgun Express, the Jeff Beck Group and the start of The Faces. Contributors to include Roderick David Stewart, Wizz Jones, Long John Baldry, John Peel, Louis Cennamo, Jeff Beck, Ronnie Wood. Music will include some of Rod's earliest recordings and biggest records of the era including Maggie May, You Wear It Well, Gasoline Alley, and Handbags and Gladrags 1950- 2030 BBCR3 Love Sacred And Love Profane: Ronald Corp conducts the BBC Singers in music celebrating divine love and earthly pleasures. Pablo Casals: O vos omnes Edvard Grieg: Ave maris stella Zoltan Kodaly: Miserere Gustav Holst: Nunc dimittis Gustav Holst: Bring us in good ale R L Pearsall: Lay a garland Ronald Corp: Heraclitus; I strove with none Ciro Pinsuti: In this hour of softened splendour W Sterndale Bennett: Come live with me Antonin Tucapsky: Nunc est bibendum 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Brain Surgery To Cure The Mind: Brain surgery in any shape or form to treat people with psychiatric illness was virtually abandoned after public outcry over the abuse of lobotomies half a century ago. However, recent progress in neuroscience is igniting renewed interest in this field. Graham Easton explores the science and the ethics of operating on the brain to cure the mind. [Rptd Wed at 1530] 2030-2100 *BBCR4 The Long View: Far from being a modern phenomenon cutting edge, garden makeovers were very much in vogue in the 18th century, no where more so than at Painshill in Surrey. This is where presenter Jonathan Freedland meets, among others, Home Front's Diarmuid Gavin to find about an extraordinary garden designer called Charles Hamilton, whose vision included paying a hermit to live in the garden looking picturesque. Unfortunately, Hamilton's living gnome had other ideas 2030-2100 *BBCR2 Branford Marsalis Presents... ...Modern Jazz Classics. Pat Metheny - 80/81: Branford Marsalis presents the series exploring some of the biggest-selling and most influential jazz recordings of the last 40 years 2030-2115 *BBCR3 Night Waves: Two thousand actors, thirty five rooms, four centuries and one continuous shot. Richard Coles and guests discuss Russian Ark, the new film from Alexsandr Sokurov that charts Russian history through the events at its most famous palace, The Hermitage in St Petersburg. The film is remarkable for the fact that it is filmed in one single 96 minute take that encompasses the reigns of Catherine the Great, Nicholas I, Nicholas II, and Peter the Great. 2115-2300 *BBCR3 Late Junction: Verity Sharp presents a selection including Thomas Tallis' 40-voice epic, Spem in Alium, sonatas for prepared piano by John Cage, and trance music from Vietnam. Plus court music from Java, and a canon for computer that's best heard through headphones 2130-2200 *WUGA CAPITOL STEPS UT WED APRIL 2 WEDNESDAYS Hindu, Lao, Navratra, Songkran, Tamil, Telugu, Ugadi New Year Buddhism (Theravada) Mauritius Ougadi; Florida Pascua Florida Day St. Francis of Paula 0000-0030 *KUNI CAPITOL STEPS APRIL FOOL`S SPECIAL 0030-0100 *WCPN CAPITOL STEPS APRIL FOOL`S SPECIAL 0030-0100 *WNIN CAPITOL STEPS APRIL FOOL`S SPECIAL 0030-0100 *WUKY CAPITOL STEPS APRIL FOOL`S SPECIAL 0100-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: From Lincoln Center in New York, pianist Konstantin Lifschitz joins the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in works by Bernstein, Prokofiev and more. With host Eric Friesen 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Regarding the Mexican Pet. You know the story about the Mexican Pet? How about the Choking Doberman? You've surely heard The Hook. Even savvy urban folk fall prey to urban folktales. A panel hosted by Paul Kennedy 0430-0500 *KALW CAPITOL STEPS APRIL FOOL`S SPECIAL 0530-0600 *KUOW RADIO INTERSECTION: Gordon Black interviews Alan Durning of NW Environment Watch about different approaches to sprawl by three Northwest cities - Seattle, Portland and Vancouver % 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed: Laurie Taylor explores the history of the tomato, and how this apparently simple fruit has grown up to act as sign and symbol of contemporary capitalism 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Brain Surgery To Cure The Mind: Brain surgery in any shape or form to treat people with psychiatric illness was virtually abandoned after public outcry over the abuse of lobotomies half a century ago. However, recent progress in neuroscience is igniting renewed interest in this field. Graham Easton explores the science and the ethics of operating on the brain to cure the mind 1530-1600 *KUNM BIONEERS: "Nature And Spirit: It's All Connected." Global healing requires a spiritual transformation of every aspect of life. Rabbi Michael Lerner of Tikkun Magazine, author/ educator Matthew Fox, and Joanna Macy, eco-philosopher and scholar of Buddhism, speak of the profound interconnectedness of all life and the experience of joy, courage and community we need to engage in the healing of the world. Tape #2925. (This is the final installment of Bioneers; Living on Earth returns to the Wednesday 8:30 slot next week.) 1606-1700 *WPRi The Connection: War and the words used to describe it. Euphemisms on the Euphrates..... [repeat at 0406 i.a.] 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: High Powered Microwaves: Guests: Colonel (ret) John Alexander; Carl Conetta, Project on Defense Alternatives; Joe Lovece, Periscope. High Power Electromagnetic Pulse generation techniques and High Power Microwave technology have matured to the point where practical E-bombs are becoming technically feasible. Our guests will discuss this technology and how it might be used in future wars [how about present wars???] 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): Assesses the multi- country outbreak of SARS - Severe Acute Respiratory Syndrome. Guests: Patrick Joseph, medical director of the International Travelers Medical Clinic in San Ramon, medical director of the Virologic Clinical Reference Laboratory in San Francisco and Associate Clinical Professor of Medicine at UCSF; Dr. Susan Fernyak, director of Community Health, Epidemiology and Disease Control at the San Francisco Department of Health; Mike McCarron, Director of Community Affairs at San Francisco International Airport; George Rutherford, interim director of the Institute for Global Health; and Arthur Reingold, professor and head of the division of epidemiology at UC Berkeley School of Public Health 1800-1900 *BBCR2 Nick Barraclough: The Dixie Chicks join Nick in the studio to chat about their startlingly popular music, the new album's extraordinary genre-defying success, and their relationship with the country music industry. Since exploding onto the country music scene in 1997, the Texas-by-way-of- Nashville trio has broken all sales records, set new concert attendances, won millions of fans, and received an avalanche of awards and critical acclaim. Blending enviable bluegrass skills with a brash, irreverent attitude, the Chicks combine respect for country's musical traditions with an unwillingness to be bound by its social ones, creating a sound and image that's instantly recognizable and always engaging. The Chicks' debut CD, Wide Open Spaces, took the country music world by storm in 1998, earning the group top awards and selling more than 11 million copies, the best performance by a debut album in the history of country music. Their follow-up, Fly, proved that the trio was no one-hit wonder. Their third album, Home, however, has catapulted the Chicks into orbit since its release in August 2002. Though following on the heels of an unpleasant label dispute earlier last year, Home broke all boundaries by flying straight in at number one on the pop album charts in America. This made it the largest selling first week for any artist in the United States in 2002, including Eminem. 1806-1900 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Opens the phone lines to talk to listeners about issues and stories that may have been overlooked or underreported in the last few weeks of war coverage 1825-2115 *BBCR3 OPERA ON 3: Opera On 3: Madam Butterfly. Puccini's searing drama of betrayed innocence tells the story of a young [BEWARE OF geisha girl who gives up her family and religion to marry a SPOILER] feckless young American who promptly abandons his child bride for a more suitable wife back home. The character of Madam Butterfly is the most rounded of Puccini's frail heroines and in her tragic suicide she finds a strength of character that tugs at the heart strings. Antonio Pappano conducts this new Royal Opera House production from the team of Patrice Caurier and Moshe Leiser. Presented by Iain Burnside. [live with interval feature about insect butterflies] 1900-1945 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: The Emerging MInd. Phantoms In The Brain: Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003. The exploration of neurological curiosities reveals startling facts about our brain 1906-2000 *NPR Talk of the Nation with Neal Conan (Hour One): "Rules of War." News of civilian deaths in Iraq forces the question: Are US troops living up to the highest standards of the rules of war. Join Neal Conan for a look at what are the rules of war and are there any rules of occupation? % 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Living In The City: In the first of these two programmes, Alun Lewis will explore the social engineering of towns and cities. What do you need to think about in order to build up a town from scratch? How do you integrate people with amenities in order to get the most efficient system? He compares new towns, like Milton Keynes, which are up for expansion with old cities like Glasgow, who went through a disastrous re-planning scheme after the war and which is only now coming right. From the past and present to exploring future planning ideas, Alun also finds out if the concepts from Sci-fi films will ever be a reality. Will we whiz around the skies of our cities in remote controlled cars? And will living on-top of one another, with a constant buzz of traffic past your 35th floor window really be less stressful than city living is today? 2006-2059 *NPR Talk of the Nation: From chapped hands and sunburn, to fatigue and psychological trauma, modern war makes demands on modern medicine. Join Neal Conan after two on Talk of the Nation for a look at new technology, old fixes, and how the growing role of women is changing health care for the entire army % 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Charlie Gillett Without Frontiers: second in an eight-part series playing an eclectic selection of music on a particular theme. In this edition, street songs with music from Merle Haggard 2106-2200 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: We talk to Washington Post foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid, who is currently reporting from Bagdad. Shadid has covered the Middle East for many years and was even shot by Israeli troops in Ramallah while covering a story last year. He is the author of "Legacy of the Prophet: Despots, Democrats, and the New Politics of Islam." 2206-2300 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Harper's Magazine editor Lewis Lapham joins Kathleen Dunn today after three. Lapham will discuss his recent article questioning the Bush Administration's war policy. Guest: Lewis Lapham, editor Harper's Magazine "CAUSE FOR DISSENT: Ten Questions for the Bush Regime" Harper's April issue 2306-2400 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Language laced with religious overtones to justify war is a dangerous ploy – and one being used by President Bush – So says Kathleen Dunn's guest Elaine Pagels (Pay-gulls) Prof. Of Religion PRINCETON UNIVERSITY "The Origin of Satan" UT THU APRIL 3 THURSDAYS Guinea Anniversary of the Second Republic India (Uttar Pradesh) Cheti Chand; Switzerland Fahrtsfest St. Sixtus I 0100-0200 *WCPN The Arts as an Economic Engine for Northeast Ohio: "The Business of Art": In this first program of a four-part series on the arts, guest panelists Greg Stoup, Joan Perch, Jules Belkin and David Demming discuss how the arts are affecting the area's economy. Questions for discussion include: Are the arts an industry, or a cluster of industries in Northeast Ohio? Do they provide an important component of livability and workforce attraction as we look at models for building a new economy? The program is presented as part of the ongoing Making Change series, and will include an introduction by ideastream's Julie Henry. 0100-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: Violinist Maxim Vengerov in a recital of solo violin music from three different eras 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Everyone agrees that lying is, generally, a bad thing to do. But it's actually difficult to figure out what's really wrong with it! Philosophers Michael Blake, Samantha Brennan, Arthur Ripstein and Ideas host Paul Kennedy tell the truth about lying [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0300-0400 *KQED RADIO SPECIALS: The Homefront continues 0305-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: RICHARD SCHICKEL ON MOVIE WAR: The great British actor Peter Ustinov once said, "Thanks to the movies, gunfire has always sounded unreal to me, even when being fired at." In that same spirit, RICHARD SCHICKEL remembers his childhood and the legacy of World War II films in his new memoir Good Morning, Mr. Zip Zip Zip: Movies, Memory, and World War II. The Time Magazine movie critic for many years, Schickel is one of the leading scholars in the history of American film. Tonight, following Cubs baseball, we will be examining, through the lens of his long career, and a number of film clips, the portrayal of historical events and how they shape our popular culture 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: "The Global Condition." Six million of us earthlings now feel that we are increasingly and inextricably bound to each other in many dimensions: environment, economics, culture and the genomics of our global species. Yet at the same time, lopsided measures of wealth and tools, toys and power, and the politics of global terror threaten to wedge us further apart. In this hour: noted development economist Jeffrey Sachs, novelists Zadie Smith and Colin Channer, and architect Tay Kheng Soon. 0400-XXXX *KING LIVE BY GEORGE: Northwest Chamber Orchestra broadcast concert. Haydn's Concerto for Cello in C Major, Chamber Music No. 3 for Cello & String Orchestra "Nocturnal Dances of Don Juanquixote" by Sallinin and Bizet/Schehedrin: Carmen Suite. Ralf Gothoni, conductor, Arto Noras cello 0406-0500 *WPRi The Connection: War and the words used to describe it. Euphemisms on the Euphrates 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Topic: Geneva Convention. Guest: Prof. Ken Anderson, American University. Geneva Convention relative to the Treatment of Prisoners of War was adopted on 12 August 1949 by the Diplomatic Conference for the Establishment of International Conventions for the Protection of Victims of War. It entered into force 21 October 1950. We will discuss the convention and whether or not Iraq will comply % 1900-1930 *BBCR4 What If...? The Russians Got To The Moon First? Professor Chris Andrew considers some possible scenarios had the Soviet Union beaten the United States to the moon 1905-XXXX *BBCR3 PERFORMANCE ON 3: Bruch`s rarely heard 3rd Violin Concerto... 1930-2000 *BBCWS One Planet: The Nature Of Islands: A fascinating exploration of the Galapagos Islands' ecosystems 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Costing The Earth: Saving The Everglades: Tom Feilden asks if an eight billion dollar plan can save America's wettest wilderness from Florida's rapacious developers 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Mark Lamarr's Shake, Rattle & Roll: Mark pays tribute to the Ladies of Rock 'n' Roll including, Linda Hopkins, Edna McGriff, Jackie Whitley and Patsy Holcomb. The rock 'n' roll "Four In A Row" is devoted to male/female duets 2000-2300 *WFMU Ian Christe, author of "Sound of the Beast: The Complete Headbanging History of Heavy Metal" on Diane's Kamikaze Fun Machine. Author Ian Christe will appear on Diane's Kamikaze Fun Machine to discuss heavy metal (and, of course, his book!) Ian is a former WFMU DJ, so expect to hear lots of oddities, rarities, & surprises! 2030-2100 *BBCR3 Night Waves: Landmarks: Philip Dodd launches a new strand in which writers, artists, film-makers and musicians discuss in depth one of the great cultural landmarks. Guests discuss The Third Man, Carol Reed's stylish collaboration with Graham Greene exploring social, economic and moral corruption in post- war Vienna. Starring Orsen Welles, the film features a memorable score by Anton Karas ("he'll have you in a dither with his zither") and Oscar winning cinematography from Robert Krasker 2100-2130 *BCBR2 Jammin': Rowland Rivron presents the musical panel show with a difference. Just five friends in the garage who are passionate about music. Listen out for Gabrielle singing 'I Am A Cider Drinker'. 2106-2200 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: We talk with Washington Post foreign correspondent Anthony Shadid, who is currently in Baghdad. Shadid has covered the Middle East for years and is the author of "Legacy of the Prophet: Despots, Democrats, and the New Politics of Islam." 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Guest discusses why war is inevitable in a world where the strongest countries seek greater power at each other`s expense. Guest: John Mearsheimer, R. Wendell Harrison Distinguished Service Professor and the co-director of the Program on International Security Policy at the University of Chicago and author of several books, including, "The Tragedy of Great Power Politics" 2306-2400 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: The Bush military doctrine will lead to a more violent world with the United States committing the violence – according to a professor from the Naval Postgraduate School, David Tucker, Associate Professor of Defense Analysis NAVAL POSTGRADUATE SCHOOL, "Skirmishes at the Edge of Empire: The United States and International Terrorism" UT FRI APRIL 4 FRIDAYS Angola Day of Peace and Reconciliation Lesotho Heroes Day; Senegal Independence Day St. Isidore of Seville 0030-XXXX *WABE Between the Lines: Virginia Holman: Rescuing Patty Hearst: Memories from a Decade Gone Mad. In May 1974, one year after Patty Hearst and her captors robbed Hibernia National Bank, a second kidnapping took place. Virginia Holman's mother, in the thrall of her first psychotic episode, believing she had been inducted into a secret army, took her two daughters to the family cottage on the Virginia Peninsula, painted the windows black, and set up the house as a field hospital. Rescuing Patty Hearst is an account of the dark days during which Holman's family was held hostage by her mother's delusions and the country was beset by the folly of the Watergate era. It is a startling memoir and a moving portrait of a young woman defined by her mother's illness-- until at last she rekindles a family love that had lost its way 0100-0300 *CBCR2 In Performance: The St. Lawrence String Quartet invites the group's former cellist, Marina Hoover, to join them in a concert from the Jane Mallett Theatre in Toronto. The program includes works by Part and Bartok plus the world premiere of a work titled Solace, by Melissa Hui 0100-0400 *WUOT Rossini: La Cenerentola. Knoxville Opera Company. Recorded April 12, 2002 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Part One of Spy Story. We are fascinated by the world of secret agents and counterintelligence. Our own spies are heroes fighting a secret war so that the rest of us can sleep soundly; those who spy for our enemies are traitors. What makes a spy? And these days, whom do you spy on when you're not sure who the enemy is? Philip Coulter goes spying [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 *MichR THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: Conventional wisdom holds that humans have been cooking food for about half a million years. Dr. Richard Wrangham pegs it closer to TWO million. He says cooking has shaped the very nature of our species, and he explains how. 0200-0300 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: In recent months, members of the Louisville Metro Council have heard numerous complaints from citizens who oppose adult bookstores that have opened in new locations throughout Jefferson County. Recently, a federal judge ruled that the Metro Council could not enforce its adult-entertainment ordinance, citing that it is unconstitutional. The council has now approved an emergency measure to try to make the existing adult-entertainment law constitutional. In addition, it has approved a resolution to study the law over the next four months in an effort to propose legislation to regulate the business 0300-0400 *KQED RADIO SPECIALS: The Homefront continues 0305-0500 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE FUTURE OF CAPITALISM: Critics of market capitalism have flourished in political and academic circles for centuries. Herbert Marcuse tried to dampen some of the enthusiasm, arguing, "Not every problem someone has with his girlfriend is necessarily due to the capitalist mode of production." Nevertheless, from the WTO protesters to the lingering remnants of socialism, the critiques continue. Our guests tonight, RAGHURAM RAJAN and LUIGI ZINGALES, both accomplished professors at the University of Chicago's Graduate School of Business, come not as critics but as advisers. Their new book Saving Capitalism from the Capitalists: Unleashing the Power of Financial Markets to Create Wealth and Spread Opportunity endorses free markets as the key to prosperity for all. The dangers, they argue, lie in regulation and the tyranny of special interest favors. We will examine the future of capitalism, and take a hard look at our current economic situation, with these two distinguished guests 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: As US troops move forward to Baghdad, The Connection takes a look back in time at America's relationship with Iraq. From Saddam Hussein's rise to power, to the Iran-Iraq conflict, to the Persian Gulf 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: NPR News Special: Supreme Court Arguments on Affirmative Action Rulings. If you know someone looking to get into college anytime soon, how they get in may soon change as the US Supreme Court has its first look at the University of Michigan's Affirmative Action lawsuits. A special report about arguments before the High Court. 0400-0500 *OPB City Arts & Lectures: Steve Martin and Bob Osserman 1400-1430 *BBCR4 Changing Places: Talking Rubbish: Take thousands of tonnes of cardboard and wood from steelworks in Sheffield. Add wool sludge from the textile industry. Mix together with vast quantities of the city's garden waste. Place in a giant warehouse. When composted sell the lot. This week Steve Chalke meets Graham Wiles of the Green Business network, who loves talking rubbish, and who has just launched this new scheme which is reducing landfill, recycling waste and reclaiming the talents of the longterm unemployed 1400-1700 *WFMU Alan Lomax special: on Give the Drummer Some with Doug Schulkind, Doug Schulkind welcomes back Matt Barton from the Alan Lomax archives. Doug and Matt will survey the lastest round of releases from the Rounder label's astonishing series of reissues comprising the entire recordings archive produced and collected by the late, great people's music visionary Alan Lomax 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: Stars, Bars And Blighty: With President Bush 'huntin' down' terrorists and 'smokin' 'em out', what's next for the great Atlantic language chasm? [Rptd Sunday 1930] 1530-1600 *KUNM University Showcase, "Using Communications to Resolve Conflict." Our guest will be Dr. John G. Oetzel, Associate Professor, Department of Communication and Journalism. Dr. Oetzel studies the effects of culture and cultural diversity on group and organizational communication (especially conflict). His work includes such areas as: cross-cultural comparison of face/facework in conflict in four national cultures; people mistreatment in a culturally diverse organization; barriers and interventions for breast cancer screening by older Hispanic women; and pathways to care for mental health by Native American women. Hosted by Jane Blume and produced by Dick Frederiksen 1530-1600 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: Part One of a two-part special look at Quebeckers' attitudes toward war. Poll after poll shows Quebec is the province most opposed to the war in Iraq. And the giant peace rallies in Montreal seem to support the statistics. Yet Quebeckers are joining the Canadian Armed Forces in greater numbers than people from almost any other province [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1600-1700 *WSUI Iowa Talks [non]Live from the Java House: Severe Weather Phobia: The Tornadoes: Springtime means severe weather. Spring is a time of intense, debilitating fear for those with severe weather phobia. Dr. John Westefeld, the author of a study on severe weather phobia, describes his work with sufferers of the disorder. Jesus Flores, creator of the website "stormphobia.org", and KGAN meteorologist Dave Towne also join the discussion. Music by The Tornadoes. This is an archive edition and there will be no live event 1606-1700 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: Find out how the town of Oaxaca (wah-HA-kah), Mexico, successfully repulsed McDonalds and preserved their regional fried grasshoppers. Jean Feraca talks with a Mexican American chef who runs a cooking school in the heart of rural Mexico. Guest: Susana Trilling, a chef and the owner of Seasons of My Heart Cooking School in Oaxaca, Mexico. Author of "Seasons of My Heart" (Ballantine) companion to the PBS series [repeat at 0406; hope they make contact this time] 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Forensic Anthropology: Guests: Doug Owsley, Anthropologist, Smithsonian Institution; Jeff Benedict, Author of "NO BONES UNTURNED" -- Doug Owsley has worked for the FBI, CIA and the State Department solving mysteries that only the bones of hundreds of victims could provide the evidence for. We will find out how this work is done and whether it will be used in this latest war 1800-1830 *BBCR2 Midnight Train To Georgia: Every Beat Of My Heart: Des'ree, one of Britain's best-loved singer-songwriters takes us on a four week evening train journey back to Georgia, to celebrate the music and the amazing life of Gladys Knight. The opening programme concentrates on family and tells the story of the early years, the talent contest, the name 'the Pips', and the start of commercial success at Motown. One of the great soul singers, Gladys Knight was a performer from her childhood years, forming the Pips with her brother Merald and cousins. They made the top ten in 1961 with the heavily doo wop-influenced 'Every Beat of My Heart', and recorded some fine, nowadays overlooked, pop-soul sides for the Fury and Maxx labels in the early and mid-'60s, sometimes under the direction of songwriter Van McKoy. They had several minor hits during this period, 'Letter Full of Tears' and 'Giving Up', made the Top 40. They were continually gigging across the United States. By the time they moved to Motown, Gladys Knight and her Pips were seasoned entertainers 1800-XXXX *KPBS SUPREME COURT & AFFIRMATIVE ACTION: A "KPBS PRESENTS" SPECIAL: On Tuesday, the Supreme Court released audio of the oral arguments in the University of Michigan affirmative action case. The case is five years in the making and the outcome will shape the way all future generations of college applicants either get in or stay out of school. This was only the second time in its history that the Supreme Court has released the audio of arguments on the same day the arguments were presented (the first time being Bush v Gore). This shows the Court's opinion of how compelling and vital for the nation this issue is. Franks Stasio hosts this NPR News special. Nina Totenberg joins him in the studio 1807-XXXX *WUOT FIRST FRIDAY REQUESTS & NEW RELEASES 2100-2130 *BBCR2 The Music Never Ends: The Michel Legrand Story. Part 2. You Must Believe In Spring: David Jacobs presents a six-part profile of composer and pianist Michel Legrand. 'Les Parapluies de Cherbourg' (Umbrellas of Cherbourg) is considered one of Legrand's best works as a composer, written when he was still a struggling artist in Paris. It was the first movie musical where everything was sung by the actors, led by Catherine Deneuve. Today, with Broadway musicals like 'Miss Saigon', 'Les Miserables', and 'Evita', everyone accepts sung dialogue on stage as well as on the big screen. But 'Cherbourg' was shot in 1964 when it was considered a revolutionary idea. In this programme, Legrand recalls the challenging time he and lyricist/ director Jacques Demy went through to get the movie made 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Musician Bethany Yarrow joins Kathleen Dunn to discuss how to protest the war through music and activism. Guest: Bethany Yarrow, singer, musician, daughter of Peter Yarrow 2200-2230 *BBCR4 Great Lives: Captain Robert Scott: The biographical series Great Lives returns for a new run of ten programmes, beginning this week with Beryl Bainbridge nominating her dead hero, Robert Falcon Scott. Scott's defeat by the Norwegian Amundsen in the race to the South Pole, and his failure to bring his men back alive, have caused frequent re-workings of his reputation. This stern, unbending naval man appears to represent many of the failings of old imperial Britain. But from her research for her novel "The Birthday Boys", Beryl Bainbridge believes she unearthed a different man, an adventurer and a romantic, whose eyes turned from blue to purple whenever he became amorous. As well as rare archive of Scott's companions on his southerly trips, the programme contains accounts of his love for the bohemian sculptor, Katherine Bruce, and evidence of his friendship with JM Barrie, creator of Peter Pan. The idea for the Lost Boys, Bainbridge believes, came from Scott. Bob Headland, archivist of the Scott Polar Institute provides the cooler evidence, including an account of the numerous mistakes Scott made, while Humphrey Carpenter will be keeping the expert and the nominator apart should a scrap break out 2306-2400 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: Did Peter Arnett deserve to be fired for what he said in an interview on Iraqi TV? That's one question Dave Berkman and his guest media ethicist will address. Guest: Bob Steele, ethics group leader THE POYNTER INSTITUTE FOR MEDIA STUDIES UT SAT APRIL 5 SATURDAYS Hong Kong, Taiwan Tomb-Sweeping Day (Ching Ming or Qingming Festival) Buddhism (Vajrayana) Andhra Pradesh, Nepal Dr. Babu Jagjivan Ram's Birthday Hinduism Korea South Day of Trees; St. Vincent Ferrer 0100-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: From the Winspear Centre in Edmonton, two renowned jazz virtuosi and long-time musical collaborators - Belgian harmonica player Toots Thielemans and American pianist Kenny Werner - offer their unique interpretations of jazz, pop and classical standards 0105-0200 *CBCR1 IDEAS: In 1932, a Communist official in Western Siberia sent a letter to Moscow enclosing a report on hunger in the villages. It described peasants subsisting on "food substitutes," hollow-eyed children with swollen bellies, and a worker who "is starting to slip into psychosis due to starvation." University of Toronto historian Robert Johnson revisits the Stalin era in the light of discoveries made since the archives on Soviet history were opened [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-0300 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: The term, green architecture, is used to describe economical, energy-saving, environmentally-friendly, sustainable development. Join the conversation Friday as we explore the relationship between architecture and ecology, and discuss how you can use concepts of green design in your own home 0200-0300 *WCNY Cinemusic with Chuck Klaus: THE TWO WORLDS OF GULLIVER. During the hour, scores by two fine cinema composers celebrating Johanathan Swift's Everyman-on-the-go. We'll hear selections from Victor Young's charming score for the Max Fleischer animated film, and we'll sample Bernard Herrmann's great music for the Ray Harryhausen special effects opus "The Three Worlds of Gulliver." 0206-0300 *CAINAN FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: In the late 1990s a group of eight women in Iran met secretly each week to read and talk about books – the forbidden literature of the west. They read Pride and Prejudice, Washington Square, and Lolita. We talk with Azar Nafisi who led the group and wrote about it in the new memoir, "Reading Lolita in Tehran." 0206-0300 *KUSP FRESH AIR as above 0206-0300 *KALW FRESH AIR as above 0306-0400 *WBUR THE CONNECTION: Drawing the News: On the eve of the Pulitzer announcements, a conversation with award-winning political cartoonists on translating headlines into images and the power of the pen when art and politics collide 0306-0400 *KWMU CONNEXION as above 0300-0400 *KQED ON THE HOME FRONT 0400-0500 *KQED Commonwealth Club: John Kerry, US Senator (D-Mass.) and author of "The New War: The Web of Crime that Threatens America's Security." Based on information he gathered as chairman and ranking Democrat on the Subcommittee on Terrorism, Narcotics, and International Operations, Kerry tells us how crime has become "globalized" and gives us an overview of the newest generation of criminals who threaten America - the Italian Mafia, the Russian mobs, the Japanese yakuza, the Chinese triads, and the Colombian cartels 0406-0500 *WPRi All About Food with Jean Feraca: Find out how the town of Oaxaca (wah-HA-kah), Mexico, successfully repulsed McDonalds and preserved their regional fried grasshoppers. Jean Feraca talks with a Mexican American chef who runs a cooking school in the heart of rural Mexico. Guest: Susana Trilling, a chef and the owner of Seasons of My Heart Cooking School in Oaxaca, Mexico. Author of "Seasons of My Heart" (Ballantine) companion to the PBS series [hope they make contact this time] 0500-0600 *KUNM Afropop Worldwide. "Carnival 2003!" takes you to the streets of Port of Spain, Trinidad and Salvador da Bahia, Brazil for the annual pre-Lenten extravaganzas of music, musical stories, street theater, and scandal. Find out who won the Trinny people's choice — the Road March. What did the always clever, topical Calypsonians have to say about current affairs in the Middle East? And enjoy the carnival songs blasted from the trio electricos mounted on huge trucks trolling through exuberant crowds in Salvador da Bahia. Non-stop party, here we come 0600-0700 *KQED Forum with Friday Forum host Angie Coiro: Forum marks the 125th anniversary of Berkeley with a discussion of the city's history. Guests: Gray Brechin, historian and author whose books include "Imperialist San Francisco: Urban Power, Earthly Ruin"; Richard Schwartz, Berkeley resident and author of "Berkeley 1900: What Daily Life was Like at the Turn of the Century as Told by Local Newspaper Articles"; Karen Hata, third generation Berkeley resident; and Reginald E. Zelnik, professor of history at UC Berkeley and author of "The Free Speech Movement: Reflections on Berkeley in the 1960s." 1200-1300 *BBCR3 World Routes: Lucy Duran visits the Garifuna people of Belize, and joins in their annual Settlement Day festival, a noisy celebration re-enacting the arrival of their ancestors on the coast of Central America 1230-1300 *BBCR2 Jammin': Presented by Rowland Rivron, Jammin' is a unique radio show. Each week we form a five piece band, made up of comedians and musicians who literally jam together within a format that allows them to improvise and riff off each other. The backline is always made up of Rowland Rivron (Drums), Dave Catlin Birch (Bass) and Richard Vranch (keyboards). They are joined by recording artistes such as the Icicle Works' Ian McNab, Blacks' Colin Vearncombe and arguably the world's most famous session musician Herbie Flowers. There are also a number of very talented comedians who can also play a bit, including perrier award winner Justin Edwards, former lounge crooner Lenny Beige aka Steve Furst and the vocal chameleon that is Jason Wood. They make musical worlds collide on a week to week basis. Imagine Marilyn Manson covering the Everly Brothers "Dream" or Gabrielle singing "I Am A Cider Drinker." Part One: If you'd like to hear Gabrielle sing "I Am A Cider Drinker", the Bhundu Boys cover of Donna Summer's "I Feel Love" or fancy a very lively night of live music then join Rowland Rivron and guests this week 1505-1600 *CBCR1 Grooveshinny, CBC Radio One's new musical quiz show, celebrates the spirit and excitement of Juno weekend with a one-hour special. Host Brent Bambury welcomes special guest Emm Gryner (nominee, Best Pop Album), plus cameos by Shawn Desman (Best New Artist) and Fred Penner (Best Children's Recording), and a special performance by Ottawa-based trio The Empiricals. Dominion carilloneur Gordon Slater will also participate, ringing the bells of the Ottawa Peace Tower in an unprecedented game of Name That Tune [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1605-1700 *CBCR1 Quirks and Quarks: The Search for SARS: how medical researchers are scrambling to find the pathogen responsible for the current outbreak, and why public health officials are using this challenge as a dress rehearsal for something much more deadly: a pandemic of influenza [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1730-1830 *BBCR3 Schubert: Vanbrugh Quartet: Recorded in the Pittville Pump Room as part of the 2001 Cheltenham Festival, the Vanbrugh Quartet play Schubert's Quartet for Strings in G major (D.887) 1900-2000 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: The Queue: James Maw presents a radio portrait of the queue for the Lying In State of the Queen Mother on the final night before her funeral, a year ago this week. The programme draws on James's interviews with people in the queue, plus extracts from the broadcast archive. It includes memories and reflections on the event as its first anniversary approaches 1950-2010 *MORN MET OPERA INTERMISION FEATURE [time approx.] 2115-2200 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: The Emerging Mind: Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003. The exploration of neurological curiosities reveals startling facts about our brains [Rpt of Wed 1900] 2200-2300 *KQED Soundprint: Segment One: "Challenging Stereotypes." Traditionally, Hull, in northeast England, has had a tiny ethnic community numbering some 300 Chinese, so there was considerable suspicion when the local council agreed to accept around 250 Iraqi Kurds, under the British government's dispersal program. In fact between 1,500 and 3000 arrived in the city, as a result of a deal by private landlords. Initially there were incidents of violence and racial abuse, even today there are occasional attacks. But despite lingering prejudice, there is a growing acceptance of these refugees and asylum-seekers. Segment Two: "Greetings from White Australia." In the closets of many suburban homes lurk some of the strangest representations of Aboriginal people and culture - chubby piccaninnies, reclining dusky nudes, bearded warriors - on everything from tea towels to ashtrays. This mass-produced Aboriginalia we now call kitsch UT SUN APRIL 6 SUNDAYS Rwanda Genocide Commemoration Day Sudan Uprising Day; Thailand Chakri Dynasty Day Turkmenistan parliamentary elections; DST begins in N. America 0300-0400 *WSHU ON THE MEDIA: How Christian fundamentalist fiction has primed millions of Americans for the war in Iraq 0300-0600 *WUOT Puccini: Suor Angelica. Rossini: Il Signor Bruschino. Knoxville Opera Company 0400-0500 *WHYY AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: In this program with host Georges Collinet, we check in on highlands finger-pickers, salegy pop guitarists in the north, and wild and wooly tsapika guitarists in the south. We'll also hear from some of the guitar's string-instrument cousins in Madagascar: the valiha, the marovany and the kabosy. String Magic from Madagascar 0900-1000 *CBK 25TH HOUR IN SASKATCHEWAN NON-DST SPECIAL % 1130-1200 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Butter: Sheila Dillon celebrates butter in all its forms, from ghee and smeun to buttermilk and beurre blanc. [Rptd Monday 1500] 1500-1600 *WUOT ST. MARK PASSION 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Brian Kay's Light Programme: Dmitri Tiomkin's Hollywood version of Strauss' Blue Danube; the Queen's Hall Light Orchestra and Sidney Torch play Haydn Wood's Snapshots of London; and Joseph Horovitz takes us back to the 19th century music hall with the help of the Philip Jones Brass Ensemble. 1600-1640 *BBCR4 The Caste Divide: An investigation into a hidden form of social hierarchy taking hold in Britain today, the Indian caste system. For many of the nearly one million Britons of Indian origin the caste system continues to exert a powerful influence over their everyday lives. Yet it's a subject many feel is still taboo. BBC Community Affairs reporter Naresh Puri hears the stories of some of the estimated 20,000 'untouchables' living in Britain, and from those who still believe in the virtues of caste. He finds out whether tradition can merge with a modern British identity, when it comes to the caste system 1600-1645 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Stephen Johnson explores the American composer Aaron Copland's Symphony No. 3, which was largely composed during the latter years of the Second World War, and finds that it is a work strongly affected by the time in which it was written. The specially recorded examples are performed by the BBC Philharmonic, conducted by Jason Lai 1600-1700 *KGOU Audio of Supreme Court Arguments on Affirmative Action Case: The Affirmative Action lawsuit stemming from the University of Michigan's admissions policy has nationwide implications...The case is 5 years in the making and the outcome will shape the way future generations of college applicants either get in or stay out of school. We'll offer a special report from NPR News featuring Tuesday's arguments before the US Supreme Court. It's an extensive look at both sides of the case 1645-1730 *BBCR3 The Sunday Feature: The John Tusa Interview: Series of conversations with some of the world's greatest artistic originators. This week John meets the painter, teacher and father of Brit Art, Michael Craig-Martin 1700-1800 *KGOU Oklahoma Voices: Governor Brad Henry and Congressman Tom Cole: U.S. Congressman Tom Cole is settling into his position as a freshman legislator, taking the place of J.C. Watts. He worked as a consultant for high-ranking conservative Republican candidates such as former President Ronald Reagan and the current president, George W Bush. Governor Brad Henry dug into his new position quickly because the state is facing its largest financial shortfall in history. Heather Spencer interviews both Mr. Cole and Mr. Henry on their offices and lives as they begin new eras in politics. Cole will discuss his experience as a political consultant and how it helps his current job. Henry speaks of his family and his plans for a fiscal turnaround for education by way of a lottery and using Rainy Day funds for emergency help to the state Medicaid program 1700-1800 *WUGA Broadway Revisited host Art Hilgart presents the best of Broadway, both past and present. Moby! The lost musical version of Moby Dick and other Broadway rarities (postponed from March 30) 1700-1800 *KUNM A Meeting of Minds. Let's talk about beauty. I'd like to ask you: What role does beauty play in your life? What kind of beauty moves you most, and what impact has the experience of beauty ever had on you? Is beauty just in the eye of the beholder or how is beauty to be understood? What does it mean that we humans are creatures that experience beauty? Hosted by Andy Schmookler 1700-1800 *WKNO SMART CITY: Culture of Fear: Dr. Barry Glasser, author of "Culture of Fear: Why Americans Are Afraid of the Wrong Things," and Dr. Dave Norton, vice president, Research and Experience Strategy, Yamamoto Moss 1900-1930 *BBCR4 A World In Your Ear: Emily Buchanan and Fi Glover unfurl another stunning selection of aural blooms from the best of English language radio around the world. In the first episode of the series, Emily Buchanan interviews Haitian radio journalist Michelle Montas. Michelle and her husband Jean Dominique set up the independent Radio Haiti during the regime of Papa Doc. After enduring harassment throughout the Duvalier years, Jean was gunned down in the radio station's courtyard last April. He died, and Michelle continues to be harassed, under a democratic system for which they had campaigned so long to establish [Rpt of Friday 1230] 1900-XXXX *WQXR WQXR Live at The New York Botanical Garden: Can you believe there is a place in New York City that makes you feel as if you are on a tropical island? It's The New York Botanical Garden, home of some of the most exquisite species of plants and flowers. The New York Botanical Garden is located at Bronx River Parkway and Fordham Road in the Bronx. Once again join WQXR as we present a series of exciting concerts during The New York Botanical Garden 2003 Classical Concert Series. Hosted by WQXR morning man, Gregg Whiteside, the first concert of this series will be this Sunday, April 6th at 3pm. This will be one of three concerts featuring wonderful musical selections of pianist Jung Lin 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: Stars, Bars And Blighty: With President Bush 'huntin' down' terrorists and 'smokin' 'em out', what's next for the great Atlantic language chasm? [Rpt of Friday 1500] 2015-2115 *BBCR3 Smith Quartet: Recorded at the 2001 Cheltenham Festival, the Smith Quartet play Steve Reich's Triple Quartet, Conlon Nancarrow's String Quartet and Reich's Different Trains 2115-2200 *BBCR3 Between The Ears: Shorts: A special Between The Ears showcase for three linked features which evoke different worlds of language, sound, colour and hearing. 1. Listening To Lists: Whispering chains of lists rise and fall from the surface of a feature which investigates how writers, artists and film-makers have used lists in their work. With Peter Greenaway, Don Paterson and Emma Kay. 2. The Colour Of Sound: The composer Jonathan Harvey paints with sound, the painter George Dannatt depicts sound with colour. Peter White, blind since birth, considers his own perception of colour based on sound and music. Woven through their music, sounds and words, a poem by Sean Street moves through darkness and shades of colour towards light and silence. 3. In A Child's Ear: At twenty weeks in the womb, the foetus' ears have formed, and so begins the journey to aural consciousness. In the company of audiologists and poets, In A Child's Ear examines the process by which we learn to make sense of the barrage of sound that greets our ears when we leave the womb 2200-2300 *WBEZ The Whole Wide World (PRI): Part four of a seven-part series decoding the riddles of globalism 2200-2300 *WGBH The Whole Wide World, Part 4: cellist Yo-Yo Ma searches for the roots of musical expression 2300-2400 *WBEZ Speaking of Faith: Religion in a Time of War (Minnesota Public Radio): More than any crisis in modern memory, the War on Terror — including the current U.S. military presence in Iraq — is being debated in religious, usually Christian, terms. Speaking of Faith will explore the nuances of that debate with a former war correspondent, a political theorist, and a renowned preacher 2300-2400 *CAINAN 7PM: The Changing World: Blockbusters, Burgers and Bluejeans I UT MON APRIL 7 MONDAYS Mozambique Womens' Day Armenia Day of Mother and Beauty; Gypsies, Rom Nation's Day Moldova (Republic of) Interethnic Reconciliation Day Blessed Hermann Joseph 0000-0100 *WBEZ Special: Supreme Court Affirmative Action Case Hosted by Frank Stasio with Nina Totenberg 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILES: Tony Hillerman: Mystery writer, Tony Hillerman, has been a farmer, soldier, journalist, university professor and administrator. However, he is best known for his many novels based in the American Southwest and focusing on American Indian culture. Join us for an hour-long interview courtesy of KQED in San Francisco 0000-0100 *CAINAN Whole Wide World with Christopher Lydon: Environmental Exhaustion 0100-0200 *WNYCf MAD ABOUT MUSIC, monthly, expected % 0100-0200 *CAINAN The History of Iraq 0100-0200 *WFIU Freedom: Music From The Heart Of America: Narrated by NPR®'s Alex Chadwick, Freedom: Music From The Heart Of America is a one-hour journey through the history of this country, exploring the idea of freedom - how different types of Americans have defined it, how it has been fought for and struggled over, and how it has been expanded and redefined in ways that the Founding Fathers could not have foreseen or imagined. This program features the insights and stories of noted historian Eric Foner, journalist and historian Joy Hakim (author of "Freedom: A History Of Us"), legendary folksinger and activist Pete Seeger, and musician, scholar and civil rights veteran Bernice Johnson Reagon (founder of the group Sweet Honey In The Rock). And there is plenty of music, all of it taken from a new collection available from Columbia/ Legacy Recordings. The artists featured in this program include: Keb' Mo' The Washington Men's Camerata Gene Autry Verdell Primeaux Dan Zanes Suzanne Vega Gid Tanner's Skillet Lickers Taj Mahal The Mormon Tabernacle Choir The Almanac Singers Billie Holiday The Freedom Singers Sweet Honey In The Rock Mahalia Jackson 0100-0400 *WNYCa Radio Lab: Educating Esme: Think back to fifth grade. Did you torture your teacher? I bet you did. This hour, Radio Lab travels back to fifth grade, this time through the eyes and ears of a teacher. Educating Esme: During her first year teaching fifth grade at a Chicago Public school, Esme Cordell kept a journal. That journal became "Educating Esme," a collections of musings on the joys and frustrations of public [all 3 hours??] 0130-0200 *WBEZ CAPITOL STEPS APRIL FOOL SPECIAL POLITICS TAKES A HOLIDAY 0200-0300 *RFPI NEW DIMENSIONS: THE POWER OF ALTERNATIVE MEDIA with NINA UTNE and JAY WALLJASPER [+6/12 hours] 0200-0300 *CAINAN How Long's Trane Been Gone, John Coltrane II 0200-0300 *KUSP Remarkable Radio: This week the U.S. Supreme Court began to consider a landmark case on affirmative action. NPR special program on the case from the University of Michigan. The program includes rare audio of the Supreme Court justices discussing the case. For more on this issue, tune in to Deanna Zachary's Talk of the Bay Tuesday the 8th at 1700 UT. How has the University of California system handled admissions of a diverse student population, and how might the Supreme Court decision affect UC admission policy? 0200-0300 *WFIU ST. MARK PASSION 0200-0300 *WOIa Speaking of Faith: Religion in a Time of War: More than any crisis in modern memory, the War on Terror - including the current U.S. military presence in Iraq - is being debated in religious, usually Christian terms. This timely special will explore the nuances of that debate with a former war correspondent, a political theorist, and a renowned preacher. As President Bush draws on his faith to guide decisions about war, Speaking of Faith asks how and whether Christian principles really make a difference at this moment in our national life. And if they don't make a difference, why not? 0300-0330 *WOIa Humankind: In this documentary, history filmmaker Ken Burns, philosopher Jacob Needleman and others examine the genius of our country's Founders and how they intended American freedom as a way to protect an individual's right to obey the dictates of his or her own conscience. Recorded at Jefferson's Monticello, Independence Hall in Philadelphia and elsewhere; plus beautiful period music 0400-0500 *WYSO Children of War: Fighting, Dying, Surviving: Journalist Charlayne Hunter-Gault, a CNN bureau chief and former NPR reporter, hosts this documentary special, which attempts to help Americans focus on the issues involving children and military conflict. Reports take us from Africa to Iraq, the Balkans to Britain and the United States to the sites of battlefronts, refugee camps, and decision makers. We'll learn about groups working to rehabilitate child soldiers and hear how international aid has helped some children rebuild their lives 0500-0600 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Dr. John Barrow, a professor of mathematical sciences at the University of Cambridge. He'll take us from the tiniest atoms to the furthest edge of space, when he when we talk about his book, "The Constants of Nature: From Alpha to Omega - the Numbers That Encode the Deepest Secrets of the Universe." We'll find out how the notion of anything actually being constant has begun to change for scientists everywhere 1430-1500 *BBCWa The Music Feature: The World Music Awards: Charlie Gillett introduces highlights of the planet's leading awards for the fastest-growing musical genre - world music. This event celebrates the variety and quality of some of the best music the world has to offer [NOT: still pre-empted for news] 1500-1530 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Butter: Sheila Dillon celebrates butter in all its forms, from ghee and smeun to buttermilk and beurre blanc 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: Tommy Pearson talks to composer Howard Shore in New York about his collaborations with director David Cronenberg and his work on the epic Lord of the Rings trilogy 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: What happened in Karbala is the topic of conversation on The Connection after ten. Why the murder of a grandson of the Prophet Mohammed, thirteen centuries before American troops set foot in Iraq, may shape what happens when they leave 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Four Corners: Gavin Esler and guests look behind the headlines to the international issues and cultures which shape the world 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Recently, the DEA seized a number of websites selling paraphanalia that could be used to take drugs. Instead of shutting the sites down, the DEA has posted a warning to web surfers visiting the sites. Host John Sandidge asks Lee Tien, staff attorney with the Electronic Frontier Foundation, what this development in DEA procedure might mean for web surfers' privacy & freedom of information. Also, John Laird reports on the week's activity in the state assembly 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): How is America perceived overseas? Forum discusses the war in Iraq and the effect its having on public opinion abroad. Guests: Steven Weber, professor of political science and director of the MacArthur Program on Multilateral Governance at the Institute of International Studies at UC Berkeley; Mark Hertsgaard, journalist and author of "The Eagle's Shadow: Why America Fascinates and Infuriates the World"; Barnett Baron, executive vice president of the Asia Foundation; Eric Farnsworth, vice president of Washington operations at the Council of the Americas; and Jean Abinader, managing director of the Arab American Institute 1830-2030 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: Cardiff Singers Series: This year The BBC Singer of the World Competition celebrates its 20th anniversary. The Finnish soprano, Karita Mattila, was the first winner back in 1982. Her recital of Romantic songs given a couple of days ago at London's Barbican Concert Hall launches a series of broadcasts by former contestants who have since made a mark on the musical world. Presented by Humphrey Burton. [Details in BBCR3 daily listings] 1900-1930 *BBCR4 In The Footsteps Of Moses: Edward Stourton explores the 4000 year history of the Jewish people and traces how the moment God met Moses on Mount Sinai, as described in the book of Exodus, still affects events today 1930-2000 *BBCWa The Music Feature: The World Music Awards: Charlie Gillett introduces highlights of the planet's leading awards for the fastest-growing musical genre - world music. This event celebrates the variety and quality of some of the best music the world has to offer [NOT? still pre-empted for news at 1430] 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: Belgium: Meriel Beattie goes to Antwerp to meet Dyab Abou Jahjah, whose dream is to create a pan-Arab nationalist movement across Europe 2000-2030 *BBCR4 State Of Africa: Last of a three-part series in which Julian Pettifer examines the plight of Africa's wildlife in the face of the continent's human tragedy 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Live From The Stables: A special performance from Craig David singing 'What's your Flava?' with a full big band. Plus, Juliet Roberts and Jamie Cullum. Recorded live at the Stables theatre in Wavendon 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: During World War II, correspondent Ernie Pyle wrote one of the most popular columns about the war following campaigns in North Africa, Italy, Normandy, and Okinawa. On the next Fresh Air, a talk with his biographer James Tobin 2030-2115 *BBCR3 Night Waves: As the British Museum celebrates its 250th birthday with an exhibition investigating the relationship between art and memory, Richard Coles introduces a new series of specially commissioned letters from artists, writers and musicians nominating art whose legacy they would prefer to forget - art they wish had never been made in the first place 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Big Band Special: Stacey Kent presents the second part of concert recorded at the Dorking Halls and featuring the BBC Big Band, conducted by Jiggs Whigham, with vocal harmony group The New York Voices 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: While the war rages on and the economy continues to struggle, Kathleen Dunn opens the phones today after four and asks, "What Are You Doing To Keep A Smile On Your Face? Call in today after four, for the happy face open line UT TUE APRIL 8 TUESDAYS Malaysia Sultan's Anniversary (Johor only) St. Dionysius 0000-0100 *KGOU Audio of Supreme Court Arguments on Affirmative Action Case: The Affirmative Action lawsuit stemming from the University of Michigan's admissions policy has nationwide implications...The case is 5 years in the making and the outcome will shape the way future generations of college applicants either get in or stay out of school. We'll offer a special report from NPR News featuring Tuesday's arguments before the US Supreme Court. It's an extensive look at both sides of the case 0000-0200 *WUOT UNTITLED: Knoxville Symphony/Chamber Orchestra Concerts season begins, ~3 months. KNOXVILLE SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Kirk Trevor, conductor, Midori, violin. IVES/SCHUMAN: Variations on "America"; SIBELIUS: Violin Concerto; MUSSORGSKY/RAVEL: Pictures at an Exhibition 0005-0100 *CBCR1 IDEAS: The Enright Files. Michael Enright, host of The Sunday Edition, speaks with original and influential contemporary thinkers in this monthly Monday night Ideas feature. Tonight, two conversations with Middle East scholar Bernard Lewis, one recorded just after September 11th, and one recorded just after the present war in Iraq began [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0030-0100 *BBCWa The Music Feature: The World Music Awards: Charlie Gillett introduces highlights of the planet's leading awards for the fastest-growing musical genre - world music. This event celebrates the variety and quality of some of the best music the world has to offer [NOT? still pre-empted for news at 1430] 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE MORALITY OF LAUGHTER: Has our society become too serious? Our guest tonight argues that, from politics to academics, Americans have lost their sense of humor; and that, as a society, we take ourselves far too seriously. FRANK BUCKLEY is professor of law at George Mason University and author of the new book The Morality of Laughter. He joins us for a light-hearted discussion of a serious subject 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: During World War II, correspondent Ernie Pyle wrote one of the most popular columns about the war following campaigns in North Africa, Italy, Normandy, and Okinawa. On the next Fresh Air, a talk with his biographer James Tobin 0300-0400 *KQED World Affairs Council: "The Koreans and Their Neighbors: New Threats and Shifting Alliances." Tonight's speaker is Michael H. Armacost, former US Ambassador to Japan and the Philippines, former president of the Brookings Institution. America has called for a multilateral solution to the recent crisis on the Korean Peninsula. As a result, Russia, China and Japan have been asked to play a more active role in contributing to a peaceful resolution. Drawing on years of experience in this region, Ambassador Armacost will provide his insights into this volatile area and prospects for change 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: What happened in Karbala is the topic of conversation on The Connection after ten. Why the murder of a grandson of the Prophet Mohammed, thirteen centuries before American troops set foot in Iraq, may shape what happens when they leave 1230-1300 *BBCR4 Ken Clarke's Jazz Greats: Former chancellor Ken Clarke profiles great jazz musicians of the 20th century. This edition features Miles Davis, who lit the path followed by a succession of hopeful imitators 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Shop Talk: What do politics, weddings and the after-dinner circuit have in common? Find out with Heather Payton and guests as they explore the growing dominance of the professional wordsmith 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Voices: Spotlight On Christa Ludwig: Iain Burnside talks to the great mezzo-soprano about her devotion to the art of Lieder singing and discusses some of her operatic roles including the soprano parts that she took on later in her career. With songs by Brahms, Mahler, Schumann, Schubert and Wolf and extracts from Bellini's Norma and Wagner's Götterdämmerung. 1700-1800 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Ted Turner CEO, Turner Broadcasting [cancelled, at last minute?] 1700-1800 *KUSP TALK OF THE BAY: Deanna Zachary: How has the University of California system handled admissions of a diverse student population, and how might the Supreme Court decision affect UC admission policy? 1730-1800 *BBCR4 My Family And Other Agents: Michael Grade talks about his family and his work, offering an agent's viewpoint of popular entertainers. Featured performers include Judy Garland and Ethel Merman 1800-1900 *BBCR2 Howard Goodall's... ...Classical Connections. Who Pays The Piper: A musical patron is often more than 'the money man' as Beethoven, Tchaikovsky, Ravel and international cellist Steven Isserlis discovered 1900-1940 *BBCR4 Capitalist Punishment: In America, privatised prisons are big business. But can a prison system be run for profit without creating more problems than it solves? Lucy Ash investigates. [Repeated Sun 1600] 2045-2115 *BBCR3 Night Waves: Isabel Hilton separates the myth from the reality surrounding one of the world's most mysterious countries as she talks to Patrick French whose new book explores the complex history of Tibet. There will also be another in Night Waves series of letters responding to the British Museum's new exhibition Art and Memory: Artists, writers and musicians nominate art they would like to forget; art they wish had never been made in the first place, not least for the legacy it left 2306-2400 *WPRi On Point: Ahmed Chalabi has been airlifted into southern Iraq in recent days, prompting fresh speculation that the Pentagon is grooming the leader of one of Iraq's main opposition groups, the Iraqi National Congress, as a future prime minister. A close look at how Chalabi and other Iraqi exiles are readying to mold civil society in post-war Iraq, and work with other countries in doing so. GUESTS: Patrick Clawson, Deputy Director of the Washington Institute for Near East Policy; Dr. Mahdi Al-Bassam Founding Member of the Iraqi National Congress and Member of the Board of Advisors of the Committee for the Liberation of Iraq; Fawaz Gerges, Chair of Middle East and International Affairs at Sarah Lawrence College and author of "America and Political Islam: Clash of Cultures or Clash of Interests." UT WED APRIL 9 WEDNESDAYS Philippines Bataan & Corregidor Heroes Day Tunisia Martyrs' Day; India Mela Bahu Fort (Jammu District only) St. Casilda 0005-0100 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Ideas: Hearth and Dome. Architect Buckminster Fuller designed the geodesic dome as the home of the future. Hippies loved it. But it never really caught on. Adam Norman charts the rise and fall of a utopian ideal [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *WPRi On Point: The men and women who are winning the war in Iraq are young and diverse. But those with their boots on the ground rarely come from the higher eschelons of American society. A look at who's in today's US military, and who's not. GUESTS: Charles Moskos, Professor of Sociology at Northwestern University and author of "The Post-Modern Military: Armed Forces After the Cold War"; Richard Kohn, Professor of Hstory at the University of North Carolina at Chapel Hill and author of "Soldiers and Civilians: The Civil-Military Gap and American National Security." 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE WORLD OF POKER: If you ever travel to Las Vegas, you have the opportunity to play Blackjack, Craps, Roulette, and a number of other "table" games. But poker is left to the side, available to but little noticed by most visitors. Nevertheless, the world of Las Vegas poker is a haven for high- stakes gamblers. And each year, huge poker tournaments are held for million of dollars--with accompanying levels of excess in other areas. One of our guests tonight, JAMES McMANUS, recently covered the World Series of Poker for Harper's Magazine and has written a gripping story in the new book Positively Fifth Street: Murderers, Cheetahs, and Binion's World Series of Poker. We will be discussing the bizarre world of professional poker with McManus and others 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed: The Fingerprint Revolution: Laurie Taylor explores the history of the technique of fingerprinting, the personal identification it offered, and its effect across the British Empire 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM: Sandra Day O'Connor: The Majesty of the Law (Random House) In a new book, Supreme Court Justice Sandra Day O'Connor reveals what she believes matters most in American law. She talks with Diane about the battles women have faced in the legal system and offers solutions to the many challenges currently facing the legal profession, the courts and our jury system 1830-2030 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: Live From The Lighthouse, Poole: Verity Sharp presents an exciting programme given by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra under the inspirational direction of their American Principal Conductor, Marin Alsop. All the music is American or written for performance in the US. A minimalist classic contrasts with the outrageous virtuosity of Rachmaninov's concerto, written for his own US tour. After the interval Aaron Copland's Fanfare for the Common Man is heard, reworked and incorporated into his rarely heard symphony. John Adams: A Short Ride in a Fast Machine; Rachmaninov: Piano Concerto No. 3, Barry Douglas (piano); 1920 Twenty Minutes: Towards Newfoundland The Prow: For hundreds of years Dorset men braved the Atlantic in tiny boats, sailing out of Poole to fish the waters off Newfoundland, some forsaking their homeland forever. Poet Seán Street explores the connection between the County and the Province, and reads his poem on the subject, 'Poole Quay'. 1940 Copland's Symphony No. 3 1900-1945 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: Synapses And The Self: Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003. Tracking the visual pathways with the help of patients who are blind [Rptd Sat, 2115] 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Living In The City: Living in cities is dirty, tiresome and stressful. What can technology do to make life more pleasant, especially when cities are growing bigger and more dirty every day? In the second programme in the series we take a more in depth view of the technologies used today to make city living easier. What happens to all the rubbish we generate and what is the best way to get rid of it? How can you fix the drains without digging up the roads? Alun Lewis goes down a sewer to find out 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: the role of intelligence gathering during wartime – the past and the present. Guest: Thomas Powers, publisher STEERFORTH PRESS "Intelligence Wars: American Secret History from Hitler to Al Qaeda" book available at www.nybooks.com – not currently from amazon.com 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Charlie Gillett Without Frontiers: Charlie Gillett explores how an eclectic selection of artists approach the theme of walking. Featuring The Bangles, The Police, The Staple Singers and Johnny Cash 2230-2300 *CBCR1 Dispatches: Cultural collateral damage: archeologists worry about the treasures of the birthplace of history in post-war Iraq. And in Egypt, even the Pyramids have dropped off the tourists' trail. Also, a classical Iraqi lute virtuoso who says his music speaks louder than words against the war [+1/2/3/4 hours] 2300-2400 *WFMU The oft-delayed Comics show! on Read 'Em and Weep with Bronwyn C. Onanistic Shut-In Listeners may call in and discuss their comics collections with a live human female, PLUS special guest Chris Duffy! Chris is the writer of Bizarro Comics, and the editor of Nickelodeon Magazine's Comix section, and a former editor at DC, and he knows his mainstream, his alternative, and his classics. And he knows where the bodies are buried, and he knows how to get Bronwyn C. ticked off and ranting. If Jack Cole fought Will Eisner, who would win???!!! Find out, on "Read 'em and Weep!" UT THU APRIL 10 THURSDAYS Nepal Chaite Dashain; St. Maddalena 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: The Ideas of Stewart Brand. Founder of the funky Whole Earth Catalogue, Stewart Brand was a hero of the counter-culture before he entered corporate boardrooms. He talks with Paul Kennedy [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-XXXX *KUNM Readings and Conversations, with Adhaf Soueif. Our live broadcasts from the historic Lensic Theatre in Santa Fe continue this month with Egyptian writer Adhaf Soueif. Her books include "The Map of Love," "Aisha," "In the Eye of the Sun" and "Sandpiper." Soueif is also an essayist who offers insight into post-9/11 relations between the Arab world and the West. Following her reading, Soueif will converse with Michael Silverblatt, host of Bookworm [last month: a no-show][oops: should have been at 0100 UT; lasted until 0250] 0200-xxxx *KPBS VIOLENCE AS A PUBLIC HEALTH ISSUE: HEALTH DIALOGUES: Once viewed only as a criminal justice problem, violence is now seen by many as a serious health care issue. In California, violent crime has reached alarming levels and costs society in many ways. While human loss and injury take a tremendous toll — especially on young people — the financial impact on hospitals, communities and families is also severe. In this live call-in program, you can join other listeners from around California, host Scott Shafer and a panel of experts in a discussion about treating violence as a public health issue 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: A VISIT FROM THE CSO: Our periodic musical excursions continue tonight with a visit from the Chicago Symphony Orchestra. An old friend of Extension 720, HENRY FOGEL, the retiring President of the CSO, will join us along with LARRY COMBS, its chief clarinetist, renowned violinist SAMUEL MAGAD, and many music clips. Our look at (and listen to) one of the great orchestras of the world 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: "War and Conflict in the post- Cold War, post 9/11 era." The Cold War and its central conflict - the physical and ideological battles between the United States, the Soviet Union and their proxy states - imposed a certain logic and consistency on the world. Take that away and add the bloody wars in the Balkans, Africa and the Middle East in the 90s as well as the terror attacks and warnings of more recent times and you get a very confused picture of a world at war. Is this breaking storm in Iraq about oil, democracy, freedom, empire, culture, water, diamonds, modernizing Islam or nation building in the Middle East? Some, one, or all of these things? In this hour, a museum-like tour of theories of this war 0300-0500 *KING LIVE BY GEORGE: George Shangrow conducts Orchestra Seattle and the Seattle Chamber Singers in a broadcast concert. "Mass of Life and Death" a beautifully moving setting by Seattle composer Huntley Beyer 0506-0600 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Rebroadcast): "Democratizing Iraq." Who will govern Iraq after the war? Forum looks at the roles Iraqi exiles, the United Nations and others will play. Guests: George Packer, freelance journalist and author of the recent cover story in New York Times Magazine "Dreaming of Democracy," about the role of Iraqi exiles in post-Saddam Iraq; Noah Feldman, assistant professor of law at NYU School of Law and author of "After Jihad," a new book about America and the struggle for Islamic democracy; Danielle Pletka, vice president of Foreign and Defense Policy Studies at the American Enterprise Institute; and Stephen Schwartz, director of the Islam and Democracy Program at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Music Restored: Lucie Skeaping talks to Sophie Daneman about her love of French baroque composers such as Rameau and Couperin, and her recordings of Schumann and Mendlessohn 1506-1600 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Reverberations Through the Arab World: The fall of Baghdad is causing more than a tremor in the Arab world. As the regime of Saddam Hussein crumbles, conflicting emotions ripple through the Arab states. Liberation, occupation, and mood in the Middle East % 1530-1600 *BBCR4 The Material World: How can tree rings help us learn more about volcanic eruptions hundreds of years ago? Dendrochronology is the dating of past events (climatic changes) through study of tree ring growth. It is possible to cross match ring patterns between trees from different locations around the world, meaning that the trees are storing some common environmental signal. Scientists have now realised that an environmental event, such as a volcanic eruption that puts dust and acid into the upper atmosphere, thereby cooling the earth's surface, is big enough to show up in tree rings globally. In Material World, Quentin Cooper will be finding out how archaeology and climate comes together by linking tree ring data to catastrophic climate events in the past % 1700-1800 *CAINAN THE POINT: Vern Laux, The bird-man of Martha's Vineyard 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Who will rule Iraq? % 1706-1800 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Turkey / Paul Theroux: A look at the critical role that Turkey still plays in the stabilization of the Middle East region -- Edmund Ghareeb, Mustafa Barzani scholar of Kurdish studies, American University; and media analyst of the Middle East. Travel writer Paul Theroux takes us on a journey through the heart of Africa -- Paul Theroux, travel writer, and author of Dark Star Safari: Overland From Cairo to Cape Town % 1706-1800 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: On the Media Co-Host Bob Garfield is a columnist, critic, essayist, pundit, international lecturer, and inveterate broadcaster. In print, Garfield's "Ad Review" TV-commercial criticism feature in Advertising Age has made him among the more pitifully groveled-before figures in trade- magazine history. He has written for many publications including Washington Post Magazine, The New York Times, and Sports Illustrated. Before becoming co-host of On The Media, he was a longtime commentator/ correspondent for NPR's All Things Considered [rpt at 0106] 1706-1800 *MichR TODD MUNDT: The innocent introduction of invasive species and how it changed the New World 1900-1930 *BBCR4 What If...? Counterfactual history series with Prof Chris Andrew. If Alexander the Great had expanded his empire to the West instead of the East, the Roman Empire would not have existed 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Analysis: Thinking In Public: Kenan Malik asks whether we need to revive the public role of intellectuals, especially at times of national crisis. [Rptd Sun, 2030] 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Costing The Earth: Eco Island: Will Mallorca's new environmental tax on tourists turn lager louts into bird watchers? Miriam O'Reilly investigates 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Mark Lamarr's Shake, Rattle & Roll: Mark Lamarr presents the 13th programme in his 17-part rock 'n' roll series, playing some risque rock 'n' roll tunes featuring doubles entendres 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Jammin': Second in the series of the panel show that combines comedy and rock n roll. Drummer Rowland Rivron, keyboardist Richard Vranch and bass player Dave Catlin Birch are joined by special guests 2330-xxxx *WABE Between the Lines: Paul Auster: The Book of Illusions: Six months after losing his wife and two sons in an airplane crash, Vermont professor David Zimmer spends his waking hours mired in a blur of alcoholic grief and self-pity. Then he stumbles upon a clip from a lost silent film by comedian Hector Mann and his interest is piqued. Soon he finds himself obsessed with the silent film star and embarking on a journey into a shadow world of lies, illusions, and unexpected love UT FRI APRIL 11 FRIDAYS India, Nepal Ramanavani Hinduism Costa Rica Rivas Battle Day; St. Stanislaw 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part Two of Spy Story. We are fascinated by the world of secret agents and counterintelligence. Our own spies are heroes fighting a secret war so that the rest of us can sleep soundly; those who spy for our enemies are traitors. What makes a spy? And these days, whom do you spy on when you're not sure who the enemy is? Philip Coulter goes spying [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR TODD MUNDT: The innocent introduction of invasive species and how it changed the New World 0106-0200 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: On the Media Co-Host Bob Garfield is a columnist, critic, essayist, pundit, international lecturer, and inveterate broadcaster. In print, Garfield's "Ad Review" TV-commercial criticism feature in Advertising Age has made him among the more pitifully groveled-before figures in trade- magazine history. He has written for many publications including Washington Post Magazine, The New York Times, and Sports Illustrated. Before becoming co-host of On The Media, he was a longtime commentator/ correspondent for NPR's All Things Considered 0130-0230 *KPBS REMEMBERING THE THREE STOOGES: THE LOUNGE: Dirk Sutro takes listeners through the whacky world of the Three Stooges, guided by guests Jeff Forrester -- author of a newly released book on the Stooges — and Scott Marks — curator of film at San Diego Museum of Photographic Arts and a huge Stooges fan. There will also be a conversation with Mousie Garner, a 93-year-old former stand-in Stooge, who has stories aplenty of the old days in Hollywood. To participate in the call-in program, phone (888) 895-5727. 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: ISRAEL-PALESTINE: Overshadowed by the Iraq war but never forgotten, the Israeli-Palestinian conflict continues to fester and cause innumerable problems for our foreign policy and the world. Is it conceivable that a dramatic U.S. victory in Iraq could re-spur the peace process? Many are skeptical but the current administration seems committed to redoubling its efforts after the war. This week, Northwestern University is holding a major conference on these problems and prospects, and a number of its prominent participants will join us 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: Speaking of Faith: Religion in a Time of War: More than any crisis in modern memory, the War on Terror-including the current U.S. military presence in Iraq-is being debated in religious, usually Christian, terms. We explore the nuances of that debate with a former war correspondent, a political theorist, and a renowned preacher. We ask how and whether Christian principles really make a difference at this moment in our national life-and if not, why not? 0306-0400 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Reverberations Through the Arab World: The fall of Baghdad is causing more than a tremor in the Arab world. As the regime of Saddam Hussein crumbles, conflicting emotions ripple through the Arab states. Liberation, occupation, and mood in the Middle East % 1330- W1MGY Titanic special event starts, until April 15 0527 [3-058] 1430-1500 *KUNM Friday Forum. Host and producer Stephen Spitz speaks with Chris Eyre, a young, award winning filmmaker. Eyre is a member of the Cheyenne and Arapaho nations, and his two recent feature films, "Smoke Signals" and "Skins," center on life on an Indian reservation. The interview begins with a discussion of how Eyre became interested in film, the mental process he uses to conceive and develop a story line, and the way he identifies with the main characters in his films. The discussion then turns to "Smoke Signals," which is about two young Native Americans, Thomas and William. They leave their reservation to pick up the remains of William's estranged father and along the way we learn more about their relationship and what they think it means to be an Indian in contemporary America. Through Eyre's direction we also develop an emotional attachment with both boys, something that Eyre was quite deliberate in what he describes as a "road movie." Eyre is then asked about his latest film, "Skins," which tells the story of two brothers on the Pine Ridge Reservation in South Dakota. Tribal policeman Rudy Yellowshirt struggles in his relationship with his older brother, Mogie, an alcoholic Vietnam veteran. Out of frustration, first with violence and then with alcohol and the effect they both have on the community, Rudy becomes a vigilante. Eyre talks about the decision to have violence and alcohol play a pivotal role in his films, the choice of vigilantism as a symbol, and why parts of both films are shot in almost a documentary style. Produced with the assistance of Tristan Clum and Todd Lovato 1430-1500 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: Conclusion of a two-part series on Quebeckers' attitudes towards war. In poll after poll, Quebeckers have shown the strongest opposition to the war in Iraq. This week, guest host Jeanette Kelly will explore the historical events that have shaped this attitude. And French-Canadians veteran will share some of their memories of World War Two [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1500-1600 *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House: The Iowa Songwriters' Swap Shop: It's no secret that eastern Iowa is fertile ground for singer-songwriters. Lately, many of the area's next generation of promising tune-makers have been getting together regularly to swap songs before a live audience. This hour explores the art of songwriting with lots of live music and conversation. Guests will include singer-songwriters Tom Jessen, Sam Knutson, Katheryn Musilek, Ben Schmidt, and Becca Sutlive 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Jazz Legends: Duke Ellington: Creole Rhapsody: Julian Joseph and Brian Priestley begin a monthly, six part chronological survey of the work of the great American pianist, composer and bandleader. Today they focus on the "Cotton Club" era, up to and including 1931, the year of Ellington's first extended work Creole Rhapsody. Other selections include East St Louis Toodle-Oo, Black and Tan Fantasy, Mood Indigo and Rockin' in Rhythm 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM: James MacGregor Burns: Transforming Leadership (Atlantic Monthly Press) -- Diane's live broadcast from National Geographic continues with Pulitzer Prize-winning historian James MacGregor Burns who published Leadership, twenty-five years ago; a groundbreaking examination of how leaders shaped the course of history. He has now updated his analysis for the 21st century, and he joins Diane to talk about how his views on leaders and leadership have changed % 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Friday Forum host Angie Coiro (Hour One) San Francisco -based and multinational Bechtel, the largest construction company in the United States. Guests: Layton McCartney, author of "Friends in High Places"; Janice Tuchman, editor in chief of Engineering News -Record; Patap Chatterjee, freelance environmental journalist; and David Luberoff, associate director of the Kennedy School's Taubman Center for State and Local Government and co-author of forthcoming "Mega-Projects: The Changing Politics of Urban Investment." 1700-XXXX *KPBS CHILDREN OF WAR: FIGHTING, DYING, SURVIVING – A KPBS PRESENTS SPECIAL The one-hour radio documentary takes listeners to the battlegrounds and refugee camps that shape the lives of millions of children around the globe. The program includes stories about child soldiers, children fleeing conflict and the physical and psychological rehabilitation of children touched by war. Also, there will be surprising reports about teenage recruits in the British army and the danger that depleted uranium ammunition poses for children, plus the latest policy developments. Charlayne Hunter-Gault, CNN Johannesburg bureau chief and correspondent, hosts 1706-1800 *WBOI WBOI Magazine Special: Backroads. Today, hear four traveling stories out of public radio's past, audio excursions from the early eighties: * "Fifty Miles Out of Gerlach"- John Rieger samples small-town life. * "Road Ranger"- the Kitchen Sisters track an auto-mechanic/American hero. * "Cross My Path"- Jay Allison trails an animal rescuer across L.A.. * "Trip To the Dentist"- Larry Massett takes a nitrous-oxide fueled 'trip.' 1706-1730 *WHYY THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: Imagine it's 1979 and you're at Peet's Coffee in Palo Alto eavesdropping on two geeks named Gates and Jobs as they plot the future of world communications. Journalist David Sheff had that opportunity, but in China, at what is the dawn of their information age. What will happen when this behemoth leapfrogs from a rural economy to a high-tech juggernaut? 1706-1730 *MichR THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: as above 1706-1800 *WBEZ Odyssey: The monster in popular consciousness 1706-1800 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: The crisis in the Catholic Church over clergy sexual abuse has resulted in hundreds of lawsuits in dioceses across the country. In some cases, settlements are being made... in others, priests have confessed to committing these abusive acts. It's been a painful and costly journey for many that shows no sign of nearing an end. But the crisis has also shone the spotlight on the resources available for victims of clergy sexual abuse. Support groups have seen their membership numbers rise as individuals come forward to share their experiences and seek help in dealing with the spiritual and psychological effects of abuse. We'll explore the church crisis from the viewpoint of the survivors of abuse 1800-1830 *KUSP Fine Print: Rick Kleffel talks with Alan Deutschman, author of 'A Tale of Two Valleys', about the Wine Wars between Napa and Sonoma; and 'The Second Coming of Steve Jobs' about the computer industry luminary's third act 1800-1830 *BBCR2 Midnight Train To Georgia: Heard It Through The Grapevine: Des'ree, one of Britain's best-loved singer-songwriters takes us on a four week evening train journey back to Georgia, to celebrate the music and the amazing life of Gladys Knight. Places, and their move to Motown in Detroit and their touring days with the Motortown Revue. Steeped in the gospel tradition, like so many soul singers, Gladys Knight and the Pips developed into one of Motown's most dependable acts, although they never quite scaled the commercial heights of fellow stars on the label like the Supremes, Marvin Gaye, and the Temptations. It wasn't until Norman Whitfield took over the production, and much of the song-writing for the Pips, that they found more commercial success 1806-1900 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: Fusion Research / Managing Risk / Forensics in Iraq. Between the threat of terrorism and the mystery of SARS, it's certain that we're living in uncertain times. Join Ira Flatow in this hour of Science Friday for a look at managing risk in the face of uncertainty. Plus, we'll hear about recent fusion experiments, and the role of forensic scientists in Iraq 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Who is really calling the shots at the White House? Find out after three, when Kathleen Dunn's guest talks about the man he calls "the co-president of the United States". Guest: James Moore, an Emmy award winning television news correspondent and documentary producer, and co-author (with Wayne Slater) of "Bush's Brain" (Wiley) 2006-2100 *WBOI The Todd Mundt Show: Journalist David Sheff has been observing the dawn of their information age in China. What will happen when this behemoth leapfrogs from a rural economy to a high-tech juggernaut? We'll find out 2100-2130 *BBCR2 The Music Never Ends: David Jacobs tells the story of Michel Legrand, composer, pianist and music lover. Part 3. All This And Money Too: Following the success of the French film musical 'The Umbrellas of Cherbourg' (it was nominated for Best Original Score, Best Musical Scoring and Best Song in the 1965 Oscars) Legrand set his sights on Hollywood. Henry Mancini became his mentor, and suggested Legrand for the score for 'The Thomas Crown Affair' as Mancini was too busy. The rest is history. This programme considers Legrand in Hollywood, with special guests film director Norman Jewison, Henry Mancini's widow Ginny, lyricists Alan and Marilyn Bergman, and singer Jack Jones, and others 2115-2230 *BBCR3 Andy Kershaw: A session from Algerian singer Souad Massi, who performs acoustic versions of songs from her new album Deb. 2200-2230 *BBCR4 Great Lives: Series of biographical discussions with Humphrey Carpenter. Conductor Leonard Slatkin discusses the genius of composer Sergei Rachmaninov, with biographer Geoffrey Norris 2200-2400 *KSUI Know the Score LIVE! The world-renowned Tallis Scholars will open our program, just a few hours before they take the stage at Hancher Auditorium. Then Director Eric Forsythe will kick things off with conversation about the University of Iowa Theater production of The Flea in Her Ear, currently in production. Shari Rhoads and Ksenia Nosikova will follow with music for piano 4-hands (music for two pianists, playing at the same keyboard). Iowa City author Tess Weaver will tell us why she wrote her wonderful children's story Opera Cat which will be read by 12 year old Daria Kieffer. And University of Iowa Museum of Art (UIMA) curator Kathleen Edwards will join print dealers Alan Platt and Stephen Goddard in discussing regionalist artists and their print work. They are all taking part in the UIMA exhibition "Celebrating the Farm" and this will launch the museum's print sale [repeats on Sun, Wed] 2206-2300 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: Iraqis are not the only targets of allied forces – reporters are too – so says Dave Berkman's guest today after five on Media Talk. Join in for a discussion of whether the military killed members of the media on purpose. Guest: Tala (Tah-Lah) Dowlatshahi (Dah-lot-shah-HE) U.S. Representative REPORTERS W/OUT BORDERS UT SAT APRIL 12 SATURDAYS Nigeria parliamentary elections Hungary referendum; Malta parliamentary elections Fiji National Youth Day Saturday; Nauru parliamentary elections 0000-XXXX *WUGA Roger Dancz's Invitation to Jazz: Harmonica virtuoso Toots Thielemans (from 1995) 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: The Los Angeles Guitar Quartet in an eclectic program of music by Stravinsky, Piazzolla, Copland, Bizet, Chick Corea, and LAGQ member Andrew York, among others 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part Two of In the Stalin Archives...new revelations of famine and repression, as University of Toronto historian Robert Johnson revisits the Stalin era in the light of discoveries made since the archives on Soviet history were opened [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0030 *MichR THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: Imagine it's 1979 and you're at Peet's Coffee in Palo Alto eavesdropping on two geeks named Gates and Jobs as they plot the future of world communications. Journalist David Sheff had that opportunity, but in China, at what is the dawn of their information age. What will happen when this behemoth leapfrogs from a rural economy to a high-tech juggernaut? 0106-0200 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: The crisis in the Catholic Church over clergy sexual abuse has resulted in hundreds of lawsuits in dioceses across the country. In some cases, settlements are being made... in others, priests have confessed to committing these abusive acts. It's been a painful and costly journey for many that shows no sign of nearing an end. But the crisis has also shone the spotlight on the resources available for victims of clergy sexual abuse. Support groups have seen their membership numbers rise as individuals come forward to share their experiences and seek help in dealing with the spiritual and psychological effects of abuse. We'll explore the church crisis from the viewpoint of the survivors of abuse 0106-0200 *MichR The Connection: Russia and the reconstruction of Iraq. Before America's former Cold War foe can lay claim to its investments there, before it can share in the spoils of rebuilding Iraq, it has a lot of diplomatic reconstruction to do with the United States % 0300-0400 *KQED Commonwealth Club: Wolfgang Ischinger, German Ambassador to the United States. With thousands of U.S. troops stationed in Germany, Berlin has long been regarded as one of Washington's closest allies. How does Germany's vigorous opposition to the war on Iraq change that? Ambassador Ischinger stresses the many common interests and concerns shared by Germany and the United States 0400-0500 *KUNM Afropop Worldwide, "Malagasy Guitar." Madagascar is home to guitar styles as unique, beautiful and varied as its famed flora and fauna. In this program, we check in on highlands finger-pickers, salegy pop guitarists in the north, and wild and wooly tsapika guitarists in the south. We'll also hear from some of the guitar's string-instrument cousins in Madagascar: the valiha, the marovany and the kabosy. String magic from Madagascar 1200-1230 *BBCR2 The Smith Lectures: Professor Arthur Smith comes direct from the washroom at the University of Tooting Bec, where he covers the topic of grooming. 1200-1300 *BBCR3 World Routes: One of the world's most famous songs comes from the 'Son Jarocho' musical style of Veracruz state in Mexico. Lucy Duran visits Mexico to explore the harps, jarana guitars and fancy footwork that are part of the revival of this once neglected music 1230-1300 *BBCR2 Jammin': Presented by Rowland Rivron, Jammin' is a unique radio show. Each week we form a 5 piece band, made up of comedians & musicians who literally jam together within a format that allows them to improvise and riff off each other. The backline is always made up of Rowland Rivron (Drums), Dave Catlin Birch (Bass) and Richard Vranch (keyboards). They are joined by recording artistes such as the Icicle Works' Ian McNabb, Blacks' Colin Vearncombe, and arguably the world's most famous session musician, Herbie Flowers. There are also a number of very talented comedians who can also play a bit, including perrier award winner Justin Edwards, former lounge crooner Lenny Beige, aka Steve Furst, and the vocal chameleon that is Jason Wood. They make musical worlds collide on a week to week basis. Imagine Marilyn Manson covering the Everly Brothers 'Dream', or Gabrielle singing 'i am a cider drinker.' 1305-1400 *CBCR1 That Saturday Show: Lost and Found. Peter Brown tracks down a shipload of running shoes that were lost in the Pacific Ocean. Also, an amazing story about a kayak that was frozen into the ice on the eastern arm of the Mackenzie River - and was found! Plus a man who found a digital camera in a New York taxi, and tracked down the owner using photos and email. And the search for the ultimate lost-and-found object in Toronto, London and Washington [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1405-1430 *CBCR1 WHAT A WEEK comedy debut [3-062] [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1430-1500 *BBCR4 The Indispensables: Lynne Truss returns with a new series in which she examines the revolutionary impact of everyday objects. 1. The Deodorant -- Today 90% of the population hold up their hands with confidence thanks to deodorant, which was invented in 1888. By the 1960s it was still a relative novelty, with talc, lemons and armpit pads used instead. Lynne Truss uncovers the history of deodorant with James Dyson and Uri Geller; she meets the man who sniffs armpits for a living, and finds out why deodorant is behind the rocketing divorce rate 1505-1600 *CBCR1 Quirks and Quarks: It Really is Rocket Science: For fifty years, we've been sending spacecraft around the solar system using chemical rockets. But we're now on the cusp of a new generation of technologies for getting around in space, from nuclear electric propulsion systems to anti-matter rockets. A look at just what the space explorers of the future will be driving. Also...Lucky Seven for Canadian chromosome counters [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1706-1800 *WHYY BEEN THERE DONE THAT with Marty Goldensohn: Some lessons on survival. First, a walk in the woods with the real-life tracker portrayed in the movie "The Hunted". Also, a South African psychologist talks about forgiving torture and murder; how to move on after terminal embarrassment; and why college graduates fear leaving the Ivory Tower. Plus, Bob Dylan's songs of lost love; how to plan a theme party for Sir Elton John; and pet bereavement -- saying goodbye to Sparky. Visit our website at http://www.whyy.org/btdt for information, links and all our archived programs. (Rebroadcast Fri 0200) 1755-1815 *BBCR3 MET OPERA INTERVAL: Letters From The New World: Living Off The Grid: Richard Grant lives on an isolated ranch in southern Arizona without any connections to electricity, gas, water, telephone or sewage. Should he buy a gun? [time approx.] 1755-1815 *MORN MET OPERA Intermission #1: Alan Wagner explores the confused theology of Parsifal; Met make-up artist Victor Callegari talks with Elaine Warner [time approx.] 1900-2000 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: A Twist To Life: In April 1953, the journal Nature reported what was probably the most important scientific discovery of the 20th century - the double helix structure of DNA, the molecule of life. The classic breakthrough came to Francis Crick and Jim Watson as the climax to an intellectual race between scientists in Cambridge and London, Britain and the USA. In an instant it put flesh on the bones of Mendels theories of inheritance and Darwin`s theory of evolution by natural selection. But the gene story was only just beginning. It was destined to transform medicine and agriculture and give birth to whole new areas of research and industry, from GM food to biotechnology. Professor Steve Jones tells the story of DNA and its discovery against the backdrop of the hopes and fears that it engendered. He also looks at how the double spiral of DNA has become an icon, on our stamps and coins, commerce and even in our beer. And he looks at how it has been portrayed in art and music. The programme includes contributions from Francis Crick and Jim Watson, as well as Maurice Wilkins (who shared the 1962 Nobel Prize for discovering the structure of DNA), and Ray Gosling and Peter Pauling (who didn't). 1940-2000 *BBCR3 The Met Opera Quiz: Brian Zeger puts listeners' questions to Louise Guinther, Stuart Hamilton and Terrence McNally 2006-2100 *WBEZ ON THE MEDIA: Coordinating the coalition message: one office reaches overseas to make sure all the allies sing in tune 2100-2200 *KQED Soundprint: Segment One: "Throne of St. James." In a Washington DC garage, James Hampton, a non-descript janitor by trade, started work on the Throne of the Third Heaven of the Nations Millennium General Assembly. Built entirely out of discarded objects, this 180-piece sculpture was discovered after James' death in 1964. Considered by some to be one of the finest examples of American visionary religious art, the Throne resides at the Smithsonian. This is the story of The Throne of St. James. Segment Two: "Conversations in a Black Barbershop." Join us as we spend an afternoon in a barbershop in Washington DC run by black Muslims. The conversation runs from issues of religion and family, to school, sports and the political system, all set against the buzz of the hairclippers and the busy neighborhood ambience of this informal gathering place [NOT: part 1 = Hitler`s yacht instead!] 2106-2200 *KPBS POET LAUREATE BILLY COLLINS: A WAY WITH WORDS: Hosts Richard Lederer and Charles Harrington Elster are joined by United States Poet Laureate Billy Collins. No poet since Robert Frost has had the combination of critical acclaim and broad popular appeal that Collins has, according to his biography. In this interview, Collins will read poems and talk about Poetry 180, an effort to bring poetry to U.S. high schools. For more about Billy Collins, hear Noah Adams' interview with Collins at All Things Considered's Web site 2115-2200 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: The Emerging Mind: Synapses And The Self Professor Ramachandran gives the second Reith Lecture, on tracking visual pathways with the help of patients who are blind 2200-2230 *CBCR1 The World this Weekend: Last year, right-wing terrorists in South Africa caused havoc by planting bombs in Soweto and other cities. The government arrested members of a group wanting an all-white, Christian South Africa. Reese Erlich reports that the group has relatively few supporters, but South Africans worry that it could do untold damage to the country's stability. Also, the latest from the World Curling Championships in Winnipeg [+1/2/3 hours] 2230-2400 *BBCR3 Hear And Now: Orchestral Frames And Musique Concrète: In a special session for Hear and Now, the BBC Symphony Orchestra, conducted by David Porcelijn plays two works by Kevin Volans written over the last twelve years; 100 Frames for Orchestra (1991) and Concerto for Orchestra his most recent orchestral piece, commissioned by the BBC and premiered by the BBCSO in 2002. Alwynne Pritchard introduces the works. Plus Robert Worby launches the first of five reports from a new electronic music festival, co-produced between Hear and Now and the ICA: 'Cut And Splice'. The series looks at the history of electronic music over the last forty years, and kicks off here with Musique Concrète, featuring the pioneering work of Bernard Parmegiani alongside pieces by Montreal sound artist Christian Calon and Austria's Farmers Manual UT SUN APRIL 13 SUNDAYS Chad National Day; Cambodia Khmer New Year Hinduism Laos Laotian New Year (Pi Mai); Myanmar New Year - Maha Thingyan Sri Lanka Day before Sinhala and Tamil New Year Thailand Maha Songkran* Buddhism (Theravada) Alabama, Oklahoma Thomas Jefferson's Birthday; St. Julius I 0100-0200 *WOIa Prairie Lights: Sanjay Nigam grew up in the United States of East Indian descent. A physician as well as an extraordinary novelist, Nigan will read from his second novel, "Transplanted Man," about the Indian Subculture in New York City 0100-0230 *WQXR On Wings of Song - soprano Twyla Robinson performs: Robinson is a winner of the 2002 Metropolitan Opera National Council Auditions. She made her professional debut in 2000 as Erste Dame in Die Zauberflöte at San Francisco Opera. As an Adler Fellow at SFO, she appeared as Giunone and Destino in La Calisto, Lady Billows in Albert Herring, and on the 2001 Schwabacher Debut Recital Series. She was also the only Adler Fellow to perform as a featured artist on Lotfi Mansouri's Farewell Gala. Other operatic credits include Donna Anna and Donna Elvira in Don Giovanni, the Countess in Le Nozze di Figaro, Fiordiligi in Cosí fan Tutte, Alice Ford in Falstaff, and the title roles in Susannah and Arabella. Ms. Robinson has also captured first place in such competitions as the FéBland Foundation competition, the Northwest Vocal Competition, and the inaugural year of the Opera by the Bay Summer Festival Vocal Competition. She has been a second place winner in the MacAllister Awards, and the recipient of two Merola Opera Program Career Grants [WQXR says one hour; NYRG says one sesquihour] 0200-0300 *WOIa Prairie Lights: Nick Arvin, University of Iowa Workshop and Stanford Engineering School graduate, will read from his first collection of stories, "In the Electric Eden." This collection of stories conflates technical achievement and human development as only an engineer with a writers' sensibility can do 1300-1400 *BBCR3 BBC Legends: Ruggiero Ricci: Stephen Johnson considers some of the BBC recordings made by virtuoso violinist Ruggiero Ricci. Includes recordings of Mendelssohn's E minor Concerto and a selection of Paganini caprices for solo violin, as well as Ricci in conversation, reminiscing on the perils of being an infant prodigy 1400-1500 *BBCR3 Private Passions: Michael Berkeley's guest today is Peter Brookes, political cartoonist of The Times. His great love is opera, and today he has chosen extracts from Mozart's Don Giovanni, Tchaikovsky's Eugene Onegin, Handel's Rinaldo, and Stravinsky's The Rake's Progress. He is also passionate about chamber music, and movements from quartets by Janacek and Shostakovich feature among his choices 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Brian Kay's Light Programme: Includes Peter Hope's Four French Dances, Charles Williams takes a Quiet Stroll, Leroy Anderson puts a dime in the Classical Jukebox and Theatre Bel-Etage make merry with Lionel Monckton's Arcadians 1600-1640 *BBCR4 Capitalist Punishment: In America, privatised prisons are big business. But can a prison system be run for profit without creating more problems than it solves? Lucy Ash investigates. 1600-1645 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Poulenc: Quatre motets pour un temps de pénitence: Chris de Souza explores the deeply spiritual side of a composer who is often better known for his mocking wit and ironic vaudevillian style. With specially recorded music examples and performances by the BBC Singers, conducted by Justin Doyle 1600-1700 *KGOU Speaking of Faith: The Story Behind the Stories: In the coinciding holidays of Easter and Passover, the core stories of two world religions are celebrated. This program explores imaginative ways of approaching ancient texts to give them modern sense. Guests include Rabbi/author Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, minister/ actress Linda Loving, and provocative reflections of Duke University theologian Richard Hays. The hour also features readings from the Bible, words of a 14th Century mystic, and poetry from Wendell Berry. Krista Tippett hosts 1600-1800 *KUNI WORLD CHORAL SPECTACULAR monthly: Hour one: The Scandinavian Connection; Hour Two: Little European Countries Ending in ia 1645-1730 *BBCR3 The Sunday Feature: Looking For Isaac Babel: Before the NKVD shot him in the back of the head in January 1940, Isaac Babel made one final plea "let me finish my work". Along with Babel, 27 folders of his work were swallowed up in the confines of the Lubyanka. Ever since rumours, myth and secrets have swirled around this greatest of Russian writers. Now Professor Jim Riordan talks to friends, lovers and family who reveal the man, and looks for clues to Babel's lost work from those who ceaselessly search the mouldering Moscow archives 1700-xxxx *YPR On Thomas Jefferson's 216th birthday, a reading of the letters he exchanged late in life with John Adams 1700-1800 *KGOU WHY THIS NIGHT: A PASSOVER SPECIAL: A conversation between Rabbi Ismar Schorsche, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, and host Larry Josephson, focusing on the Seder, a ritual meal that recounts the escape of the Jews from slavery in Egypt and their eventual arrival in the Promised Land. This discussion will include the history, liturgy and foods of Passover. The dialog is mixed with the music of Passover, chosen by Cantor Marcia Tilchin of Congregation B`nai Israel of Tustin, California. The selected music is a treasure trove of rare recording of sacred and secular Jewish music, some of the most beautiful and moving Passover music available. Passover begins the evening of Wednesday, April 16th, with the First Seder. The Second Seder occurs the following night, Thursday, April 17th. While most Jews celebrate only the first and second nights of Passover, the holiday lasts eight days, ending on April 24th 1706-1800 *KPBS POET LAUREATE BILLY COLLINS: A WAY WITH WORDS: Hosts Richard Lederer and Charles Harrington Elster are joined by United States Poet Laureate Billy Collins. No poet since Robert Frost has had the combination of critical acclaim and broad popular appeal that Collins has, according to his biography. In this interview, Collins will read poems and talk about Poetry 180, an effort to bring poetry to U.S. high schools. For more about Billy Collins, hear Noah Adams' interview with Collins at All Things Considered's Web site 1730-1900 *WPRm SUNDAY AFTERNOON LIVE FROM ELVEHJEM: Wausau Conservatory of Music Massenet: Elegie; Leroux: Le Nil; Braga: La Serenata; Bayly: I'd Be A Butterfly; Campra: Charmant Papillon Schubert: Der Schmetterling Chausson: Les Papillons; Gershwin: Rhapsody in Blue (piano duet) 1900-1930 *BBCR4 A World In Your Ear: Emily Buchanan chooses some highlights of English language radio from around the world. There are features from Canada, New York, Australia and Northern India 1900-2030 *BBCR3 Choirworks: In a special Palm Sunday edition, Paul Guinery introduces a performance of a virtuoso setting of the St Matthew Passion for unaccompanied choir, composed in 1950 by the German Ernst Pepping (1901-1979). He saw himself as the modern inheritor of the great tradition of sacred music, extending back before the time of Bach to some of the earliest traditions of the Protestant German Church, where the Passion story was told through a sequence of unaccompanied choral motets. Ernst Pepping: Passion according to St Matthew. BBC Singers, Stefan Parkman (conductor) 1900-2100 *WQXR Live from Trinity Church: Haydn's Stabat Mater. As part of its ongoing support of the music programs of Trinity Church Wall Street, WQXR will broadcast a live concert performance of Haydn's Stabat Mater by the Trinity Choir conducted by Dr. Owen Burdick, music director of Trinity Church. The Trinity Choir, under Burdick's direction, comprising twenty-two of New York's finest professional singers, has established itself as one of the city's preeminent vocal ensembles. The choir has recorded Handel's Messiah, which, since its release to critical acclaim in the fall of 1999 on the Naxos label, has sold over 15,000 copies. Their 2001 CD release, Christmas from Trinity for Naxos, has been the top-selling Christmas CD in New York for the past two years. Conductor, composer, and a leading expert in the use of electronic music in the church, Owen Burdick has been the seventeenth Organist and Director of Music of historic Trinity Church since 1990 2000-2100 *WPRi University of the Air: In April 1865 the Civil War ended, but the fate of the Union hung in the balance. This afternoon at three during University of the Air--Lincoln's Last Days 2000-2200 *KSUI KNOW THE SCORE: Repeat of Fri 2200, q.v. 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Analysis: Thinking In Public: Kenan Malik asks whether we need to revive the public role of intellectuals, especially at times of national crisis 2030-2130 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Steven Pinker, psychologist of language at MIT [beware of pledge breaks] 2105-2200 *BBCR3 Chandos Anthems: Harry Christophers conducts two of the magnificent anthems composed by Handel for the private chapel of his first English employer, the Duke of Chandos. GF Handel: Chandos Anthem No.10: The Lord is my Light. Eleanor Meynell (soprano), Daniel Auchincloss (tenor), Andrew Murgatroyd (tenor). GF Handel: Chandos Anthem No. 6: As pants the hart: Eleanor Meynell (soprano), Elizabeth Poole (soprano), Daniel Auchincloss (tenor); BBC Singers, The Symphony of Harmony and Invention, Harry Christophers (conductor) 2200-2300 *WGBH The Whole Wide World, Part 5: an examination of the effects of globalization on the future of the planet 2200-2300 *WBEZ The Whole Wide World (PRI): Part Five weighs the burdens of killer viruses, global warming and environmental exhaustion on the human habitat 2200-2400 *KING Live Orchestra Seattle broadcast concert. George Shangrow conducts Borodin's Polovtsian Dances (With full chorus), the Shostakovich Symphony No. 5, and with soloist Judith Cohen, the Piano Concerto No. 3 by Prokofiev 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Something Understood: Mark Tully explores the tension between contemplation and action in the spiritual life. He talks to Philip Roderick of the Quiet Garden Trust and of Contemplatives In Action 2300-2400 *WBEZ Speaking of Faith: Stories Behind the Story (Minnesota Public Radio): In the coinciding holidays of Easter and Passover, the core stories of two world religions are celebrated. Through intelligent conversation and evocative narrative, this program explores imaginative ways of approaching ancient texts to give them modern sense. The hour features readings from the Bible, the words of a fourteenth-century mystic, and poetry from Wendell Berry. Guests include rabbi/author Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, minister/actress Linda Loving, and Duke theologian Richard Hays 2300-2400 *CAINAN The Changing World: Blockbusters, Burgers and Bluejeans II UT MON APRIL 14 MONDAYS Uganda Idi Amin Dada's Downfall's Day Bangladesh Bangla Naba Barsha - Navabarsha Cambodia Khmer New Year Hinduism Jammu & Kashmir, Maharashtra Dr. Babasaheb Ambedkar Jayanti Hinduism India (Manipur) Cheiraoba Hinduism India (Orissa, Uttar Pradesh) Dr. Bhimrao Ambedkar's Birthday - Maha Visuv Sankrati; Tamilnadu Tamil and Sinhala New Year Hinduism Laos Laotian New Year (Pi Mai); Nepal Bangla Naba Barsha - Navabarsha Sri Lanka Tamil and Sinhala New Year Hinduism Thailand Nao Day Buddhism (Theravada) Haiti, Honduras Americas Day 0000-0100 *WBEZ Why This Night: A Passover Special (The Radio Foundation): A conversation between Rabbi Ismar Schorsche, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, and host Larry Josephson, focusing on the Seder, a ritual meal that recounts the escape of the Jews from slavery in Egypt and their eventual arrival in the Promised Land. This discussion will include the history, liturgy and foods of Passover 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILES: Salman Rushdie: Long on the hit list of Iranian officials, Salman Rushdie received instantaneous international exposure immediately after publishing of his book, The Satanic Verses. This hour-long interview was recorded at KQED in San Francisco 0000-0100 *CAINAN Whole Wide World with Christopher Lydon: Recovery and Self- Preservation 0100-0200 *CAINAN Rania Masri: Iraq War & Occupation, Consequences for the Middle East 0100-0200 *WFIU American Radio Works: Hard Time - Life After Prison: This special looks at the impact America's 30-year war on crime has had on communities and families. The war shows signs of winding down - arrest numbers have flattened, "three strikes" laws are being scaled back, the prison building boom is over - but decades of "tough on crime" policies have left the U.S. with 2 million people behind bars and some 600,000 being released from prison each year. In a northeast central neighborhood in Durham, North Carolina, the War on Crime has shaped three generations. The community started feeling its effects in the 1960s as more and more young men began disappearing for months and years at a time. More than ten million children in the U.S. have experienced one or both parents in prison. We follow one family - the mother is a recently released ex-con with two sons; and the father is in prison - as they recreate their lives. A staggering 7% of the adult population has been found guilty of a felony, and though the average sentence is three years, the consequences of a prison record last a lifetime. Most will leave prison poorly educated, broke, and with few job prospects. This story is collaboration with the PBS program Now with Bill Moyers and will air as a series on NPR's All Things Considered 0200-0300 *WFIU A Taste of Passover: Under the artistic direction of Hankus Netsky, founder and director of the world-famous Klezmer Conservatory Band, A Taste of Passover is a fast-paced variety show, featuring Theodore Bikel, David Levine, and Chasia Segal, along with orchestral, choral, and chamber ensembles from the New England Conservatory. The program's non-stop fun and festivities make listeners feel as if they're part of a large extended family that is thoroughly enjoying the holiday. Recorded live in New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall, A Taste of Passover includes homespun and concert versions of a wide variety of music from the Passover repertoire, with witty commentary written by humorist Moshe Waldoks. The program not only features beautiful and uplifting music, but also favorite Passover drinking tunes, zany seder songs, and delightfully entertaining segments, such as instructions for cooking the perfect matzo ball. Hankus Netsky, a multi-instrumentalist and composer, is on the faculty at the New England Conservatory in Boston, where he has taught for 18 years. He is founder and director of the Klezmer Conservatory Band, a renowned Yiddish music ensemble. Netsky has recorded extensively, composed scores for Rabbit Ears Radio, and recently served as a consultant for and performer in "In the Fiddler's House," a WNET Great Performances production 0200-0300 *CAINAN How Long's Trane Been Gone, John Coltrane III 0200-0300 *WUOT Echoes of a Golden Age: Tenormania 0400-0500 *WYSO One People Many Stories: Passover: Hosted by the irrepressible Jerry Stiller, this hour-long special from One People, Many Stories shares stories of Passover. The spring holiday celebrates renewal and rebirth figuratively and literally – it is a time when Jews remember the Biblical story of the Exodus, the Israelites' journey from slavery to freedom. Tonight, we'll hear Passover tales that focus on heroines. Celebrating spring, "A Prayer for the Earth," read by Joan Allen, tells of Na-amah, Noah's wife, who gathers the seeds of the earth while her husband corrals the animals onto the ark. In "Miriam's Cup," reader Sara Mornell shares the Exodus story from the perspective of Moses' sister, Miriam. According to legend, she played a crucial role in the Jews' escape from slavery. We'll also enjoy an American tale, "The Carp in the Bathtub," read by Estelle Parsons, that pays tribute to one of the holiday's culinary delights, gefilte fish. Miriam Margolyse reads "The Magician," a Yiddish classic, in which an elderly couple is visited by an elusive stranger, who conjures hope and a sumptuous Passover meal. And finally, "Zayde's Trunk," read by Mike Burstyn, is the story of a more contemporary exodus to freedom. It recreates the coming of age of a Jewish boy at the beginning of the 20th century. Fleeing from the pogroms of Russia and landing on the shores of America, he journeys to the Wild West and, ultimately, makes a new life in Wisconsin 0500-0600 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Ed Viesturs, the expedition leader featured in the 1996 IMAX documentary of Everest. They'll talk about the technology he evolved for peak performance and about his personal quest to climb the 12 highest mountains in the world - all without supplemental oxygen. Moira will also speak with gambling expert James Swain. We'll find out why the high-tech security of Las Vegas casinos became interesting to the government post 9/11 1206-1300 *WPRi Tom Clark: There are intelligent voices on the left side of the political spectrum–but they're drowned out by the lunatic fringe of the anti-war movement. That's according to Tom Clark's guest after seven, who says American leftists should rise above simplistic anti-war rhetoric. Guest: Norah Vincent, Senior Fellow at the Foundation for the Defense of Democracies 1445-1500 *BBCR4 Concrete Dreams: Arizona: 'What do I do? I sell dreams!' Every estate agent knows that although they appear to be selling a view, a floor space, a three piece bathroom suite, they're really selling a dream. David Aaronovitch goes in search of the dreams being sold in four locations around the world through the eyes of estate agents. Phoenix is the fastest growing city in the US, located in the heart of the Arizona desert. It's a town where you have to declare your scorpions to incoming purchasers, where there are more swimming pools per head than anywhere else in the US and more deaths by drowning too. The Hopi Indians made this the centre of their civilisation for hundreds of years - so how did they cope without the air conditioning? 1500-1530 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: From funeral foods to eating for the afterlife, Sheila Dillon explores the connections between food and death 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: There's No Business Like Irving Berlin: Edward Seckerson presents a two part Easter Parade of work from the legendary songwriter of whom Jerome Kern observed "Irving has no place in American music. He is American music". Including God Bless America, Everybody's Doing It and Blue Skies. 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: Before the war they flocked to Iraq from across the Mideast, North Africa and the Pacific. Now some are heading home defeated while others keep fighting coalition troops. On The Connection after ten, the ethos of Muslim brotherhood 1600-1900 *WFMU Mondo Topless on Three Chord Monte with Joe Belock: Organ-driven garage freakouts from this fearsome Philly foursome 1606-1700 *WBOI Fresh Air with Terry Gross: How World War I and its aftermath helped create today s Middle East...a talk with historian David Fromkin, author of A Peace to End All Peace: The Fall of the Ottoman Empire and the Creation of the Modern Middle East 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): Three winners of the 14th annual Goldman Environmental Prize which are being presented tonight in San Francisco. Guests: Odigha Odigha, environmental activist from Cross River State, Nigeria who won protection for Nigeria's last remaining rain forests; Von Hernandez, environmental activist from the Philippines whose campaigns have led the Philippines to institute the world's first nationwide ban on waste incinerators; and Julia Bonds, environmental activist from West Virginia who leads the campaign to stop mountaintop removal coal mining throughout Appalachia 1612-1700 *WCPN Around Noon: "Northcoast Neighbors Share a Book – Fahrenheit 451" Dee invites listeners to share their thoughts on Ray Bradbury's Fahrenheit 451, this year's featured selection in the second annual Northcoast Neighbors "Share a Book" program. Dee is joined by a panel of bookworms including Plain Dealer book editor Karen Sandstrom, Richard Fox from the Cleveland Public Library; and Bob Ethington from Akron-Summit County Library, who will discus Bradbury's award-winning novel. Next, Dee will open the phones for listeners to join the discussion. Finally, listeners will hear from Ray Bradbury himself, as Dee shares selections from an archived interview with the legendary science fiction master 1700-1800 *BBCR3 Singers At Six: Love Songs In Waltz Time: As a prelude to Performance On Three, Paul Guinery introduces another side of Brahms the choral composer with a performance of his best-loved secular work, together with music by composers he admired. Robert Schumann: Talismane; An die Sterne (Op.141) Franz Schubert: Der 23 Psalm (D.706) Felix Mendelssohn: Die Nachtigal; Ruhetal (Op.59) Johannes Brahms: Liebeslieder Waltzes (Op.52) BBC Singers, Stephen Betteridge and Richard Pearce (piano duet), Bob Chilcott (conductor) 1700-1800 *WBOI Magazine Passover Special: Why This Night? A conversation between Rabbi Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, and host Larry Josephson, focusing on the Seder, a ritual meal that recounts the escape of the Jews from slavery in Egypt and their eventual arrival in the Promised Land. This discussion will touch on the history, liturgy and foods of Passover. The dialogue is mixed with the music of Passover, selected by Cantor Marcia Tilchin, who has chosen some of the most beautiful and moving Passover music available, some from her own private collection, a treasure trove of rare recordings of sacred and secular Jewish music 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Stephen Eagle Funk is a 20 year old Marine reservist, 1/2 Filipino, and gay. He recently became the first West Coast public war resister from the ranks of the Marines during this conflict His story is familiar to many young people who have been lured by aggressive recruiters into joining the military, and have a change of heart. Host John Sandidge talks with Aimee Allison, Stephen Eagle Funk's military counselor. Also, Assmeblyman John Laird updates us on the week's legislative activity in Sacramento 1830-2030 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: BBC Symphony Orchestra At the Barbican: Two masterpieces of the German Romantic tradition, conducted by the distinguished Viennese conductor, Walter Weller. After Schubert's "Unfinished" Symphony, the BBC Symphony Chorus joins the Orchestra in Brahms' Requiem, written in the 1860s shortly after the death of his mother, and dedicated to his late friend Robert Schumann, his mother, and the whole of humanity 1900-1930 *BBCR4 In The Footsteps Of Moses: Edward Stourton explores the 4000 year history of the Jewish people and traces how the moment God allegedly met Moses on Mount Sinai, as described in the book of Exodus, still effects [sic] events today 1906-2000 *NPR Talk of the Nation: British historian Niall Fergusen sees the rise and fall of British world order as an object lesson for the United States. He joins us to talk about empires 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: As regime change is being prosecuted in Iraq, Tim Whewell goes to Serbia where four years ago allied planes were bombing another dictatorial regime out of power. With Slobodan Miloshevich in the dock in The Hague and a democratically elected government in power in Belgrade the West claimed success. But last month the Prime Minister was assassinated in broad daylight and Tim finds the country in turmoil. An unholy alliance of organised criminal gangs, war criminals, security forces and extreme nationalist politicians is taking on the government in a fight for power. For Crossing Continents Tim asks will the vulnerable young democracy survive? 2000-2100 *WUGA A TASTE OF PASSOVER: Special program that welcomes you to participate in the joy and celebratory spirit of the Jewish feast. Under the artistic direction of Hankus Netsky, founder and director of the world-famous Klezmer Conservatory Band, A Taste of Passover presents a fast-paced variety show, featuring Theodore Bikel, David Levine, and Chasia Sega, along with orchestral, choral, and chamber ensembles from the New England Conservatory 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Live From The Stables: Divine Comedy frontman Neil Hannon performs the haunting 'If You Go Away', and Dame Cleo Laine takes centre stage to perform tracks from her new album 'Quality Time' 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: How the geography and the politics of the Middle East were shaped by the Allies during and after World War I. A talk with David Fromkin, author of the bestseller "A Peace to End All Peace." 2030-2115 *BBCR3 Night Waves: Isabel Hilton and guests discuss Atom Egoyan's new film Ararat, which focuses on the Armenian genocide of 1915 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: New legislation that grants the gun industry immunity from lawsuits. Guest: Fox Butterfield, National News Desk reporter for the New York Times 2115-2300 *BBCR3 Late Junction: Fiona Talkington introduces a performance of Terje Rypdal's Lux Aeterna, recorded live at the Molde Jazz Festival in Norway in July 2000. Written to celebrate the installation of the new state-of-the art organ in the Molde church, the work exploits its full potential in terms of both traditional and programmed sounds which are contrasted by interventions from four soloists, including Rypdal himself on guitar, and the Bergen Chamber Ensemble UT TUE APRIL 15 TUESDAYS Cambodia Khmer New Year Hinduism India Mahavir Jayanti Jainism Korea North Sun/Kim Il Sung's Birthday Laos Laotian New Year (Pi Mai) Malaysia Declaration of Malacca, Historical City Thailand Taleung Sok Buddhism (Theravada) 0000-0100 *KGOU A Taste Of Passover: Recorded live in New England Conservatory's Jordan Hall, A Taste of Passover features Theodore Bikel, David Levine, and Chasia Sega, and includes homespun and concert versions of a wide variety of music from the Passover repertoire. The program features not only beautiful and uplifting music, but also favorite Passover drinking tunes, zany seder songs, and delightfully entertaining segments, such as instructions for cooking the perfect matzo ball 0005-0100 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Part One of Gardens of Illusion. Andre Lenotre, the greatest landscape architect of the 17th century France, designed the gardens of Versailles and Fontainebleau. He saw his gardens as microcosms of the world, hymns to Reason. Two hundred years later, in a more democratic era, Frederick Law Olmsted designed Central Park in New York and Mount Royal in Montreal. Philip Coulter profiles both men and looks at what their gardens and parks say about two very different worlds [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0200-XXXX *KING Live by George from the Kirkland Performance Center. George welcomes the Abraxas String Quartet, a preview of "Bach Jazzed" at Town Hall and the Tacoma Concert Band 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: How the geography and the politics of the Middle East were shaped by the Allies during and after World War I. A talk with David Fromkin, author of the bestseller "A Peace to End All Peace" 0300-0400 *KQED World Affairs Council: "Alternatives to Economic Globalization: A Better World is Possible." Tonight's speaker is Vandana Shiva, founder and director of the Research Foundation for Science, Technology, and Natural Resource Policy in New Delhi, India. This program presents views on alternatives to economic globalization at the local, national, regional and international levels. It explores how to create institutions that advance democracy, basic rights, and ecological sustainability and offer new policies for rebuilding economies for a more just, equitable, and sustainable world 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Before the war they flocked to Iraq from across the Mideast, North Africa and the pacific. Now some are heading home defeated while others keep fighting coalition troops. The ethos of Muslim brotherhood % 1406-1500 *WPRi The Connection: The conservative doctrine of pre-emptive deterrence envisions a Middle East kept in check by a muscular American foreign policy. On The Connection after nine, critics warn that it's a recipe for a revolution in the Arab world % 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Voices: Iain Burnside and the art critic Waldemar Januszczak visit Tate Britain, matching up paintings with songs. Includes pictures by Blake, Turner and Millais, with songs by Strauss, Debussy, Mendelssohn and Leonard Bernstein 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: In the wake of the war in Iraq, some claim it has outlived its usefulness, others argue it is even more vital today than ever. On The Connection after ten, it's an open session on the future of the U.N.'s inner sanctum % 1700-1800 *WBOI Tech Nation: Moira Gunn speaks with Ed Viesturs, the expedition leader featured in the 1996 IMAX documentary of Everest. They'll talk about the technology he evolved for peak performance and about his personal quest to climb the 12 highest mountains in the world - all without supplemental oxygen. Moira will also speak with gambling expert James Swain. We'll find out why the high-tech security of Las Vegas casinos became interesting to the government post 9/11 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: AFGHANISTAN: Guest: Ambassador Ishaq Shahryar, Afghanistan Ambassador to the Unites States. The Taliban is gone but the American military is not. We will talk to the ambassador from Afghanistan about his country and the strides that have been made towards establishing a democracy % 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Jonathan Harris talks with Tenzin Robert Thurman, the first Westerner to be ordained as a Tibetan Buddhist Monk, about his unique and heartening take on the conflict in Iraq and how to handle it, both personally and as a society; and Jenn Ramage talks with Mark Hermann a frequent contributor Mother Jones, Spin and Harper's. His new book is called Searching for El Dorado: A Journey into the Heart of the South American Rainforest on the Tail of the World's Largest Gold Rush. Intrigued by the cultural, economic and environmental fallout of a five-hundred-year gold rush, Marc Herman traveled to the rainforests of Guyana, where he found the international corporations that fail to alleviate the area's poverty--despite their tremendous technological and political power 1800-2100 *BBCR2 various music series; see also DAY 1800-1900 *BBCR2 Howard Goodall's... Bafta winning broadcaster and one of the country's most sought after composers, Howard Goodall presents his first series for BBC Radio 2. Each programme takes a theme and mixes music of all styles and of all era's [sic], emphasising Howard's long held belief that the interplay between different musical traditions is a wholly creative and positive one and that there are surprising similarities and connections between Concert Hall, TV, Film and folk music from around the world. Guests include Vanessa Mae, Michael Nymann, Richard Rodney Bennett, organist Carlo Curley and BBC Young Musician of the Year, the brilliant 12 year old violinist Jennifer Pike. Programme Seven: Tonight's theme is 'Off The Beaten Track' with Debussy, Strauss, Bach and Hoffnung providing musical one-offs 1900-2000 *BBCR4 The World After The War: The bombers have dropped their payloads. The tanks have rolled in. The statues have fallen. But what will be the wider repercussions of the Iraq War? Radio 4 and the World Service will jointly broadcast an hour-long special discussion. Robin Lustig brings together a panel of top BBC news correspondents from around the world to analyse the future shape of the world order. More has changed than just control of Iraq. International diplomacy has been badly damaged. The Middle East and the Muslim world has grown increasingly suspicious of the West. Europe has been divided. The US has demonstrated unparalleled military might - but its battle against terrorism and weapons of mass destruction has not been won. Robin Lustig and the panel will respond to e-mails from listeners as they look ahead at the consequences of these profound changes. What do they mean for global security? For peace in the Middle East? For the transatlantic relationship? For the future of Europe? And for the world's economy? And they'll be hosting a live webchat after the programme. So join the discussion as we look ahead to The World after the War 1930-2030 *BBCR2 Tonight I'm Yours Programme Three. It Had To Be You: A look at Rod's career spanning the 80s and 90s and up to today, including reuniting with Ronnie Wood and Jim Cregan for the 'Unplugged' album, recording Downtown Train and the enormous success of 'It Had To Be You: The Great American Songbook'. The programme will also look at Rod's legacy as a songwriter and explore where his career will go next. Contributors will include Roderick David Stewart, Rob Dickins, Arnold Stiefel, Clive Davis, Kelley Jones, Ron Wood. Music to include Baby Jane, People Get Ready, Downtown Train, Have I Told You Lately, Cigarettes And Alcohol and It Had To Be You [Rod Who, you might well ask] 2006-2100 *WBOI The Todd Mundt Show: The Yakuza, Japan's organized crime syndicate, has been called a blend of the Mafia, the Masons, and the Ku Klux Klan. With over 80 thousand members, it dwarfs its US counterpart. We delve into the Japanese underworld 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: According to Kathleen Dunn's guest after three, the war in Iraq demands a rethinking of the international rules of conduct. The outcome could mean less power for neutral, well- meaning human rights groups and more for big-stick-wielding states. Guest: Kenneth Anderson, a law professor at American University and a research fellow at the Hoover Institution, Stanford University; Legal Editor, "Crimes of War"; Contributor to The New York Times Magazine. His article, "Whose Rules of War?" appeared on the April 13 issue of the magazine 2030-2100 *BBCR2 Branford Marsalis Presents... Programme Six. Max Roach - We Insist! Freedom Now Suite: The benchmark guide to the classic jazz sets, telling the stories behind the recordings of some of the best known, best selling and best loved jazz albums ever made. Presented by Branford Marsalis. This third series of Modern Jazz Classics with Branford Marsalis is a series for jazz lovers and jazz novices alike, offering an introduction to some of the greatest music and artists in jazz. The recordings covered during this six-part series range from Max Roach's controversial late-50s civil rights statement, Freedom Now Suite, to Wayne Shorter's seminal mid-60s, Speak No Evil, to Blue Light Til Dawn, singer Cassandra Wilson's early 90s hit 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: With the war in Iraq winding down, U.S. foreign policy concerns are shifting toward Syria. Kathleen Dunn and her guest discuss why. Guest: Gary Gambill, editor Middle East Intelligence Bulletin Research Associate Middle East Forum UT WED APRIL 16 WEDNESDAYS Sri Lanka Bak Poya; Puerto Rico José de Diego's birthday 0000-0100 *WCPN Why This Night: A Passover Special: Host Larry Josephson and Rabbi Ismar Schorsch, Chancellor of the Jewish Theological Seminary, discuss the Seder, a ritual meal that recounts the escape of the Jews from slavery in Egypt and their eventual arrival in the Promised Land. The conversation includes the history, liturgy and foods of Passover, and is intermixed with a selection of sacred and secular Jewish music 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: From Roy Thomson Hall, the Toronto Symphony Orchestra with conductor Gennady Rozhdestvensky and his son, violinist Alexander Rozhdestvensky, in a concert of Russian music. The program includes works by Rimsky-Korsakov, Schnittke and and Rachmaninoff 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Andre Lenotre, the greatest landscape architect of the 17th century France, designed the gardens of Versailles and Fontainbleau. He saw his gardens as microcosms of the world, hymns to Reason. Two hundred years later, in a more democratic era, Frederick Law Olmsted designed Central Park in New York and Mount Royal in Montreal. Philip Coulter profiles both men and looks at what their gardens and parks tell us about two very different worlds 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: The Japanese underworld -- the Yakuza 0106-0200 *MichR The Connection: The conservative doctrine of pre-emptive deterrence envisions a Middle East kept in check by a muscular American foreign policy. Critics warn that it's a recipe for a revolution in the Arab world % 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: GANGSTERS: "As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to be a gangster," declares Henry Hill at the beginning of GoodFellas. Perhaps our guests tonight might have echoed this sentiment by saying, "As far back as I can remember, I always wanted to study gangsters." We will examine the often ugly but always gripping history of the Chicago Mafia with GUS RUSSO, author of The Outfit: The Role of Chicago's Underworld in the Shaping of Modern America, and others 0206-0300 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: The conservative doctrine of pre-emptive deterrence envisions a Middle East kept in check by a muscular American foreign policy. On The Connection after nine, critics warn that it's a recipe for a revolution in the Arab world % 0300-0400 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Steven Pinker, psychologist of language at MIT 0306-0400 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: In the wake of the war in Iraq, some claim it has outlived its usefulness, others argue it is even more vital today than ever. On The Connection after ten, it's an open session on the future of the U.N.'s inner sanctum % 1406-1500 *NPR DIANE REHM: NIH Human Genome Project: This week, the National Institutes of Health announces the completion of its 15-year effort to map and sequence the human genome. We'll talk about what this achievement means for the future of medicine and science. Dr. Elias Zerhouni, Director, National Institutes of Health; Dr. Francis Collins, Director, National Human Genome Research Institute % 1406-1500 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: The Lost Cultural Treasures of Baghdad: Dick Gordon takes us inside the looted Iraq National Museum and visits the ashes from the torching of Baghdad's National Library. What happens when art of the cradle of civilization disappears % 1506-1600 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: The Shot Heard 'Round the Hill: Last week the House authorized legislation that would provide the gun industry a bullet-proof vest against lawsuits. Some of those lawsuits allege that manufacturers knowingly distribute guns to criminals % 1606-1700 *WBOI Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Fareed Zakaria about trying to bring democracy to Iraq. His new book is called--"The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad". Zakaria is the editor for Newsweek International 1606-1700 *WFPL Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Fareed Zakaria is the editor of Newsweek International and a political analyst for ABC News. His new book is "The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad". In the book, he argues that the spread of democracy does not always produce a corresponding growth of liberty. He gives examples of democratic elections that resulted in the election of dictators and autocrats. And he argues for a restoration of balance between democracy and liberty. Also, novelist Diana Abu-Jaber. She is the author of Crescent, a new book about a single Arab-American woman chef in Los Angeles. Her previous novel "Arabian Jazz" won the Oregon Book Award. Abu-Jaber grew up in America in a traditional Jordanian household. Abu-Jaber is a writer-in-residence at Portland State University. (NPR) 1606-1700 *MichR Fresh Air: Fareed Zakaria about trying to bring democracy to Iraq. His new book is called-- "The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad." Zakaria is the editor for Newsweek International 1606-1700 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Exporting Democracy: Will Iraqi democracy mean Iraqi freedom? As the U.S. prepares to change the politics of Iraq, we reexamine the concepts of freedom and democracy. Fareed Zakaria, editor of Newsweek International and author of The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad % 1700-1800 *WHYY ONE PEOPLE, MANY STORIES - PASSOVER: special 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: THE PRESS GOES TO WAR: Guests: Margaret Kennedy, Correspondent VOA TV; Alex Belida, VOA Pentagon correspondent. A month into the war in Iraq, is the Pentagon's more open policy with the press working as both the military and reporters hoped it would? How have the reporters handled themselves and their responsibility to the soldiers they are embedded with? % 1706-1800 *WBEZ Odyssey: Sexuality and the Public Sphere 1706-1800 *MichR Todd Mundt: The beauty and allure of backyard astronomy 1900-1945 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: The Emerging Mind. The Artful Brain: Professor VS Ramachandran delivers the third of this year's Reith Lectures, revealing what baby seagulls have to teach us about Picasso. [Rptd Sat 2115] 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: Thirty years ago, four combat photographers took off to cover fighting in Laos, and they vanished. We'll talk to Richard Pyle, The Associated Press' former Saigon bureau chief, about the story of the Saigon press corps % 1906-2000 *WHYY FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: We talk with Fareed Zakaria about trying to bring democracy to Iraq. His new book is called "The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad". Zakaria is the editor for Newsweek International 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Fareed Zakaria about trying to bring democracy to Iraq. His new book is called-- "The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad." Zakaria is the editor for Newsweek International 2006-2100 *WBOI The Todd Mundt Show: The hobby of stargazing has never been so powerful. With the latest technology, amateurs are changing the science of cosmologoly [sic] itself with their discoveries. We'll explore the beauty and allure of backyard astronomy 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Life in 21st century Cuba with William Vocke (VOH- key) from the Institute of World Affairs in Milwaukee. He recently toured Cuba and will talk about life there today. Guest: William Vocke, (VOH-key) Executive Director INSTITUTE OF WORLD AFFAIRS 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Charlie Gillett Without Frontiers: Songs about the rain with music from Van Morrison, Rodney Crowell and Johnny Nash 2230-2300 *BBCR4 All The Right Notes, Not... ...Necessarily In The Right Order: Series about humour in classical music. Rainer Hersch profiles Gerrard Hoffnung, whose symphonic caricatures remain among the funniest recordings ever produced 2300-2400 *WHYY FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: Fareed Zakaria about trying to bring democracy to Iraq. His new book is called "The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad". Zakaria is the editor for Newsweek International UT THU APRIL 17 THURSDAYS Israel Pessah (first day) Jewish Maundy Thursday Syrian Arab Republic Evacuation Day 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: The beauty and allure of backyard astronomy 0106-0200 *MichR The Connection: Dick Gordon takes us inside the looted Iraq National Museum and visits the ashes from the torching of Baghdad's National Library. What happens when art of the cradle of civilization disappears % 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: Dick Gordon takes us inside the looted Iraq National Museum and visits the ashes from the torching of Baghdad's National Library % 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Fareed Zakaria about trying to bring democracy to Iraq. His new book is called-- "The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad." Zakaria is the editor for Newsweek International 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: "Refugia." Let's call it Refugia, this new global "nation" of refugees. It's not on any map, of course; it's everywhere: Thirty million displaced people. That's the population of Canada. Somalis in camps in Kenya; Afghans in Pakistan… We'll hear from modern refugees from a number of countries describing the agonies and challenges of statelessness, as well as from policy makers on the frustrations of dealing with it 0300-0400 *KBYU Callas - In Her Own Words: Since Maria Callas' death in September of 1977, there have been twenty-nine books, three television documentaries and countless magazine articles about her life and her art. Her recordings continue to sell as well as those of today's opera stars. It would not be an overstatement to say that Callas is one of the most important performing artists of the 20th century. Classical 89 is pleased to present a four-hour portrait in sound of the life and career of Maria Callas. Each program includes taped interviews with the soprano, some never before made public. Musical highlights include Tosca with Tito Gobbi and Renato Ciosi; Medea with Leonard Bernstein; Lucia di Lammermoor with Herbert von Karajan; Rigoletto with Giuseppe di Stefano. Hear arias from Cavelleria Rusticana, Il Corsaro, Armida, Macbeth, Norma, La Gioconda, Turandot, La Sonnambula, Madama Butterfly, La Triaviata, Un Ballo in Maschera, I Vespri Siciliani and many more [1 of 4 Thursdays] 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Last week the House authorized legislation that would provide the gun industry a bullet-proof vest against lawsuits. On The Connection after ten, some of those lawsuits allege that manufacturers knowingly distribute guns to criminals 1406-1500 *WHYY RADIO TIMES with Marty Moss-Coane: Newsweek International editor Fareed Zakaria talks about democracy's dark side and his new book, "The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad." % 1406-1500 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: The Shia of Iraq: An Ancient Minority's Modern Challenge: The centuries' old Sunni-Shia divide is rooted in politics, history and doctrine. In post-war Iraq, the latest chapter is being written. Dick Gordon in Baghdad puts the ancient split into current context % 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Music Restored: Lucy Skeaping presents a programme of 18th century Jesuit mission music from the area now known as Bolivia. The concert, recorded at the Wigmore Hall, London, features music of the Chiquitos and Moxos Indians and by the missionary composer Domenico Zipoli. Florilegium is directed by Ashley Solomon, with Emma Kirby and Gabriela di Laccio (sopranos), Tim Massa (countertenor), Andrew Kennedy (tenor) and Thomas Guthrie (bass) 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM: Athans and Bishop: National Geographic's Surviving Everest: To honor the 50-year anniversary of the first successful ascent of Mount Everest, and the 40-year anniversary of the first American ascent, National Geographic produced a 2-hour television event uniting the sons of mountain pioneers Sir Edmund Hillary, Tenzing Norgay Sherpa and Dr. Barry Bishop for a trek to the top of the world. Brent Bishop and mountaineering expert Pete Athans join Diane to talk about 50 years of exploring Everest % 1506-1600 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: War from the Ground Perspective with Ann Scott Tyson. Christian Science Monitor correspondent Ann Scott Tyson accompanied the 3rd Infantry Division from Fort Stewart Georgia to Baghdad via Kuwait and the Iraqi desert. Now she is back home. We'll talk with her about war from the soldier's perspective % 1530-1600 *BBCR4 The Material World: Quentin and his panel of experts will answer listener's fascinating science questions 1606-1700 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Cuba: Recently in Cuba, there have been mass arrests and summary executions of dissidents. Could these actions turn Cuban President Fidel Castro into the next Saddam Hussein? Wayne Smith, Senior Fellow, "The Cuba Project" Center for International Policy; former Chief of the US Interests Section in Havana Cuba (1979 -1982); Maria Werlau, Senior Advisor, Cuba Study Group; Advisor to the Cuban American National Foundation; also CEO, Orbis International; Dan Erikson, Director, The Cuba Program, Inter-American Dialogue; Kevin Whitaker, Director, Office of Cuban Affairs, State Department % 1606-1700 *WFPL Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Charles Sennott is foreign correspondent for The Boston Globe. He was recently in northern Iraq where he traveled independently with a group of journalists. He was in Kirkuk when allied forces took the city from Baathist control. In Afghanistan, in 2001 Sennott traveled with the Northern Alliance. He is also the author of the new book "The Body and The Blood: The Holy Land's Christians At the Turn of a New Millennium". (PublicAffairs). Sennott was Middle East bureau chief for The Globe 1700-1800 *WBOI WBOI Magazine Special: Speaking of Faith -- Stories Behind The Story: In the coinciding holidays of Easter and Passover, the core stories of two world religions are celebrated. This program explores imaginative ways of approaching ancient texts to give them modern sense. Guests include Rabbi/author Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, minister/actress Linda Loving, and provocative reflections of Duke University theologian Richard Hays. The hour also features readings from the Bible, words of a 14th Century mystic, and poetry from Wendell Berry. Krista Tippett hosts 1700-1800 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Sean O'Keefe Administrator, NASA: NASA`s strategic plan % 1706-1800 *WHYY THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: In the race to fly, the smart money was on Samuel Langley. He had the U.S. War Department and all the resources of the Smithsonian Institution behind him. So how did two nobodies from Ohio beat him to the punch? 1706-1800 *MichR Todd Mundt: Historian Jim Tobin talks about the Wright Brothers' historic flight. Vs. Leonardo too 1706-1800 *WBEZ Odyssey: The history of "facts": is a fact the same thing across disciplines? 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Mara Freeman felt that the only people going to independent and foreign news sources for information about the war were people that already disagreed with American policies and war coverage. In attempt to be more effective than "preaching to the choir", she started a program called Beyond CNN. A group of concerned citizens was alarmed by the handling of toxics at Ford Ord, and began agitating for the defense industry to take proper care of the harmful substances. They've since found other areas of concern in their area, so they've renamed their organization the Monterey Bay Toxics Project. These are two sets of local people that are working to inform their neighbors about what's going on in the Central Coast, and on today's Talk of the Bay, Robin Roberts finds out how they did it, and what they're doing right now 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): The history behind the Congolese Civil War and discusses the politics and prospects for peace. Guests: Kambale Juakali, managing editor of Graben newspaper; Stephanie Wolters, chief news editor at Radio Okapi; Jacques Depelchin¸ executive director of the nonprofit Ota Benga International Allience for Peace in the Congo and a visiting scholar at UC Berkeley's Institute for International Studies; and Adam Hochschild, lecturer at the UC Berkeley Graduate School of Journalism 1806-1900 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: The war in Iraq has been called the first digital war -- and not necessarily because of the weapons. From bloggers to hackers to news sites, the Internet broke new ground in disseminating information. But questions and concerns include security, accuracy and the cost. The topic is The War Online % 1900-1930 *BBCR4 What If...? Counterfactual history series with Professor Chris Andrew. If America had lost the War of Independence, as George III confidently expected, history might have turned out differently [*might* have?? duh!] 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Costing The Earth: Nature Fights Back: Was last year's oil spill off the coast of Galicia the disaster it seemed? How quickly can nature recover from the mistakes of man? 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Mark Lamarr's Shake, Rattle & Roll" 14th programme in his 17-part rock 'n' roll series, playing tunes by the Teen Kings, the Four Kings, the Kingbeats and the Kings of Rhythm among others 2006-2100 *WBOI TODD MUNDT SHOW: See 1706 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Thousands of priceless artifacts were destroyed last week during a period of civil unrest in Iraq. Kathleen Dunn's guest says that for the archaeological world, "it is a disaster of major proportions." Guest: Paul Zimansky, archaeologist at Boston University 2006-2100 *KQED FRESH AIR See 1606 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Jammin': Rowland Rivron presents the third in a six-part musical comedy panel show where there are no teams, no scores and no competition. Just five friends in the garage who are passionate about music 2115-2300 *BBCR3 Late Junction: Fiona Talkington introduces a performance of Arvo Part's St John Passion by Tonus Peregrinus, under the direction of Antony Pitts. Written in 1982y, the work is based on Part's tintinnabuli principle that "the melody and accompaniment is one", resulting in a powerful and compelling setting of the ancient Passion story 2200-XXXX *KCRW The Four Questions, a selection from Jewish Stories 2200-2230 *BBCR4 I Think I've Got A Problem: The everyday story about a man who can't stop himself breaking into song starring Suggs as Tom Caine and Bob Monkhouse as Dr Boone. Episode 4: After falling over and knocking himself out, Tom - and the band in his head - awakes to find himself in a strange world where castrati singers are all the rage. Written by Andrew McGibbon and Nick Romero. Music by Andrew McGibbon, Nick Romero and Suggs 2230-2300 *BBCR4 All The Right Notes, Not... ...Necessarily In The Right Order. Rainer Hersch profiles the great comedians of classical music. With performers Anna Russell, Peter Schickele, Spike Jones, and Andre Previn with Morecambe and Wise 2300-2400 *WHRB HISTORICALLY INFORMED PERFORMANCES: Interview with guest Robert Levin, Dwight P. Robinson, Jr., Professor of the Humanities at Harvard UT FRI APRIL 18 FRIDAYS Good Friday; Zimbabwe Independence Day 0000-0100 *WABE St. Mark Passion: a dramatic musical journey inspired by a theatrical recreation of the Passion that was staged in Oslo in March 2002. The spoken biblical text is read in modern English. Bach's music is sung in German by the Scandinavian soloists and played by the Norwegian Baroque Orchestra under the direction of English choirmaster-conductor Edward Higginbottom 0000-0200 *WOIf Third Thursday Jazz: A special live broadcast from the studios at Iowa Public Television in Johnston. Trumpeter Jim Oatts, director of the Des Moines Big Band, will be leading a sextet of some of the finest jazz musicians in Iowa 0000-0200 *WQXR WQXR Presents New York Philharmonic [non]Live! This broadcast will be tape delayed from a performance in March. Mstislav Rostropovich Conductor; Konstantin Lifschitz Piano. Bernstein Slava! (A Political Overture); Prokofiev Piano Concerto No. 3; Henri Dutilleux Timbres, espace, mouvement; Lutoslawski Concerto for Orchestra [This month only back to 0000 start and NOT the program previously listed!] 0000-0200 *KBYU NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: See DAY for more stations 0005-0100 *CBCR1 IDEAS: We are fascinated by the world of secret agents and counterintelligence. Our own spies are heroes fighting a secret war so that the rest of us can sleep soundly; those who spy for our enemies are traitors. What makes a spy? And these days, whom do you spy on when you're not sure who the enemy is? Philip Coulter goes spying [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: Historian Jim Tobin talks about the Wright Brothers' historic flight 0106-0200 *MichR THE CONNECTION: The Connection: The centuries' old Sunni-Shia divide is rooted in politics, history and doctrine. In post-war Iraq, the latest chapter is being written 0130-0200 *KQED Pacific Time with host Nguyen Qui Duc: The aftermath of war: The Japanese government volunteered to take the lead in rebuilding of Afghanistan after the Taliban was driven out. Does their experience hold lessons for recovery in Iraq? And Vietnamese remember their war nearly 28 years after it ended. As SARS continues to spread, we'll hear how Asian airlines are being affected; and a doctor on the front lines of the outbreak in Asia reads from her journal. And a Filipino environmentalist wins a major award for his work helping to clear up a mountain of trash 0200-0230 *RFPI CONTINENT OF MEDIA confirm new time +7445 0200-0300 *WQXR VOCAL SCENE: A Leonard Warren Tribute: The great American baritone Leonard Warren was born 92 years ago on April 21, and George Jellinek pays tribute to his impressive art on this Vocal Scene edition 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE GENERATION OF SEPTEMBER 12: Our guest tonight is STEVEN BRILL, a distinguished lawyer whose now-defunct magazine Brill's Content attempted (and failed) to revolutionize coverage of the American media. Now a columnist with Newsweek, Brill has exhaustively covered post-September 11 America and the rapid evolution of what we now call "homeland security." From John Ashcroft and Tom Ridge to the low-level agents patrolling our border, his new book After: How America Confronted the September 12 Era examines the new age in which we now live. How has America changed? Is this really a new era? 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: Dick Gordon in Baghdad explores the deep roots of the ancient split between Shiite (SHEE-ayt) and Sunni (SOO-nee) Muslims, and how history is already writing the next chapter % 0206-0300 *KQED FRESH AIR: see Thu 1606 0300-0400 *KQED Alternative Radio: "Collateral Damage: War and Propaganda." In an interview with AR's David Barsamian, noted linguist and political analyst Noam Chomsky examines the use of language during wartime 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: A look at war from the ground perspective with Ann Scott Tyson, until a few days ago an embedded reporter with the 3rd Infantry Division % 1306-1400 *WMUB WMUB Forum - The role of art in a time of war (with Edna Southard of the Miami Art Museum) 1340-XXXX *WCPN Morning News: Commemorates the 100th birthday of Eliot Ness with a look back at his time as safety director for the city of Cleveland; also, a talk with the producer of The 14th Victim, a documentary on Cleveland's Kingsbury Run murders of the 1930s 1400-1430 *BBCR4 Room Of The Passion: A Meditation For Good Friday: Catholic writer Margaret Hebblethwaite and Jesuit priest Carlos de la Cruz reflect on the events of Jesus's passion as they describe the 18th century collection of Indian carvings in the Room of the Passion in Santa Maria de Fe, a former Jesuit Mission in Southern Paraguay. Catholic journalist and writer Margaret Hebblethwaite currently lives in Southern Paraguay, working with base Christian communities in Santa Maria, a rural village of some 3000 inhabitants. She has a sense of the sacredness of the place because of its long history of suffering, initially of the indigenous people at the hands of the colonisers, and more recently of the peasants at the hands of government during the oppressive military regime of President Stroessner. Santa Maria is the site of a Jesuit reduccion (mission) made famous by the Roland Joffe film 'The Mission'. The Room of the Passion is filled with extraordinarily moving statues of the Passion of Christ carved by the indigenous in the 18th century. Margaret talks with Carlos de la Cruz, a Jesuit who was parish priest in Santa Maria until five years ago and now works as a spiritual director. They reflect on the history of the reducciones, the Holy Week of Pain under the Stroessner dictatorship, and what happens today in this rural community as they recall Jesus' journey to his crucifixion 1430-1500 *BBCR4 Stabat Mater: Christopher Cook introduces an emotional account of the Easter story as portrayed by a masterpiece of religious poetry. The Stabat Mater Dolorosa allows us to see the crucifixion from the agonising perspective of the Virgin Mary, a scene full of painful resonances with the experiences of modern-day mothers who themselves have suffered the ultimate pain of losing a son. Their story is told alongside contributions from writers, historians, musicians and religious figures 1430-1500 *KUNM Southwest Coffeehouse features Rob Baldwin, author of the brilliant new novel "The Water Thief." Host Ron Chapman leads a conversation that examines loss, grief, redemption and forgiveness through the lens of fiction but directed toward our culture and current affairs. Baldwin offers insightful perspectives with a gentle touch. Locally produced by Leslie Clark and Ron Chapman, Southwest Coffeehouse won the 2002 award for Best Feature from the New Mexico Broadcasters Association. Recorded at Albuquerque's Westside Barnes and Noble 1430-1500 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: Guest host Jeanette Kelly travels to the town of Alfred in Eastern Ontario. This small farming community also doubles as the set of FranCoeur - the first Franco-Ontarian drama series or 'teleroman' [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: A Bit Of The Other: Michael Rosen presents the programme about the way we speak. As the sap rises and the new shoots burgeon, some reflections on the language of sex and seduction [Rptd Sun, 1930] 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Jazz Legends: Henry "Red" Allen: Julian Joseph and John Chilton survey the recorded output of this celebrated New Orleans trumpeter. Selections include Stingaree Blues with King Oliver, Nagasaki with Fletcher Henderson, Ride, Red, Ride with the Mills Blue Rhythm Band, Sweet Subsitute with Jelly Roll Morton's Seven and I've Got the World on a String from 1957 1500-1600 *WUGA ST. MARK PASSION: Shortly after Johann Sebastian Bach's death in the mid-18th century, his third great Passion- setting, based on the gospel of St. Mark, disappeared. In the mid-19th century, German scholars proposed reconstruction, having uncovered sources for the work's opening and closing choruses as well as a few arias and chorales. Hosted by Saint Paul Sunday's Bill McLaughlin, St. Mark Passion is an hour-long dramatic musical journey inspired by a theatrical recreation of the Passion that was staged in Oslo in March 2002 1506-1600 *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House: Islam in America: Origins of Islam in the United States and the challenges faced by Muslims in this country today. Guests will include Reza Aslan, a University of Iowa Visiting Assistant Professor of Islamic studies who was born in Iran, and Egyptian graduate student Mervat Youssef. Live music by Turkish and Sufi musician Bahri Karacay 1500-1700 *CBCR1 God's Own Jukebox: join host Peter Skinner for God's Own Jukebox. It's a program that brings together people with a common aspect to their lives and asks each one to choose a piece of spiritual music. Since "spiritual" can mean different things to different people, their picks range from Handel's Messiah to the Red Hot Chili Peppers, from U2 to the national anthem of South Africa. Peter asked people who work for humanitarian and relief organizations about their work and the music that moves them and feeds their souls [in case local midday shows are on holiday; +1/2/3/4 hours] 1506-1600 *WPRi All About Food: Before drive-through restaurants, before McDonald's and other fast food restaurants, there was Horn & Hardart. After ten, Jean Feraca and her guest talk about the history, lore, and recipes of the Automat. Guest: Marianne Hardart, great-granddaughter of Automat co-founder Frank Hardart. Co-author (with Lorraine Diehl) of "The Automat: The History, Recipes, and Allure of Horn & Hardart's Masterpiece" (Clarkson Potter) 1530-1600 *BBCWa The Fall Of Saddam: Despite the bluster and bravado from Saddam Hussein and his regime, it took the American-led forces only three weeks to topple him. why was the Iraqi army swept aside with such ease? In this programme Alan Little looks at the key moments of the Iraq war 1600-1700 *KUNI ST. MARK PASSION see 1500; The spoken biblical text is read in modern English, while Bach's music is sung in German by the Scandinavian soloists and played by the Norwegian Baroque Orchestra under the direction of English choirmaster-conductor Edward Higginbottom 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Friday Forum host Angie Coiro (Hour One): "Stolen Artifacts." Forum discusses the looting of Iraqi museums and the market for stolen art works. Guests: Jerome J. Eisenberg, founder and director of Royal Athena Galleries and editor of Minerva: International Review of Ancient Art & Archeology; Sharon Flescher, executive director of the International Foundation for Art Research (IFAR) and editor-in-chief of the IFAR Journal; Peter Landesman, journalist for the New York Times Magazine; and Elizabeth F. Carter, professor of Near Eastern Languages and Cultures at the Cotsen Institute of Archeology at UCLA 1606-1700 *KAZU THE CONNECTION: Live From Baghdad: The Music of a Nation. From 4000 B.C. until the start of Saddam Hussein's rule, Iraq was known for its poetry, music, and art. Dick Gordon brings us the sounds and words of musicians from the Iraqi National Symphony, live from Baghdad % 1700-1800 *KUNI Cathedral Classics with the Dale Warland Singers: There is a grand tradition of singing in church, dating back to time immemorial. At its highest levels of achievement, the sound of a great choir in the perfect acoustical setting is positively ethereal. The internationally-acclaimed Dale Warland Singers create that awe- inspiring sound in Cathedral Classics, a stunningly beautiful music special hosted by Tom Crann. As it has done in anticipation of Easter for many years, the ensemble performs in the reverberant Basilica of Saint Mary in Minneapolis. The concerts are extraordinary, creating an hour of riveting ancient, traditional and contemporary choral originals and arrangements. From the growling basses in the music of Russian masters Golovanov and Chesnokov to the familiar sound of Mozart's Ave Verum Corpus and Poulenc's Mass in G Major, Cathedral Classics sets a tone that is both somber and glorious, perfect for the Easter season 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: IRAQI CHRISTIANS: Guests: Father Roberson, Associate Director, Secretariat for Ecumenical and Interreligious Affairs at the US Conference of Catholic Bishops; Theodore Pulcini, Ph.D., Professor of Religion at the University of Pittsburgh. Chaldeans, Assyrians and other Christians make up a small but important religious minority in Iraq. On this Good Friday we will discuss their past, how they have managed to survive under Saddam and what they hope the future will hold for them % [NOTE: TTA now has a 4- month archive] 1706-1800 *WBEZ ODYSSEY: Film Forum 1706-1800 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: How important are restaurant reviews? The answer to this question varies, but many feel a restaurant reviewer could make or break an establishment - especially a new restaurant. We talk about restaurant reviews with two of Louisville's gastronomic critics - The Courier-Journal's Susan Reigler and Robin Garr of Louisville HotBytes 1706-1800 *MichR Todd Mundt: It's generally accepted in most modern societies that monogamy works because it assures legitimacy - and therefore paternal care - of offspring. There's a tribe in Venezuela where women have more than one mate, and consider their children to have multiple biological fathers 1706-1800 *WBAAa THE CONNECTION: Live From Baghdad: The Music of a Nation. From 4000 B.C. until the start of Saddam Hussein's rule, Iraq was known for its poetry, music, and art. Dick Gordon brings us the sounds and words of musicians from the Iraqi National Symphony, live from Baghdad 1800-1830 *BBCR2 Midnight Train To Georgia: Des'ree presents a four-part profile of soul singer Gladys Knight. This week she will be looking at the move Gladys Knight And The Pips made from Motown to Buddah Records 1806-1900 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: Depleted Uranium / Iraqi Archaeology Update The Department of Defense says ammunition made with depleted uranium gives American fighting forces a clear advantage. Critics say it is a health hazard for troops and the people left living with the aftermath of war. In this hour of Science Friday, we'll look at the case for and against depleted uranium. Plus, recovering the archaeological treasures stolen from museums in Iraq % 1830-2130 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: A pinnacle of Western music and one of the most original music dramas of any age in a deeply moving performance given in the 1998 Proms. Bach's account of the events leading up to the Crucifixion interweaves the narration of Christ's mission and his political fate with mankind's response in a sequence of impassioned and meditative arias and chorales. Bach: St Matthew Passion 2006-2100 *WBOI The Todd Mundt Show: Anthropologists have been studying a tribe in Venezuela where women have more than one mate, and consider their children to have multiple biological fathers. We'll find out how and why this system works 2130-2200 *BBCWa The Fall Of Saddam: Despite the bluster and bravado from Saddam Hussein and his regime, it took the American-led forces only three weeks to topple him. why was the Iraqi army swept aside with such ease? In this programme Alan Little looks at the key moments of the Iraq war 2200-2230 *BBCR4 Great Lives: Series of biographical discussions with Humphrey Carpenter. John Sergeant discusses Arthur Ransome, author of Swallows and Amazons, with biographer Hugh Brogan 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Hot Dog! Tim Marlow investigates America's love affair with the hot dog, hearing tales of secret sauce recipes, sampling the deep fried dog, and investigating the Chicago ketchup controversy 2306-2400 *WMUB WMUB Forum - The role of art in a time of war (with Edna Southard of the Miami Art Museum) 2306-2400 *JPR THE CONNECTION: Live From Baghdad: The Music of a Nation. From 4000 B.C. until the start of Saddam Hussein's rule, Iraq was known for its poetry, music, and art. Dick Gordon brings us the sounds and words of musicians from the Iraqi National Symphony, live from Baghdad UT SAT APRIL 19 SATURDAYS Nigeria presidential elections Swaziland King's Anniversary; Malaysia-Perak Sultan's Anniversary Venezuela Independence Day 0000-0100 *WCNY Syracuse Society for New Music - Fresh Ink: "Lamentations and Praises" John TAVENER: Lamentations and Praises 0000-0300 *WFMU World of Echo with Dave Mandl - "Radio Polyphony", multi-channel broadcast collaboration with WKCR, a live, multi-channel broadcast for multiple radio stations and internet streams. The broadcast will take place between 0100 and 0200 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Tune in for the conclusion of In the Stalin Archives. In 1932, a Communist official in Western Siberia sent a letter to Moscow enclosing a report on hunger in the villages. It described peasants subsisting on "food substitutes," hollow-eyed children with swollen bellies, and a worker who "is starting to slip into psychosis due to starvation." University of Toronto historian Robert Johnson revisits the Stalin era in the light of discoveries made since the archives on Soviet history were opened [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: It's generally accepted in most modern societies that monogamy works because it assures legitimacy - and therefore paternal care - of offspring. There's a tribe in Venezuela where women have more than one mate, and consider their children to have multiple biological fathers 0030-0100 *KBYU About Music: Johann Sebastian Bach and the Parable of the Ten Wise and Foolish Virgins; with Dale Monson, BYU professor of music (Repeated tomorrow morning at 1500) 0100-0200 *WCNY Cinemusic with Chuck Klaus: LEOPOLD STOKOWSKI AT THE MOVIES. Not a displaced "Discography," but a tribute to Stokowski on his birthday. We'll feature selections from the original (and quirky) soundtrack recording of Disney's "Fantasia." 0106-0200 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: How important are restaurant reviews? The answer to this question varies, but many feel a restaurant reviewer could make or break an establishment - especially a new restaurant. We talk about restaurant reviews with two of Louisville's gastronomic critics - The Courier-Journal's Susan Reigler and Robin Garr of Louisville HotBytes 0106-0200 *MichR THE CONNECTION: Live From Baghdad: The Music of a Nation. From 4000 B.C. until the start of Saddam Hussein's rule, Iraq was known for its poetry, music, and art. Dick Gordon brings us the sounds and words of musicians from the Iraqi National Symphony, live from Baghdad O200-0300 *WMNR MIXED BAG «»«»«» Broadway and Film Scores «» Mystery Voice Quiz; An Evening with Jack Paar; Berlin: Easter Parade (film score) 0200-XXXX *WOSUf Sofia Gubaidulina's St. John Passion on "New Dimensions": Performed by St. Petersburg's Mariinsky Theatre Orchestra and Choirs with Valery Gergiev conducting, this outstanding version of J.S. Bach's' St. John Passion was nominated for two Grammys in the categories of Best Classical Composition and Best Choral Performance. Sung in Russian, the piece intertwines episodes of the St. John passion story, playing the part of questions, with corresponding sections from the Apocalypse, also according to St. John, which provides responses to the questions 0200-XXXX *KBYU KBYU-FM SPECIAL PRESENTATION Bach: St. Matthew Passion: William Zukof ct; Thomas Dinan, ct; Mark Bleeke t; Woodrow Bynum, b; Christopher Trueblood, b; Oliver Warren LaVar, Tomothy Risner, Edward Landin, Gregory Larsen, boy sopranos; Thomas Bara, hc; James Richman, portative organ; Choir of Men & Boys of St. Thomas Episcopal Church in New York City; Concert Royal; Dr. Gerre Hancock, cond. 0206-0400 *WBEZ Passport: Indian Sitar master Ravi Shankar 0300-0400 *KQED Commonwealth Club: Bill Gates, Sr., chair and CEO of the Bill and Melinda Gates Foundation. Bill Gates, Sr., who directs the philanthropic endeavors of his famous son and his wife, tells us why this organization is making global health a local and central priority. He explains how they are working hard to bridge the growing gap that exists between the United States and the rest of the world in the areas of wealth, resources, and health. In 2000, the Gates Foundation invested $554.5 million dollars in its global health effort to eradicate vaccine-preventable diseases worldwide 0306-0400 *WSUI Iowa Talks from the Java House: Islam in America: Origins of Islam in the United States and the challenges faced by Muslims in this country today. Guests will include Reza Aslan, a University of Iowa Visiting Assistant Professor of Islamic studies who was born in Iran, and Egyptian graduate student Mervat Youssef. Live music by Turkish and Sufi musician Bahri Karacay 0306-0500 *WPRi All About Food: Before drive-through restaurants, before McDonald's and other fast food restaurants, there was Horn & Hardart. Jean Feraca and her guest talk about the history, lore, and recipes of the Automat. Guest: Marianne Hardart, great- granddaughter of Automat co-founder Frank Hardart. Co-author (with Lorraine Diehl) of "The Automat: The History, Recipes, and Allure of Horn & Hardart's Masterpiece" (Clarkson Potter) 0400-0500 *KUNM Afropop Worldwide, "The Mali Connection." In the first of a two- part series focusing on Mali in West Africa, we hear Western musicians drawn to Mali's ancient and modern music. New works by blues figures Bonnie Raitt and Corey Harris, jazz musicians Ben Alison and Roswell Rudd, singer songwriter Markus James, and English guitarist Justin Adams all make powerful connections with musicians in Mali, from the king of desert blues Ali Farka Touré to American based kora master Mamadou Diabaté. If you have any doubts that the roots of jazz and blues lie in Mali, you need to hear this program 1000-1630 *WCNY An all-request edition of Saturday Classics with your host Bill Shedden. To submit a request anytime, just call our CLASSIC FM Listener Line at 315-234-5081, or e-mail classicfm@wcny.org 1206-1300 *WBOI Connexxion Latina Easter Special: Northeast Indiana's weekly program of Hispanic music and community information, hosted by David Calderon and Rosa Gerra, executive director of the Benito Juarez Cultural Center 1305-1400 *CBCR1 That Saturday Show: It's a four-way clash of cultures. Enter the worlds of orangutans, nudists, skateboarders and curlers [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1405-1500 *CBCR2 The Vinyl Cafe: Host Stuart McLean has a concert recorded a few days ago at the Rebecca Cohn Auditorium in Halifax. Stuart welcomes Chalmers Doane, the man who brought the ukulele to Halifax. Also, the Vinyl Cafe Orchestra, and the Strange Story of Sam and the Disappearing Party Food 1430-1500 *BBCR4 The Indispensables: The Zip: Lynne Truss returns with a new series examining the impact of inventions we now take for granted. James Dyson and Sarah Dunant examine the history of the fastener 1505-1600 *CBCR1 Quirks and Quarks: DNA's Golden Anniversary: 50 Years of the Double Helix. Next week marks the 50th anniversary of one of the most significant events in the history of modern science: the publication of a modest paper by two young researchers named James Watson and Francis Crick [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1500-1530 *KBYU About Music: Johann Sebastian Bach and the Parable of the Ten Wise and Foolish Virgins; with Dale Monson, BYU professor of music 1700-1730 *BBCR3 Jazz File: All Music: To mark the 75th birthdays last year of both John Dankworth and Cleo Laine, Alyn Shipton looked back at their careers, with a special focus on their "All Music" plan, an artistic vision in which music of all genres could co-exist through imaginative programming and teaching at the arts centre they set up at their home in Wavendon in 1969 NOTE: BBC World Service is resuming a more balanced schedule today, but not exactly as previously planned; DAY listings have not yet been updated 1730-1830 *BBCWe PLAY OF THE WEEK: Brideshead Revisited, 1 of 4 1800-XXXX *KUNM "Woman Who Glows in the Dark: A Visit with A New Mexico Curandera." A special presentation of Women's Focus. Elena Avila is an author, actress, grandmother, registered nurse with a master's degree in psychiatric nursing — and she's a curandera. After working as a director of nursing in a psychiatric hospital, she realized that conventional Western medicine leaves out much of what makes up a human being — the soul, the individual's spiritual beliefs, the complexity of human experience, and the need for personalized treatment. Elena began studying curanderismo, the healing tradition that she had grown up with in the barrios of El Paso. This health care system has its roots in the ancient civilization of the Aztecs and is a medicine of the people that incorporates body, mind, emotions, soul, and spirit. Elena will offer a fresh perspective on physical, emotional, and spiritual wellness as she takes listeners on a journey into the world of curanderismo. She'll talk about the history and culture of this ancient medicine and share colorful stories of her own personal journey to find her identity as a healer as well as compelling stories of patients she has treated. Produced by Carol Boss 1830-1900 *BBCWS FOCUS ON AFRICA: Nigerian elexions 1850-1910 *BBCR3 MET OPERA INTERVAL: Twenty Minutes: Letters From The New World: A series of personal talks from recent arrivals in the United States. Passing: Though born in the USA, the novelist Claire Messud has three passports and feels she is "passing" as an American with a cobbled together identity. Is this a problem or a blessing? 1900-2000 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: St Mugg: The irreverent and provocative journalist and broadcaster Malcolm Muggeridge was enormously influential. On the centenary of his birth, Miles Kington examines his legacy 2000-2100 *BBCR2 London Calling: A Tribute To Joe Strummer: When Joe Strummer died suddenly last December the music world lost one of its greatest communicators. Best known as the lead singer of The Clash in the 1970s and 80s, Joe summed up the feelings of generation in a number of classic songs such as White Riot, White Man In Hammersmith and Career Opportunities. His work outside of the classic also included film roles, solo albums and stints as a radio presenter 2006-2100 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: "Refugia." Let's call it Refugia, this new global "nation" of refugees. It's not on any map, of course; it's everywhere 2100-2145 *BBCR3 The Verb: Ian McMillan presents the showcase of new writing, performance and language recorded before an audience at the new National Maritime Museum in Falmouth. With his guests he charts the extraordinary way the language of the sea and ships influences how we talk, and conducts a master-class in nautical speech. There's a specially written drama by the young Cornish playwright Carl Grose, performed by members of Kneehigh Theatre. It's set on the seabed and stars two crabs and Neptune. The travel writer and novelist Philip Marsden, from St Mawes, considers the importance and poetry of names of places: rocks, bays, even buoys in his new piece, also commissioned by The Verb. And Ian McMillan browses through the Bartlett Library, on of Europe's most important collections of maritime books and papers, now berthed at the museum 2100-0400 *KING Bach Around the Clock. Live from Town Hall, with some of Seattle's best musicians playing the music of Bach, his family and his contemporaries 2101-2200 *BBCWa Play Of The Week: Brideshead Revisited To mark the centenary of the renowned British writer, Evelyn Waugh, a new production of his epic novel, both tragic and funny, in four hour-long episodes begins this week 2115-2200 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: The Emerging Mind. The Artful Brain: Professor VS Ramachandran delivers the third of this year's Reith Lectures, revealing what baby seagulls can teach us about Picasso. [Rpt of Wed 1900] 2145-2400 *BBCR3 Hear And Now: Voices Human, Voices Electronic: Following choral pieces by Richard Baker and Tansy Davis, Sarah Walker presents Edward Cowie's first major work to be written during his tenure as composer-in-association with the BBC Singers. The composer talks about his work on Gaia, a 65 minute cantata for voices and instruments which he describes as 'the aural equivalent of a kaleidoscope'; an adventure in natural sounds. Stephen Cleobury conducts the BBC Singers and the Endymion Ensemble. Robert Worby presents the second report from the 'Cut And Splice' festival, held at London's ICA and co-produced with Hear and Now. This week the focus is on Electric Voices, featuring a UK premiere by Charles Amirkhanian, known for his electronic manipulation of words and vocals. Also, pieces by Iris Garrelfs and the 'electroacoustic maverick' Trevor Wishart UT SUN APRIL 20 SUNDAYS Algeria Berber spring; Christian Easter Guinea-Bissau general elections; Zodiac calendar Taurus 0000-0200 *WCNY Choral Traditions with Bonnie Beth Derby: CHORAL FESTIVAL FOR EASTER. With tonight being the Easter Vigil, Choral Traditions presents a service of Evensong for Easter with the Choirs of Saint Paul's Parish in Washington, D.C., the Washington Symphonic Brass and organist Scott Dettra, all under the direction of Jeffrey Smith. Also included will be a performance of the Easter Oratorio, BWV 249, of Johann Sebastian Bach 0000-0400 *KING Bach Around the Clock. Live from Town Hall, with some of Seattle's best musicians playing the music of Bach, his family and his contemporaries -- concludes 0006-0200 *WPRi Higher Ground with Jonathan Overby: From Vilas Hall on the UW- Madison Campus, it's Higher Ground Live with Jonathan Overby. Stay tuned for tonight's special guests -- poet Rusty Russell, Paradise String Band, Praise Fourmation Gospel Quartet, musical clippings from "Godspell" by Lodi High School and a showcase of "Subject To Change" by the Coloma Players 0100-XXXX *KUNM Ear to the Ground. This show won Ear to the Ground special mention in the NFCB Golden Reel Awards for best local music special. This program contains musical content of a graphic nature regarding the smoking of Marijuana, Pot, Mary Jane, Ganja, Herb, Bud, Dank, Skunk and Weed. Music is provided by The Blunt Society, Tabularassa, The B-Side Players, Stove, Robert Bradley's Blackwater Surprise, Last to Know and more 0101-0200 *BBCWS PLAY OF THE WEEK: Brideshead Revisited, 1 of 4 0200-0400 *KCSCf NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: see Fri 0300-0400 *KBYU The Record Shelf: A Collector's Gershwin. In the first of two programs, music of George Gershwin played by the composer and his friends, including the 1924 version of Rhapsody in Blue 0309-0330 HCJB DX PARTYLINE announcing the end of show, and most English from HCJB on May 31 9745 *********** 0330-0400 WRMI VIVA MIAMI: SWL Winterfest special 1 of 2 7385 [3-065] 1130-1200 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Rabbit: For Easter Sunday Sheila Dillon celebrates rabbits, and not the chocolate variety. For thousands of years they were a staple food now they're a taste we've largely lost, but could our appetite for rabbit be returning? 1200-1300 WRMI VIVA MIAMI: SWL Winterfest special 1 and 2 15725 [3-065] 1200-1600 *CBCR2 Choral Concert Easter Sunrise Celebration: Part One (also on CBC TV) comes to you live from the National Art Gallery in Ottawa. Special guest soprano Measha Bruggergosman joins tenor Pascal Charbonneau, along with the Sunrise Chorale, made up of Ottawa's finest choristers, under the direction of Lawrence Ewashko, Iwan Edwards and Kevin Reeves, in a program of music for Easter. Part Two is a performance of J. S. Bach's Mass in B Minor by the Orchestra and Chorus of Collegium Vocale, under the direction of Philippe Herreweghe 1211-1500 *CBCR1 The Sunday Edition: Host Michael Enright talks with historian and economist Niall Ferguson about what lessons, if any, contemporary Americans might learn from the experience of the British Empire. Michael Enright and music whiz Robert Harris pick up on a discussion about opera that they began about a month ago. This time around, they'll talk about opera and musical taste - and play lots of great music. Michael also talks with Dr. Gary Small, who has written a book called "The Memory Bible." It's about memory and Alzheimer's disease. And the search for priceless archives of the Warsaw Ghetto uprising in the ground of the Chinese Embassy in Warsaw [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1300-1400 *BBCR3 BBC Legends: Rubinstein, Part 1: Piers Lane presents the first of two programmes devoted to performances from the BBC Archive by the great Polish pianist Artur Rubinstein. Music includes Chopin studies and a Mazurka, two pieces from Villa-Lobos' A Proce do bebe and Beethoven's Fourth Piano Concerto, with the London Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Antal Dorati 1505-1600 *CBCR1 The Vinyl Cafe: Host Stuart McLean has a concert recorded a few days ago at the Rebecca Cohn Auditorium in Halifax. Stuart welcomes Chalmers Doane, the man who brought the ukulele to Halifax Also, the Vinyl Cafe Orchestra, and the Strange Story of Sam and the Disappearing Party Food [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Between Stones And Stars: Rebecca Elson was a remarkable poet and an astronomer. She died in 1999 aged 39, leaving behind a collection of inspiring poems which cover subjects as diverse as Dark Matter, her husband's boxer shorts and the cancer which was killing her. This celebration of her work and life is presented by David Constantine, with contributions from friends and colleagues, readings by Theresa Gallagher and Penny Whistle, performed specially by Michael Donaghy 1600-1645 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: In Mendelssohn's lifetime his fifth symphony met with some unaccustomed disapproval or disinterest. Stephen Johnson redresses the balance with a contemporary overview 1600-1800 *KGOU Earth, Air, Fire & Water (for Earth Day April 22nd): Four half- hour programs, each one exploring the work of an author known for the study of and appreciation for nature and the environment. Each segment features a revealing look at the author's life as well as portions featuring the authors reading from their works 1600-1800 *WUGA CHORAL ARTS SOCIETY HOLY WEEK CONCERT: Martin Goldsmith hosts this special Holy Week concert with works from Italy, Germany, and the United States, spanning nearly three centuries. The program consists of performances of Verdi's Quattro Pezzi Sacri (Four Sacred Pieces), the Easter portions of Handel's Messiah, Samuel Barber's Prayers of Kierkegaard, and Mark Adamo's Cantate Domino 1645-1730 *BBCR3 Sunday Feature: God's First Englishman: The Venerable Bede, 8th century saint, historian and scientist, spent most of his life in the Northumbrian twin monastery of Wearmouth-Jarrow, yet soon became famous throughout the world. The only Englishman to be admitted into Dante's Paradise, Bede was obsessed by time, tides and the exact dating of Easter. His masterpiece, the Ecclesiastical History of the English People, is widely regarded as the beginning of British history writing and the first attempt to translate the tribes of England into a people. But Bede's wider ambition was internationalist: to unify Celtic, English and Roman Christianity. Professor David Wallace goes in search of the objects, places and traces of 8th century Northumbria and finds a culture as advanced and enlightened as anywhere in Europe. With readings from Bede by Kevin Whately 1700-1800 *KUNM Back Roads Radio. Today we present two programs. "Getting to Work": Work is a primary focus in many of our lives. Whether our work is our passion or our paycheck we all face what it takes to get a job done. This program features a wide range of stories from ranchers to paper-pushers, to individuals who are realizing their dreams. Guests include Wes McKinley, Charles Blume, Marcia Brenden and Linda Vozar Sweet. Also, "Getting What You Ask For": From a children's literature author, to a composer of avant guard music, to a whimsical storytelling professional, this program suggests that if you know what you want, you stand a greater chance of getting it. Or, to extrapolate from Mic Jagger, you may not get what you want, but you get what you need. Featuring Pat Mora, with an excerpt from her book "La Panaderia"; Kent Carter with his music composition "St. Cybard"; and Jay O'Callahan with his dynamic story "The Salmon and the Bird." Program producer and host is Judy Goldberg 1705-1800 *CBCR1 Tapestry: Guest host Cate Friesen talks with Canadian Daniel Taylor, who is one of the world's most accomplished counter-tenors Taylor has found that his most profound sacred experiences come through music [+1/2 hours] 1900-1930 *BBCR4 A World In Your Ear: Surprise presenter. Fi Glover, broadcaster and author of the acclaimed book Travels With My Radio, gets into her carnival costume and tunes into celebrations around the world. We hear about a Chinese water splashing festival, a goose beheading competition in Switzerland and sample some choice cuts from a comedy gala in Adelaide. Fi also looks into plans to start a new liberal radio network in the US, where right wing talk show hosts now dominate the air waves 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: Michael Rosen with Radio 4's programme about words and the way we speak. 3. A Bit Of The Other: As the sap rises and the new shoots burgeon, some reflections on the language of sex and seduction. Plus, does anyone still speak BBC English? 2000-2100 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: This week's speaker is author Wendy Wasserstein 2005-2200 *CBCR1 Cross Country Checkup: SARS. Just when officials thought the severe acute respiratory syndrome was under control in Ontario, a religious group of five hundred has been quarantined. Now Torontonians are being warned to stay home if they have any of the flu-like symptoms. Vancouver is screening airport passengers. Are you worried about SARS? [live in all zones] 2100-2200 *KQED On the Media: The military war on Iraq has changed to a media war as the Bush Administration launches an Arab-language news channel from the skies. Also, the strange case of CNN, which squelched some of the awful truth about Iraq in order to report the rest of the story. That and why we love a car in uniform, next edition of On The Media [or 2130 JIP?] 2200-2230 *CBCR1 WORLD THIS WEEKEND: Impact on French economy of boycott by silly Americans [+1/2/3 hours] 2200-2230 WRMI VIVA MIAMI: SWL Winterfest special 2 of 2 15725 [3-065] 2200-2300 *WGBH The Whole Wide World, Part 6: What do the writers think? 2200-2300 *WBEZ The Whole Wide World, part 6 (PRI): Part six examines the many promises of recovery in electronic technology, common culture, and adaptive instincts for self-preservation 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Something Understood: To Forgive Divine: For Easter Day, Mark Tully's theme is the power of Forgiveness to release and redeem. Resisting trite exhortations to forgive and forget, he considers the difficulties and complexities of forgiveness: the struggles and the setbacks on the way to the freedom forgiveness can bring 2300-2400 *WCNY Discography with Chuck Klaus: STOKOWSKI IN NEW YORK. We'll celebrate conductor Leopold Stokowski's birthday just two days after the fact. During the hour, we'll turn to some spendid recordings he conjured up with the New York Philharmonic during his all-too-brief period with the ensemble in the 1940's. As spendidly transferred to Cala CD's, we'll hear stunning performances of Messiaen's "L'Ascension," as well as music by Wagner 2300-2400 *WBEZ Norman Mailer (Commonwealth Club): Now 80, Norman Mailer remains an icon of American Literature. He has written 32 books, ranging from his first novel, The Naked and the Dead, in 1948 to his just released The Spooky Art, a book about writing. He has twice been awarded the Pulitzer Prize, for The Armies of the Night (1968) and The Executioner's Song (1979). He continues to be outspoken on such subjects as writing, politics, aging and technology. Mailer draws from his experience to shed light on what he sees as the most significant challenge confronting humanity in the 21st century, and what should be done about it 2300-2400 *CAINAN The Changing World: What Remains to be Discovered I 2315-2345 *BBCR4 The Musical Side Of The Family: Horseman Ross Nye was an Australian jackaroo who left his job rounding up cattle deep in the Outback to marry a young concert pianist. Astonishingly, they formed a deep friendship with Claudio Arrau, one of the 20th century's most famous musicians and found themselves accompanying him round the world UT MON APRIL 21 MONDAYS Brazil Tiradentes Day Spain Basque Country Day; Massachussetts Patriots Day Texas San Jacinto Day; Uruguay Landing of the 33 Patriots 0000-0100 *WBEZ The Memoirs of Frank Stanton (Minnesota Public Radio): Narrated by CBS 60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace, the program features Stanton's (who led CBS for 30 years) remembrances of his life and career, as told to the Oral History Department of Columbia University in a series of interviews spanning 10 years 0000-0100 *WCNY Orgelwerke with Bonnie Beth Derby: VICTIMAE PASCHALI LAUDES. In celebrating Easter, tonight's Orgelwerke will present a number of organ works based on the Easter Gregorian Chant "Victimae paschali laudes". Pieces include Charles Tournemire's Improvisation on "Victimae paschali laudes" as reconstructed by Durufle; Jiri Ropek's Variations on "Victimae paschali laudes" and Henri Nibelle's brilliant Toccata on "Victimae paschali laudes". Also included will be the singing of "Victimae paschali laudes" in the Cathedral of Notre-Dame with organist Pierre Cochereau playing a number of short improvisations on the Grand Organ 0000-0100 *CAINAN Speaking of Faith: Just War on Terror 0000-0300 *WNYCa Radio Lab: Memories: Radio Lab looks at the mystery of memory - what our brains retain, forget and keep selectively hidden from us. Six stories that have memory (not home movie nostalgia, but memory itself) at their center 0100-0200 *CAINAN Memoirs of Frank Stanton 0100-0200 *KUSP Another View: Every week, Paul Couture brings you independent non- commercial news, with voices and perspectives that you won't hear in the mainstream media. This week: Tahmeena Faryal of RAWA (the Revolutionary Association of Women of Afghanistan), on conditions in her country one year after U.S. intervention. This speech was recorded at the Rio Theater in Santa Cruz 0100-0200 *WFIU Listening Locally: WFIU is pleased to present live concert recordings of Bloomington's own Camerata Orchestra. This performance showcases the bow and strings of acclaimed violinist and Bloomington native Corey Cerovsek, and features Saint Paul Sunday host Bill McGlaughlin at the podium. Last year, Bill McGlaughlin visited Bloomington to join Corey Cerovsek on stage with the Camerata for Tchaikovsky's Violin Concerto in D, Op. 35 and Elgar's Enigma Variations. In light of this momentous collaboration of an acclaimed public radio host, an established local orchestra, and a local luminary, WFIU was delighted to acquire an exceptional recording of this concert 0200-0300 *KUSP Remarkable Radio: KUSP presents an hour with comedian and author Al Franken. Franken became well known for his work as writer and cast member on "Saturday Night Live." He's also written several best-selling books, including Rush Limbaugh is a Big Fat Idiot. In this entertaining hour, Franken talks about comedy, satire, liberalism, and a range of social and political issues 0200-0300 *CAINAN How Long's Trane Been Gone, John Coltrane IV 0300-0400 *KQED To the Best of Our Knowledge with Jim Fleming (Hour Two): "Salt of the Earth." Homer called salt a divine substance. Salt taxes built empires across Europe and Asia. They even sparked a revolution. In this hour, why salt is no ordinary rock. We'll tell you how it's changed the course of history. Also, the gourmet salt that will cost you sixty bucks for a small bag 0400-0500 *WYSO Speaking of Faith: Stories Behind The Story: In the coinciding holidays of Easter and Passover, the core stories of two world religions are celebrated. Through intelligent conversation and evocative narrative, this program explores imaginative ways of approaching ancient texts to give them modern sense. The hour features readings from the Bible, words of a 14th Century mystic, and poetry from Wendell Berry. Guests include Rabbi/author Sandy Eisenberg Sasso, minister/actress Linda Loving, and provocative reflections of Duke theologian Richard Hays 1300-1600 *BBCR2 Two's On Two: It's common belief that Vienna by Ultravox, Madonna's Crazy For You and Let It Be by the Beatles all reached number one in the UK - not true! They were held off the top spot by records that have failed to remain as popular as the song in the runner-up position. Who were the actors, cartoon characters and soap stars and what were the television and film theme tunes that stopped some of the most enduring radio records reaching the top of the charts? They will all be named, blamed and possibly shamed as Richard Allinson provides the definitive list of these highly popular also-rans in Two's On Two, a three hour programme celebrating some of the best records that never achieved pole position 1305-1330 *BBCWe Solutions: see 1405 1306-1400 *WPRi Tom Clark: There's more to life than television. That's according to Tom Clark's guest after eight who wants you to put down the remote during TV Turnoff Week. Guest: Frank Vespe (VESP-ee), executive director of the TV-Turnoff Network http://www.tvturnoff.org [Clark is retiring at the end of April] 1330-1400 *BBCWe Music Feature: see 1430 1405-1430 *BBCWa Solutions: According to the World Health Organisation more than one billion people have no safe water - that means a quarter of the world's poulation are exposed to water-borne diseases. This series assesses the problems, and investigates possible solutions. 1406-1500 *WPRi The Connection: Iraqis are touring former torture chambers and prisons for signs of missing loved ones. Dick Gordon in Baghdad discusses the human wreckage of a violent regime 1430-1500 *BBCWa The Music Feature: The Radiohead Story: Radiohead tell their own inside story to Steve Lamacq. A chance to hear rare sessions, live recordings and revealing interviews as well as looking forward to the band's new album, released later this year. 1500-1530 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Rabbit: Sheila Dillon celebrates rabbits, and not the chocolate variety. For thousands of years they were a staple food now they're a taste we've largely lost, but could our appetite for rabbit be returning? 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: Easter Parade, Part 2: Edward Seckerson presents the second part of a holiday tribute to Irving Berlin. Including Ella Fitzgerald in "Top Hat", "Follow the Fleet" with Fred and Ginger, and Judy Garland as Hannah Brown in "Easter Parade". Plus the 2nd biggest-selling song of all time - clue: Bing Crosby 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM [non]: Carlos Eire: Waiting for Snow in Havana (Free Press): Born into a wealthy, eccentric Havana family, Carlos Eire was 12 years old when he became one of 14,000 children airlifted to Miami in "Operation Pedro Pan." Now a professor of history at Yale University, Eire has written a book to share his childhood 1600-1800 *BBCR2 Paul McCartney Special: Stuart Maconie presents an exclusive interview with Paul McCartney and music from his Back In The World Tour feature, in this two hour Bank Holiday Monday special. McCartney is back on tour, performing his first UK and European concerts in 10 years. Both the interview and the concert were recorded on 14th April at the Birmingham NIA. Fronting a new band Paul performs his acclaimed and highly successful new show which includes Beatles classics plus hits from his Wings and solo periods. The band features Rusty Anderson and Brian Ray on guitars, Paul 'Wix' Wickens on keyboards and Abe Laboriel Junior on drums 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): History and future of the Kurdish people. Guests: Robert Olson, professor of Middle Eastern History and Politics at the University of Kentucky; Hikmat Fikrat, president of the Kurdish National Congress; and Tuluy Tanc, minister of the Turkish Embassy in Washington DC 1805-1830 *BBCWe SOLUTIONS: see 1405 1830-1900 *BBCWe MUSIC FEATURE: see 1430 1900-1930 *BBCR4 In The Footsteps Of Moses: Edward Stourton explores the 4000-year history of the Jewish people and traces the contemporary relevance of Moses' alleged meeting with God on Mount Sinai 1900-2200 *WFMU Ralph Litwin & Al Podber on Irene Trudel's show: The "Furry Harmonica Brothers" return, bringing some good Ol' Timey music. Ralph and Al have a new album, and will no doubt play a few tunes from it 1905-1930 *BBCWa Solutions: see 1405 1905-2100 *CBCR1 You Give Me Fever: Host Donna Leon explores Love and Springtime on Easter Monday. Composer Kurt Walther will talk about his new orchestral piece Still Life With Frogs - which was inspired by springtime. Also - you guessed it - real frogs, plus a couple who got "that lovin' feeling" many decades ago, and still have it at the ages of 96 and 86 respectively [+1/2/3/4 hours where local programming is vacationing] 1930-2000 *BBCWa The Music Feature: See 1430 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: Mariusa Reyes travels to the small town of Aranda del Duero where after some 60 years Spain seems finally ready to confront an ugly side of its past, as the mass graves from Spain's Civil War are being excavated. Mariusa meets some of the relatives, who had never dared speak out before, let alone hope that their loved ones might be exhumed and given a decent burial. She also meets the mayor, who is one of very few officials prepared to support exhumations financially 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Courtney Pine's Jazz Crusade: Courtney Pine returns with a brand new series of Jazz Crusade, with an emphasis on less talk and more good music. Courtney will be playing his personal pick of the new releases from the international jazz, world and underground club music scenes and discussing some of his favourite projects this year with artists such as Wayne Shorter, Roy Hargrove, Maceo Parker and Soweto Kinch. Expect also some exclusive live music later in the series and Jazz Crusade on the road visiting an international music festival 2030-2100 *WUGA Earth, Air, Fire, and Water is a five-part series featuring nationally known nature writers reading from and talking about their works. The series will air daily, Mon-Fri [what`s the fifth element??? KGOU had it in four parts on Sunday] 2030-2115 *BBCR3 Night Waves: Paul Allen presents a cultural map from "Stroke City". Known to some of its inhabitants as Derry, to others as Londonderry, Northern Ireland's second city was founded in the sixth century and has a past characterised by tumultuous political and social change. Thirty years ago it was at the centre of "the Troubles", but at the beginning of a new millennium regeneration is well underway and the city is inventing a new identity for itself as a centre of cultural life 2106-2200 *WPRi Dave Berkman in for Kathleen Dunn: Populist Jim Hightower joins Dave Berkman to offer his take on the war, the United States and other assorted issues of our day. Guest: "If The Gods Meant Us To Vote, They Would Have Given Us Candidates" 2200-2300 *WHRB 20TH-CENTURY CHORAL MUSIC: Sonic effects and Minimalism 2206-2300 *WPRi Dave Berkman in for Kathleen Dunn: The American consumer's privacy is being threatened by "smart chips" and most of us have no idea they are coming. DAVE BERKMAN sits in and talks with columnist Robyn Blumner about this latest technology. Guest: Robyn Blumner, columnist ST. PETERSBURG TIMES former dir. ACLU FLORIDA 2305-2330 *CBCR1 Home: Attention Jane Farrow fans: the Great Woman of Words and Work is back on the air tonight with a new show called Home. It's irreverent new series that hits us where we live, examining the gap between our idealised vision of what home should be and the slightly different reality. This week: popping the question at a home improvement store, the battle of the thermostat, and the birth of domestic advice [+1/2/3/4 hours] 2330-2400 *CBCR1 That's Capital: Guess who's back? Yes, it's that wacky Al Rae and his merry band of thrifty producers for a second run of "That's Capital!": the personal finance show for people who know nothing about personal finance. On the season premiere: Al Rae's daughter wants to be an "animal saver" when she grows up, but how will they afford it? Al takes a look at saving for your children's education. Matt Tunnacliffe courts confusion as he tries to file his taxes three different ways. And Sara Tate looks at sure fire ways to wind up being audited [+1/2/3/4 hours] UT TUE APRIL 22 TUESDAYS Oklahoma Day [really?]; St. Caius 0000-0100 *WCPN A Taste of Passover: The program invites listeners to participate in the joy and celebratory spirit of Passover. Under the artistic direction of Hankus Netsky, founder and director of the world- famous Klezmer Conservatory Band, A Taste of Passover features a variety of uplifting Passover music, as well as humorous tunes and entertaining segments. Featuring Theodore Bikel, David Levine, and Chasia Sega, along with orchestral, choral and chamber ensembles from the New England Conservatory 0000-0100 *KGOU National Press Club ~ Gale Norton (New Public Lands Initiative): Secretary Norton discusses a new national public lands volunteer initiative that will encourage citizen stewards to take part in work restoring our public lands. Secretary Norton will encourage citizens, organizations, and state, local, and tribal governments to act together to restore and preserve of America's greatest treasures -- our natural and cultural resources. (recorded April 16th) 0005-0030 *BBCWS SOLUTIONS: see Mon 1405 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part One of When the Machine Awakes. Twenty years ago, Montreal writer George Tombs crossed Europe on foot, walking from Dublin to Jerusalem, in a spiritual quest. In this series, co- produced with Ideas' sister program on Radio-Canada, George revisits the pilgrim's way. He meets spiritual people and leading scientists, to find out whether science is a threat to spiritual values, or an ongoing challenge and source of enrichment [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0030-0100 *BBCWS MUSIC FEATURE: see Mon 1430 0106-0200 *WPRi Tom Clark: There's more to life than television. That's according to Tom Clark's guest after eight who wants you to put down the remote during TV Turnoff Week. Guest: Frank Vespe (VESP-ee), executive director of the TV-Turnoff Network http://www.tvturnoff.org [Clark is retiring at the end of April] 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: Iraqis are touring former torture chambers and prisons for signs of missing loved ones. Dick Gordon in Baghdad discusses the human wreckage of a violent regime 0300-0400 *KQED World Affairs Council: "Banking on the Poor." Tonight's speaker is Muhammad Yunus, managing director for the Grameen Bank in Bangladesh. The Grameen Bank makes loans exclusively to poor people - the majority of them women. Although conventional banking asks borrowers to put up collateral - such as a house - the Grameen Bank's borrowers are too poor to have such possessions. Instead, the Grameen Bank's loans are made on the basis of, in the bank's words, "mutual trust, accountability, participation and creativity." Yunus' ideas, which couple capitalism with social responsibility, have promoted the micro-credit concept around the world 0505-0530 *BBCWa SOLUTIONS: see Mon 1405 0530-0600 *BBCWa MUSIC FEATURE: see Mon 1430 1506-1600 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: The Editor's View: War from the editor's desk. A conversation with Steven Coll, managing editor of the Washington Post about editorial dilemmas, the delicate mechanics of leaks, and the Post's decision to back the administration on the war % 1606-1700 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Tech Tuesday: Media Consolidation: The Federal Communications Commission (FCC) will soon decide whether to relax media ownership rules. The likely result is media consolidation, which could further narrow the diversity of broadcast and print media. Bill McConnell, Assistant Editor, Broadcasting and Cable; Michael Copps, Commissioner, Federal Communications Commission (FCC); Kenneth Ferree, Chief, FCC Media Bureau % 1606-1700 *WBEZ Fresh Air: Satirist Harry Shearer 1606-1700 *MichR Fresh Air: How the emphasis on quarterly earnings corrupted Wall Street and Corporate America. A talk with Alex Berenson, financial investigative journalist for The New York Times. He's the author of the new book "The Number." Also satirist Harry Shearer. He's currently starring in the new folk music mocumentary "A Mighty Wind." 1700-1800 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: Worldwide there are 100 monasteries of Trappist monks and 67 of Trappistine nuns. The Abbey of Gethsemani near Bardstown, Kentucky is the oldest Trappist Monastrary in America. Around 300 AD, Christians began to seek solitude as a means of drawing closer to God and coming to love their neighbor. Today people can retreat to the Abbey of Gethsemani and "entertain silence in the heart and listen for the voice of God." (Thomas Merton). Join us on Tuesday as we speak with Morgan Atkinson about his documentary on Gethsemani and Brother Raphael and Brother Paul will also help us learn more about The Abbey of Gethsemani [rpt at 0100] 1700-1800 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Gaylord Nelson, Counselor to the Wilderness Society & Father of Earth Day % 1706-1800 *WHYY THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: Hard times hit the computer maker Hewlett- Packard a few years back. C.E.O Carly Fiorina responded with a bold move that exploded in her face. We'll learn about the high- stakes battle for the soul of Hewlett-Packard 1706-1800 *MichR Todd Mundt: Carly Fiorina and the high-stakes battle for the soul of Hewlett-Packard 1706-1800 *WMUB Fresh Air - Satirist Harry Shearer, one of the stars of the folk music mockumentary A Mighty Wind 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Psychologist Paul Ekman about facial expression and the physiology of emotion. Ekman is professor of psychology in the department of psychiatry and the director of the Human Interaction Laboratory at the University of California Medical School, San Francisco. His latest book is "Emotions Revealed: Recognizing Faces and Feelings to Improve Communication and Emotional Life." 1800-1900 *BBCR2 Howard Goodall's... ...Classical Connections. Music Of The Night: Gilbert and Sullivan, Berlioz, Fauré 1800-2100 *BBCR2 various music series; see also DAY 1805-1830 *BBCWS Masterpiece: The writer Evelyn Waugh was born 100 years ago this year. In the second of two programmes celebrating this centenary Nick Rankin chairs a discussion on Waugh's literary legacy with Waugh's grandson 1806-1900 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: The Patriot Act was passed by Congress to fight terrorism, but more than a year later, it's facing a different kind of battle. American citizens are challenging the law -- at least 89 cities have resolutions condemning it 1806-1900 *WBEZ Worldview: discussing Arab nationalism 1830-2030 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: Cardiff Singers Series: Live from Wigmore Hall, London, a recital by the 1989 winner of the coveted title Cardiff Singer of the World, Dimitri Hvorostovsky, with pianist Mikhail Arkadiev. Mussorgsky: Sunless Cycle; Tchaikovsky: Death (Op.57, No.5); Frenzied Nights (Op.60, No.6); Before I go to sleep (Op.27, No.1); Night (Op.60, No.9); including at 1920-1940 Twenty Minutes: Baritone Cast Adrift: the career of Russian baritone Dmitri Hvorostovsky has taken him all over the world, but where does he belong? His roots are in mother Russia and his house is in London but where is his heart? Is he a baritone adrift? Dmitri Hvorostovsky talks about his melancholy, his lonely travels and of course about beautiful Russia. 1906-2000 *WHYY FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: Terry talks with satirist Harry Shearer. He's one of the stars of the new folk music mockumentary "A Mighty Wind." 1930-2030 *BBCR2 Bing: The Greatest Of Them All? First in a three-part series on the life of Bing Crosby, arguably the greatest entertainer of the twentieth century. Presented by Pat Boone, with help from biographer Gary Giddins, working colleagues Al Rinker, Loyce Whiteman and Mary Carlisle, members of the International Crosby Circle, and featuring the voice and music of the 'Old Groaner' himself. 2000-2030 *BBCR4 2006-2100 *KQED FRESH AIR: Harry Shearer, et al. 2030-2100 *BBCR2 Diggin' Diz: 2003 marks the 10th anniversary of the death of Dizzy Gillespie, trumpeter, composer, vocalist, percussionist and pianist. Whilst acknowledged as one of the prime architects of be- bop, Gillespie was the antidote to that genre's often austere image. He was the be-bopper as showman and, like Louis Armstrong before him, suffered from accusations of 'cheapening' the music. Like Armstrong he was also a musical revolutionary. Programme One: Introduction and the early years in the Carolinas, musical influences from school and the church, trumpet hero Roy Eldridge, joining the Teddy Hill Band, the big break - hired by Cab Calloway, falling out with Calloway and musical experimentation. With contributions from Gillespie biographer Alyn Shipton, bassist Milt Hinton and DG himself plus music featuring Gillespie on trumpet, vocals and jew's harp, Sarah Vaughan, Sidney Bechet, Roy Eldridge and Cab Calloway 2030-2100 *WUGA Earth, Air, Fire, and Water is a five-part series featuring nationally known nature writers reading from and talking about their works. The series will air daily, Mon-Fri 2200-2230 *BBCR4 Robin And Wendy's Wet Weekends: The Heinrich Manouevre: Robin and Wendy are a childless couple who have an unhealthy obsession with the contents of their garage. There they have built Mayfield, a model village which is the centre of their lives. But in suburbia the fun doesn't stop there, battle re-enactments, clinically depressed neighbours and randy German visitors are part of everyday life. Starring Simon Greenall, Kay Stonham, Debbie Stephenson and Phil Cornwell 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Vienna: City Of Music Programme 1: John Suchet visits Vienna to explore this city which was the cultural capital of Europe for 150 years and is still at the centre of classical musical life today. This first programme of the series focuses on Vienna when it was home to Mozart, Haydn and Beethoven 2306-2400 *WHYY FRESH AIR with Terry Gross: Satirist Harry Shearer. He's one of the stars of the new folk music mockumentary "A Mighty Wind." UT WED APRIL 23 WEDNESDAYS Senegal Grand Magal de Touba - Muslim (Mouridism) Iran Arba'in-e Hosseini; Israel Pessah' Jewish; St. George Turkey National Holiday of the Sovereign and his Children 0005-0030 *BBCWS Masterpiece: see Tue 1805 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: One Billion Conversations. Writer Charles Foran explores the emergence of a generation of authors who are changing how Indian literature is viewed, both inside India and around the world. [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: Carly Fiorina and the high-stakes battle for the soul of Hewlett-Packard 0100-0200 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: Trappist monks; see Tue 1700 0106-0200 *MichR THE CONNECTION: re-educating Iraq 0106-0200 *WPRi Tom Clark: Today is Earth Day: One of the organizers of the first Earth Day, Wisconsin's Secretary of State, Doug LaFollette. 0130-0200 *BBCWa Music Review: from the Welsh capital of Cardiff and looks at the musical links between Cardiff and Australia. And we find out about World Web musicians, the first ever wholly web-based international competition for young soloists 0206-0300 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: Live[non] From Baghdad: Re-educating Iraq. The old textbooks taught that four grenades plus three Kalishnikovs make "Seven ways to kill the infidel enemy." With Dick Gordon live from Baghdad, we'll hear the furious debate about who'll make the new lesson plans 0230-0300 *KQED FRESH AIR: Harry Shearer, et al. 0300-0400 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Author Wendy Wasserstein [giggle, giggle] 0306-0400 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: The Editor's View: War from the editor's desk. A conversation with Steven Coll, managing editor of the Washington Post about editorial dilemmas, the delicate mechanics of leaks, and the Post's decision to back the administration on the war 1300-2300 *WQXR Special: Shakespeare`s Birthday Celebration - music inspired by the Bard 1305-1330 *BBCWe Heritage: see 1405 1405-1430 *BBCWe DISCOVERY: see 1505 1405-1430 *BBCWa Heritage: Malcolm Billings explores the world of archaeology and conservation. This week he visits Sri Lanka, a country with a rich cultural heritage spanning 2,500 years 1406-1500 *WPRi THE CONNECTION: More than 90 political groups -- some backed by America -- are jockeying for leadership in Iraq. Even as a new constitution is being drafted, Islamic clerics are calling for a religious state. In search of democracy ... with Dick Gordon, live from Baghdad 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed: Lady Godiva, Robin Hood and a world of myth. Laurie Taylor hears how the stories we tell, tell stories about us. Joined by a trilogy [sic] of tale-tellers, Daniel Donoghue, Stephen Knight and Marina Warner 1505-1530 *BBCWa Discovery: Water is an extraordinary substance. It's the most common and most amazing liquid on the planet. In a series of three programmes Andrew Luck-Baker discovers what makes water such a versatile molecule and how our planet became so watery in the first place 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Case Notes: Graham Easton explores the body's delicate blood clotting system. When properly balanced it keeps our blood flowing through blood vessels but forms a clot within seconds when we cut ourselves. When the balance is upset, we're at risk from serious blood clots or excessive bleeding 1606-1700 *WFPL FRESH AIR: Jonathan Schell: see 2006; also MichR 1612-1700 *WCPN Around Noon: "Bardstock Version 2.0": In celebration of Shakespeare's birthday, Dee presents Around Noon's second annual Bardstock program, in conjunction with the Great Lakes Theater Festival. This year, ideastream and GLTF have solicited high school students from all across Northeast Ohio to write songs inspired by Shakespeare's classic, A Midsummer Night's Dream. Today, you'll hear from the contest winners, as Dee shares their recordings from WCPN's Levenson Performance Studio. Also, Great Lakes artistic director Charlie Fee and CWRU English professor Tom Bishop talk about the current significance of A Midsummer Night`s Dream 1706-1800 *WHYY THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: The ginkgo tree - ancient, resilient, adaptable and the source of the world's most popular herbal supplement Ginkgo Biloba. It's supposed to jack up your brain but how effective is it, really? 1706-1800 *MichR TODD MUNDT: see above 1706-1800 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: An award-winning photojournalist, Louisville native Molly Bingham specializes in covering international conflict. Bingham has spent the past sesquiyear focusing her lens on the hot spots in the Middle East. Most recently she was imprisoned, and finally released from an infamous Iraqi prison. Join the conversation Wednesday as we talk with Molly Bingham from the Middle East 1706-1800 *WBEZ Odyssey: The State of the American City 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Director Robert Altman, recipient of this year's San Francisco Film Society Award for Lifetime Achievement in Directing. Altman's films include "Gosford Park," "Short Cuts," "The Player," "Nashville," "McCabe and Mrs. Miller," and "M*A*S*H." 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Rachel Goodman talks with local activists who use humor to make their points, featuring Comic News publisher Thom Zajac 1707-1819 *K57 JIM BOHANNON: Head of the Sierra Club on Earth Day 1805-1830 *BBCWe HERITAGE: Sri Lanka see 1405 1806-1900 *WBEZ Worldview: Discussing Arab nationalism 1819-1900 *K57 JIM BOHANNON: Head of GreenSpirit, founder of GreenPeace 1900-1945 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: The Emerging Mind. Purple Numbers And Sharp Cheese: Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003. Mixed signals which help to explain language and metaphor. [Rptd Sat, 2115] 1900-2000 *BBCR2 Mike Harding: There is one voice in English music that is immortal, and that belongs to Sandy Denny, singer of songs that have become gems in a catalogue of classic folk music. In a special programme to mark the 25th anniversary of her death, Mike Harding looks back at her short life and remarkable talent, plays the songs she made timeless and hears tributes from friends and fellow musicians. As well as playing an hour's worth of classic Sandy tracks, Mike's also offering an amazing prize for one lucky listener - a 10-CD package covering Sandy's years with the Island label. The 10 CDs include her five albums with Fairport, her classic solo album 'Sandy', her final live concert and a compilation of classic Fairport tracks. Mike will set the competition question during the show 1900-2045 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: Live from the Eden Court Theatre, the Scottish Chamber Orchestra perform a romantic programme with the young Macedonian pianist Simon Trpceski whose recent last minute Scottish engagements have attracted great critical acclaim. Introduced by Sandy Burnett. Mendelssohn: Overture, A Midsummer Night's Dream; Saint-Saens: Piano Concerto No 2;Mendelssohn: Symphony No 5 'Reformation' 1905-1930 *BBCWa HERITAGE: See 1405 1905-1930 *BBCWe DISCOVERY: See 1505 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Frontiers: In 1916 Einstein first put forward his general theory of relativity. Now nearly 90 years later physicists are finally getting ready to put Einstein to the test. Gravity Probe B is a satellite containing some of the most precise measuring devices ever built. It has been more than 40 years in the making, cost over 600 million dollars, and has needed to invent a dozen completely new technologies, including the roundest object on the planet, in order to make it happen 2000-2100 *BBCR2 All Singing, All Dancing, All Night: Stuart Maconie returns with another series on northern soul, playing classic cuts, lost gems and talking to key figures on the Northern Soul scene. Programme 1: Stuart's guest in this opening show is Brian Rae, a leading DJ from the Twisted Wheel, which opened in Manchester 40 years ago, March 1963. A few months later on 23rd September it held its first allnighter, a full 10 years before the first all nighter at Wigan Casino, and The twisted Wheel rapidly became the 'In' place in Manchester's thriving club scene. 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Jonathan Schell talks about US foreign policy, military force, and new ways of preventing war. Schell is a correspondent for "The Nation" magazine and author of "The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence, and the Will of the People." 2030-2100 *WUGA Earth, Air, Fire, and Water is a five-part series featuring nationally known nature writers reading from and talking about their works. The series will air daily, Mon-Fri 2045-2115 *BBCR3 Night Waves: William Gibson's novel Neuromancer gave the world the term cyberspace. Now the patron saint of cyber punk literature eschews the future for the present with his new novel Pattern Recognition. He talks to Philip Dodd in an extended interview 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Charlie Gillett Without Frontiers: For the fifth programme in this current series, Charlie Gillett looks at the theme of 'wind' and its various interpretations in music 2105-2130 *BBCWa DISCOVERY: See 1505 2205-2300 *WQXR DRIVETIME WITH NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC: "The Return of Kurt Masur, Music Director Emeritus" 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Vienna: City Of Music: John Suchet visits Vienna to explore this city which was the cultural capital of Europe for 150 years and is still at the centre of classical musical life today. This second programme of the series focuses on the period in the 19th Century when this city which produced Schubert, the Viennese Waltz and the Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra UT THU APRIL 24 THURSDAYS Niger National Concord Day Armenia Genocide Remembrance Day; St. Fidelis Turks & Caicos (Islands) parliamentary elections Iceland First Day of Summer [how do they figure that?] 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: Versatile string virtuoso Pinchas Zuckerman, this time as a soloist, joins pianist Marc Neikrug in a classical recital of violin and viola music from the National Arts Centre in Ottawa. The program features works by Mozart, Brahms and Mozart 0000-0215 *WHRB NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC: See last week; not as on WHRB page 0005-0030 *BBCWS HERITAGE: See Wed 1405 0005-0100 *CBCR1 IDEAS: Rice. Half the people on the planet eat it once a day. But rice is more than food: it's folklore, culture, and history. Iris Yudai explores the power of rice, East and West [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR TODD MUNDT: Gingko Biloba 0105-0130 *BBCWS DISCOVERY: See Wed 1505 0106-0200 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: An award-winning photojournalist, Louisville native Molly Bingham specializes in covering international conflict. Bingham has spent the past sesquiyear focusing her lens on the hot spots in the Middle East. Most recently she was imprisoned, and finally released from an infamous Iraqi prison. Join the conversation Wednesday as we talk with Molly Bingham from the Middle East 0106-0200 *MichR THE CONNECTION: Iraqi politics; see 0206 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: A CRISIS IN TEACHING? G.K. Chesterton once observed, "Education is simply the soul of a society as it passes from one generation to another." If such is the case, American society has some explaining to do. What is going on in our public schools? Our students consistently rank lower than most others around the "developed world." Despite heavy expenditures, little has been achieved in attempts to alleviate the problem. Is teaching to blame? Two leading education experts, VIVIAN TROEN and KATHERINE BOLES, think they have the answer. Their new book is Who's Teaching Your Children?: Why the Teacher Crisis is Worse than You Think and What Can Be Done About It [NOT! -- instead a show about the Wright Brothers!] 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: More than 90 political groups -- some backed by America -- are jockeying for leadership in Iraq. Even as a new constitution is being drafted, Islamic clerics are calling for a religious state. On The Connection after nine...In search of democracy ... with Dick Gordon, live from Baghdad % 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Jonathan Schell talks about US foreign policy, military force, and new ways of preventing war. Schell is a correspondent for "The Nation" magazine and author of "The Unconquerable World: Power, Nonviolence, and the Will of the People." 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: Yo-Yo Ma demonstrates his own search - on Asia's ancient Silk Road, as well as in Brazil, Argentina, and Africa - for the roots of musical expression 0300-0400 *KBYU CALLAS IN HER OWN WORDS: 2 of 4 1306-1400 *WPRi Tom Clark: Tom Clark talks with Ideas Network program director Joy Cardin about his retirement, and some upcoming program changes 1406-1500 *WPRi The Connection: one month ago, a thunder of bombs signaled the beginning of war in Iraq. A different nation now comes to life beneath the rubble. On his last day in Baghdad, Dick Gordon is talking with everyday Iraqis about liberation and occupation % 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Music Restored: Pepys' Passion For Music: 300 years after the death of Samuel Pepys, Lucie Skeaping delves into his passion for music. Not only are his diaries littered with musical references, but Pepys himself was a keen amateur performer and composer 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): Current uses and abuses of unsolicited mass email -- known as "spam." Guests: Larry Magid, syndicated columnist and radio commentator; Ken Hirshman, vice president and general counsel at Digital Impact, a provider of email marketing solutions; and Enrique Salem, CEO of Brightmail, an anti- spam technology company. Check-ins with: Debra Bowen, state senator (D-Redondo Beach); Jon Oliver, chief spam fighter for Mail Frontier, and other possible guests TBA 1630-1700 *BBCR4 The Material World: If seismology is the study of earthquakes on our planet, what is helioseismology? It is the study of 'sunquakes', the sound waves that propagate through the Sun's interior and appear at its visible surface. Quentin Cooper finds out more about sunquake science. In the same way as terrestrial seismology, astronomers are now able to measure millions of sound waves that propagate throughout the Sun, causing it to vibrate or ring like a bell. This technique is known as helioseismology. [believe it or not, we are trying to cut down on the size of this effort, by not reproducing entire details of all items, such as this one. If really interested, check the appropriate webpages yourself] 1700-1800 *CAINAN THE POINT: The Beatles: Mindy chats with Prof. Glen Gass on the 39th anniversary of the Fab Four's arrival in the US. Rebroadcast. 1706-1800 *KUSP TALK OF THE BAY: Like other wars, the war in Iraq has been aided by the careful use of language to form public opinion. JT Mason welcomes professor of sociology Daniel Schwartz to talk about the role language has played in this war. Also: Can Jews and Palestinians successfully sit down and talk about what to do in the Middle East? That's what Ilese Cohen, Sephardic Jew, and Palestinian- American Hanan Rasheed will do. And Bill Monning reviews the week's Monterey County headlines 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Journalist Gerald Nachman, author of "Seriously Funny: The Rebel Comedians of the 1950s and 1960s." His other books include "Raised on Radio." 1806-1900 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: The Supreme Court takes on a First Amendment case pitting Nike against critics who say the company is lying about its labor practices. At the heart of the debate -- when does corporate speech cross a line and become a commercial? % 1900-1930 *BBCR4 What If...? Enigma/Ultra: What If the Germans had discovered that the Allies had cracked Enigma during The Second World War? They're known, in Churchill's memorable phrase, as 'the geese that laid the golden eggs, and never cackled' - the thousands of codebreakers at Bletchley Park who kept Churchill and Roosevelt one step ahead of Hitler's game. What's surprising is that the German High Command never twigged that its highly confidential Enigma communications were being monitored. Professor Chris Andrew imagines a very different outcome to the Second World War, one in which the Allies failed to break the code. Arguably the first atomic bomb would have been dropped not on Hiroshima, but in Europe, on Berlin 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: For the first time ever, state poets laureate convene to address the old question of the role of the poet in society. In the second hour, we discuss poetry, politics and the public square % 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Mark Lamarr's Shake, Rattle & Roll: Mark makes the obese the object of his attention in a programme aimed at Rock 'n' Roll's Roly Polys. The incomparable Louis Jordan's opinion is: 'You're too fat and that's that' while King Perry, Gene Phillips, Carl Matthews and a dozen other artists aren't entirely sympathetic about Big Fat Mamas like 'Two Ton Annie' and their male counterparts like 'Short Fat Ben' 2030-2100 *WUGA Earth, Air, Fire, and Water is a five-part series featuring nationally known nature writers reading from and talking about their works. The series will air daily, Mon-Fri 2130-2200 *KCRW BOOKWORM: Norman Mailer talks about his latest book The Spooky Art: Thoughts on Writing 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Vienna: City Of Music: John Suchet visits Vienna to explore this city which was the cultural capital of Europe for 150 years and is still at the centre of classical musical life today. This last programme of the series focuses on the Vienna State Opera and its association with Wagner, Mahler and Richard Strauss UT FRI APRIL 25 FRIDAYS Egypt Sinai's Liberation Day Swaziland National Flag's Day; Faroe Islands Flag Day Orthodox Good Friday; Australia, New Zealand Anzac Day Iran celebration of the American humilation in Tabas Korea North People's Army Foundation Day Italy, Portugal Liberation Day; St. Mark the Evangelist 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: From Pollack Hall, CBC McGill presents an all- Prokofiev evening commemorating the 50th anniversary of the composer's death 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: The 2003 Barbara Frum Lecture: Bernard Lewis, Emeritus Professor of Near Eastern Studies at Princeton University, talks about what history teaches us about Islam, the appeal of Osama bin Laden in the Arab world, and how Saddam Hussein's Baath party was inspired by the Nazis [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: Life on Mars. Scientists think it's probable, if microbial. And when we discover it, what then? How will we study it without killing it? Without it killing us? 0106-0200 *MichR The Connection: Talking with everyday Iraqis about liberation and occupation 0106-0200 *WPRi Tom Clark: Tom Clark talks with Ideas Network program director Joy Cardin about his retirement, and some upcoming program changes 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: URBAN RENEWAL: Not long ago, the urban neighborhood seemed a terminally ill species. Millions across America had fled once-thriving cities for a more relaxed suburban atmosphere, leaving behind increasingly impoverished and grim downtowns, with diminishing infrastructure and dwindling hope. Some cities -- perhaps Chicago is one -- have seen great revivals; others, like Detroit, seem hopeless. Regardless, the issues of urban decay -- why the problem became so dismal and what can be done about it -- demand a close look. Our guest tonight, ALEXANDER VON HOFFMAN of Harvard University, has taken his own close look, researching the urban neighborhoods of New York, Boston, Chicago, Atlanta, and Los Angeles. His findings are reported in House by House, Block by Block: The Rebirth of America's Urban Neighborhoods 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: One month ago, a thunder of bombs signaled the beginning of war in Iraq. A different nation now comes to life beneath the rubble. On his last day in Baghdad, Dick Gordon is talking with everyday Iraqis about liberation and occupation % 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: "Hard Time: Life After Prison." This special looks at the impact that America's thirty years of war on crime has had on communities and families. The war shows signs of winding down - arrest numbers have flattened, "three strikes" laws are being scaled back, and the prison building boom is over - but decades of "tough on crime" policies have left the U.S. with 2 million people behind bars and some 600,000 being released from prison each year. This story is a collaboration with the PBS program "Now with Bill Moyers." 1230-1300 *BBCR4 Feedback Iraq War Special: Roger Bolton returns with a special edition of the listeners letters programme, airing comments and views on the BBC coverage of the war in Iraq. 1406-1500 *WPRi Jean Feraca: Journalist John Nichols joins Jean Feraca to talk about international response to the U.S. failure to protect antiquities during the war in Iraq. Guest: John Nichols, Associate Editor of The Capital Times in Madison, Wisconsin; co-author "Our media, Not Theirs"; jnichols@madison.com 1430-1500 *KUNM Peace Talks, A Department of Peace? This time, this monthly program spotlighting peace-making and conflict resolution will explore both federal and state initiatives to establish a new agency known as the Department of Peace. Chris Griscom will talk about the effort in New Mexico. Chris is an internationally acclaimed Spiritual Teacher and Healer, and the founder of The Light Institute and The Nizhoni School For Global Consciousness, both of which are located in Galisteo, New Mexico. The show will include a brief phone interview with Rep. Dennis Kucinich (D-Ohio) who has introduced a bill in the U.S. House of Representatives for a national Department of Peace 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: Michael Rosen with Radio 4s programme about words and the way we speak. 4. Bridal Talk: Love, Honour And Obey: Word Of Mouth explores the language of traditional and civil marriages vows at the time of seasonal spring weddings. And, beware, be aware, be wary: the uses and corruptions of the interesting words ending in ware [Rptd Sun, 1930] 1506-1600 *WSUI Iowa Talks Live from the Java House: Hospice: Adding Life to Days When we enter this world, love, comfort and care surround us. The mission of Iowa City Hospice is to help provide the same when we leave. The Stones in the Field provides patient-centered palliative care in seven eastern Iowa counties to those affected by a terminal illness. Guests this hour will include: Ginger Nowak, one of the organization's founders; Anna Bradshaw, a chaplain at Iowa City Hospice; Cheryl Vahl, the Palliative Care Coordinator at the University of Iowa's Holden Comprehensive Cancer Center; and family members whom they've served. Live music by the Celtic band The Stones in the Field 1800-1830 *BBCR2 Midnight Train To Georgia: The Best Thing That Ever Happened To Me: Des'ree presents the final chapter of the Gladys Knight story, which charts her career from the 80s to present day. Her decision to go solo and her collaborations with artists. Her friends assess her musical legacy and we find out what happened to The Pips. And find out the importance of the song the Best Thing That Ever Happened to Me 1806-1900 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: Military Psychiatry How does war affect the minds of soldiers? In this hour of Science Friday, we'll talk about the mental health of fighting men and women -- from 'shell shock' to post-traumatic stress disorder % 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FIRDAY: The End of the World Have you ever thought about how life on earth--or even the earth itself-- will end? In this hour of Science Friday, we'll talk about possible scenarios for the future of the planet and life upon it % 2030-2100 *WUGA Earth, Air, Fire, and Water is a five-part series featuring nationally known nature writers reading from and talking about their works. The series will air daily, Mon-Fri 2030-2100 *BBCR2 Listen To The Band: Featuring the National Youth Brass Band of New Zealand on their current tour of the UK, conducted by Nigel Weeks 2100-2130 *BBCR2 The Music Never Ends: Programme Four. Pieces Of Dreams: David Jacobs continues the Michel Legrand story. Although best known for his film scores, Legrand is also a conductor of renown and a virtuoso jazz pianist. This programme considers Legrand the artist, and features newly recorded interviews with Barbara Streisand, Tony Bennett, trumpeter Arturo Sandoval and legendary jazz bassist Ron Carter 2106-2200 *WPRi Dave Berkman in for Kathleen Dunn: The United States space program should be privatized to bring it into the 21st century. So says Dave Berkman's guest today after four. Guest: Robert Garmong, writer Ayn Rand Institute 2200-2230 *BBCR4 Great Lives: Poet Benjamin Zephaniah joins Humphrey Carpenter to explore the life of reggae legend Bob Marley. From his musical origins in the squalor and dynamism of the Trench Town district of Kingston, Jamaica to global superstardom, Marley remained passionate about music with a message. Marley biographer Chris Salewicz also helps to explore why, since his death in 1981, Marley's stature in the developing world has grown from rebel leader to redeeming hero 2206-2300 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: The ties between corporate-owned media, corporations in general and politics in America weakens Democracy – so says Dave Berkman's guest today on Media Talk after five. Guest: Herbert Gans, Prof of Sociology COLUMBIA UNIVERSITY "Democracy and the News" 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Phones For Ants, Concerts For Worms: Christopher Bigsby is joined by Randal Keynes, Darwin's great-great-grandson, to hear about the touching relationship between Darwin and his neighbour Sir John Lubbock, and the remarkable experiments they conducted with the smallest of creatures. Could ants hear music - could they even communicate with one another through the telephone? 2230-2400 *BBCR3 Jazz On 3: Der Rote Bereich: Jez Nelson presents the debut UK recording of the German trio Der Rote Bereich. Led by guitarist Frank Möbus, the group was recorded at the Vortex Club, in front of a packed house containing many musicians from across London's Jazz spectrum UT SAT APRIL 26 SATURDAYS Tanzania (United Republic of) Union Day; St. Cletis 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: Enjoy a hot evening of tangos. Bandoneon virtuoso Daniel Binelli leads his trio in works by Piazzolla, Plaza and Binelli himself. Then, it's Quartango in works that will have you gliding rhythmically across the floor in no time! 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part One of Regarding Islam. Since Sept. 11, 2001, the West's focus on Muslim countries has intensified. But so have old prejudices and ignorance both outside the Islamic world and within it. Vancouver writer/broadcaster Don Mowatt talks with leading scholars about aspects of Islam that have been completely ignored in the current debate [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0206-0300 *WPRi Jean Feraca: Journalist John Nichols joins Jean Feraca to talk about international response to the U.S. failure to protect antiquities during the war in Iraq. Guest: John Nichols, Associate Editor of The Capital Times in Madison, Wisconsin; co-author "Our Media, Not Theirs"; jnichols@madison.com 0400-0500 *KUNM Afropop Worldwide, "The Festival In The Desert 2003: Groovin' With The Tuaregs In Timbuktu." We trek to the Timbuktu region in northern Mali to a magical festival where 2,000 Tuaregs have come to hang out together, race their camels, play sand hockey and enjoy concerts by Tuareg musicians from Mali, Mauritania and Niger. We visit artists in their tents for unplugged, acoustic sessions by Haira Arby, Bocar Majo, Lobi Traore and others. Plus highlights from festival concerts, and visits with festival participants, including Robert Plant, who used to fly around the world on a private 747 with Led Zepellin. This time, he bumped across the desert in a 4x4 like the rest of us! 1200-1300 *BBCR3 World Routes: The first of a two-part feature from Guinea-Bissau. A small forgotten and isolated country in West Africa, Guinea- Bissau has only recently emerged from years of political instability and civil war. Until now its music, combining local traditions with a unique creole culture, has rarely been heard outside the country. Lucy Duran visits Guinea-Bissau, and encounters the exuberant musical parties of the Balanta men, who ornament their bodies in white clay and bicycle chains, and cross-dress 1405-1430 *CBCR1 What a Week: From headline to punchline. This week, American "morning zoo radio" comes to Baghdad and Jean Chretien takes you on a tour of his unfulfilled election promises [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1430-1500 *BBCR4 The Indispensables: The Paper Cup: With the rise of the big coffee chains, millions rush to work everyday juggling briefcase with paper cup, yet few stop to think that its origins lie in a life saving public health campaign that gripped America 1730-XXXX *WOSUf National Council Grand Finals Concert [of what? presumably Met Opera auditions] 1900-2000 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: Living With Oil: The triumphs and the tragedies of discovering black gold beneath the North Sea. Oral historian, Hugo Manson, from the University of Aberdeen, guides us through his extensive archive of recorded interviews with people whose lives have in some way been touched by oil 2000-2100 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: Yo-Yo Ma describes the agonies and the heroism of statelessness, and theater director Peter Sellers talks about his international re-staging of "Euripides: Children of Heracles." 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Hall & Oates Live And Exclusive: Hall and Oates perform a mix of their old and new songs in a live and exclusive concert recorded on April 7th at Hackney's Ocean in London 2115-2200 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: The Emerging Mind. Purple Numbers And Sharp Cheese: Professor V S Ramachandran 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Between Stones And Stars: Rebecca Elson was a remarkable poet and an astronomer. She died in 1999 aged 39, leaving behind a collection of inspiring poems which cover subjects as diverse as Dark Matter, her husband's boxer shorts and the cancer which was killing her. This celebration of her work and life is presented by David Constantine, with contributions from friends and colleagues, readings by Theresa Gallagher and Penny Whistle, performed specially by Michael Donaghy UT SUN APRIL 27 SUNDAYS Sierra Leone National Day South Africa Liberty Day; Togo Independence Day Turkmenistan Horse Celebration Yemen elections to the legislature Moldova (Republic of) Memorial Day Serbia & Montenegro National Day Slovenia Celebration of the uprising Argentina parliamentary elections; Paraguay general elections [Deutsche Welle 50th anniversary programs begin, thru May 3 [3-055] 0000-0145 *WNYCf Concerts from the Frick Collection: Recital Series until Sept opens with Pianist Anne Queffelec. The 2003 series of Concerts from the Frick Collection, hosted by Margaret Juntwait, begins with a recital by French pianist Anne Queffelec. The program features works by Scarlatti, Schubert, Ravel, and Liszt 0330-0400 WRMI VIVA MIAMI: SWL Winterfest special 2 of 2 7385 [3-065] 1130-1200 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Food And Eyesight: It's possible that the eyes are the seat of the soul, but they're certainly also an outward sign of inner health. Britain like most developed countries has experienced an increase in the numbers of people suffering from short-sightedness, and from much more serious eye diseases. New research shows it may have to do with what we eat now [Rptd Mon 1500] 1300-1400 *BBCR3 BBC Legends: Artur Rubinstein: Piers Lane presents the second of his two programmes of performances from the BBC Archive by the legendary Polish pianist Artur Rubinstein, including studies and a polonaise by Chopin, Schubert's Impromptu in G flat and Tchaikovsky's First Piano Concerto with the Philharmonia Orchestra, conducted by Carlo Maria Giulini 1300-1400 *WUOT ST. PAUL SUNDAY: Kronos Quartet 1500-XXXX *YPR The semi-annual classical music quiz with Uri Barnea, Don McComas and Marvin Granger. 1600-1645 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Ivan Hewett explores Béla Bartók's Miraculous Mandarin (Op. 19). Bartok began work on this 'grotesque pantomime' a sordid tale of violence, lust and prostitution, in 1918. It was first performed in 1926 and was the composer's final work for the stage. The specially recorded examples are performed by the BBC National Orchestra of Wales conducted by Peter Stark 1600-1700 *KGOU David Freudberg's ~ Beyond War (pt. 2): This episode explores pacifism, a philosophy that emphasizes non-violent options for managing and resolving conflict. David Freudberg and guests consider such questions as, When has pacifism been effective? When has it failed? What preventive strategies increase the chance that nonviolence can succeed? Is nonviolence a realistic response to terrorism committed on a massive scale? Past and present conscientious objectors to war, from Quaker and other backgrounds, explain their commitment to peaceful action. They share their moral and spiritual beliefs, and recount the reactions of loved ones and friends to their opposition to war 1645-1730 *BBCR3 Sunday Feature: The Art Of Film: Professor Christopher Frayling, Rector of the Royal College Of Art, uncovers the secret relationship between films and paintings. He looks at the ways art has affected movies, and not just so-called 'art films' but westerns, horror movies and Hollywood weepies; how you can see paintings in the strangest places. Directors Bernardo Bertolucci and Ken Russell discuss the art that has influenced their films, and artists Steve McQueen, Gillian Wearing and Isaac Julien discuss the films that have influenced their art 1700-1800 *KGOU National Press Club - Sean Okeefe (NASA): Sean Okeefe, Administrator of NASA, will discuss "NASA's Strategic Plan." (Recorded April 17th) % 1700-1800 *KUNM "The Fourth Psalm." Written by John L. Martins, III, one of four winners in KUNM's Radio Play Contest for 2002, this drama addresses a priest's aid to Latin refugees during the Sanctuary Movement of the Reagan years, and the crisis of conscience which eventually consumes his mentor. The cast includes Ann Beyke, Vivian Connolly, Joe Damour, Carlo Garcia, Bruce Holbrook, Rachel Kaub, Thane Kenny, Richard B. McClarkin, Mercedes Mejia, Carilyn Rome, Scott Sharot, Vic Silva, Robert Stark and Perla Trevizo. Sound effects by Don DeNoon, Cheryl Hooks and Melanie Sanchez. Directed by Frank Melcori, recorded at the South Broadway Cultural Center by Nola Daves Moses, with the assistance of Brandon Kennedy, Daniel Monroe and Antonio Aragon. Produced by Rachel Kaub for Albuquerque Radio Theatre. The theme was written by Frank Melcori and performed by Joe Martinez. Co-sponsored by the Urban Enhancement Trust Fund of the City of Albuquerque and KUNM 1705-1800 *CBCR2 The Singer and The Song: Host Catherine Belyea features comic songs and comic singing – from Stanley Holloway to Flanders & Swann to Anna Russell and our very own Primadonna! You'll hear musical hall turns, some light opera and even some unintentional humour 1730-1900 *WPRm LIVE FROM ELVEHJEM: Pro Arte Quartet and guests: Mozart: Oboe Quartet in F, K370; Prokofiev: Cello Sonata in C, op 119; Brahms: Piano Quartet #3 in c, op 60 1805-2000 *CBCR2 OnStage: a 350th anniversary celebration of Arcangelo Corelli and Johann Pachelbel. Performers include Olivier Brault, Chloe Meyers, Hélène Plouffe and Christina Zacharias, violins; Margaret Little and Stephanie Bozzini, violas; Isabelle Bozzini and Amanda Keesmaat, `cellos, Sylvain Bergeron, theorbo & guitar; Olivier Fortin, harpsichord; and Luc Beauséjour, organ. The music of Corelli and Pachelbel is celebrated with a selection of instrumental works for keyboard and small ensemble, including Pachelbel's beloved Canon 1900-1930 *BBCR4 Feedback Iraq War Special: Roger Bolton returns with a special edition of the listeners letters programme, airing comments and views on the BBC coverage of the war in Iraq 1901-2000 *BBCWa In Concert: Martin Handley introduces more masterworks from the BBC's own music archive. This week's programme celebrates the music of the Russian composer Sergei Prokofiev, who died 50 years ago [new time: no more at 1500 or 1600 Sun] 1905-1930 *BBCWe SOLUTIONS: Clean water 2200-2300 *WGBH The Whole Wide World, Part 7: Christopher Lydon hosts a LIVE national call-in and Internet conversation. 2200-2300 *CAINAN Whole Wide World with Christopher Lydon - live show 2200-2300 *WBEZ The Whole Wide World, part 7 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Something Understood: Aphorisms Of Love: Mark Tully and Lance Dane explore the relationship between the sensual and the sacred. 2300-2400 *WBEZ SUNDAY NIGHT SPECIAL: SPEAKING OF FAITH: Religion in time of war 2300-2400 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: Backroads 2305-2330 *BBCWe SOLUTIONS: Clean water 2315-2345 *BBCR4 The Musical Side Of The Family: Jamie Bernstein, daughter of Leonard Bernstein, talks candidly about her father, a musical genius with a dark side UT MON APRIL 28 MONDAYS Easter Monday Orthodox; St. Peter Chanel Afghanistan Loss of the Muslim Nation Barbados National Heroes Day Monday; Switzerland Sechselaüten Alabama, Missouri Confederate Memorial Day New Hampshire Fast Day; Pitcairn Bounty Day 0000-0100 *WUGA COVER TO COVER: Host St. John Flynn interviews LaGrange College professor John M. Williams, author of the coming-of-age novel Lake Moon (Preempts Selected Shorts) 0000-0100 *WBEZ Johnny Griffin Special (Chicago Public Radio): In conjunction with our April Jazz Feature, we're airing this hour-long special featuring a career retrospective and biography of Griffin folded into a rebroadcast — the first since its original airdate of Griffin's 1988 performance at the Chicago Jazz Festival. The set features Griffin with his quartet — drummer Kenny Washington, bassist Dennis Irwin, and pianist Michael Weiss — and includes compositions written by Ellington/Strayhorn, Thelonious Monk, and Griffin 0000-0100 *CAINAN The Changing World: What Remains to be Discovered II 0005-0200 *CBCR1 OnStage: a 350th anniversary celebration of Arcangelo Corelli and Johann Pachelbel. Performers include Olivier Brault, Chloe Meyers, Hélène Plouffe and Christina Zacharias, violins; Margaret Little and Stephanie Bozzini, violas; Isabelle Bozzini and Amanda Keesmaat, `cellos, Sylvain Bergeron, theorbo & guitar; Olivier Fortin, harpsichord; and Luc Beauséjour, organ. The music of Corelli and Pachelbel is celebrated with a selection of instrumental works for keyboard and small ensemble, including Pachelbel's beloved Canon [+1/2/3 hours] 0100-0200 *CAINAN Beyond War II 0200-0300 *CAINAN How Long's Trane Been Gone, John Coltrane V 0200-0300 *WOIa Speaking of Faith: Children of Abraham: Conflict in the Middle East is often discussed as a political and diplomatic concern. Media and policymakers alike often try to bracket out the volatile religious dimensions of the conflict in Israel in particular. But what new light might be shed on the conflict by an informed understanding of the three monotheistic faiths, each of which relies on scripture's common reverence for this place? Including a revealing interview with guest Bruce Feiler, author of "Abraham and Walking the Bible," and compelling Israeli and Palestinian voices 0300-0400 *KUSC THORNTON CENTER STAGE: New Music for Orchestra -- a concert of new orchestral pieces by Thornton student composers 0400-0500 *WYSO Speaking of Faith: The Soul in Depression: Depression has reached epidemic proportions in American culture, and it is usually discussed and treated as a physiological and psychological malady. Yet the question "Where is God?" may be as start amidst the experience of depression as any other crisis in a human life. Host Krista Tippett and her guests consider depression as the "dark night of the soul," as they explore the religious aspects of the problem through Buddhist, Christian and other traditions and writings. Guests include Quaker educator Parker Palmer and others who have wrestled with depression, both physiologically and spiritually 0500-0600 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Moira talks to Andro Linklater, the author of "Measuring America." From the first colonies to the great march across the plains, they'll discuss challenging technical proposition of surveying America. Moira will also speak with Dr. Joao Magueijo. A professor of theoretical physics at Imperial College in London, he has created a new Scientific Speculation: that the speed of light is not constant. We'll find out what this does to the Laws of Physics 1306-1400 *WPRi Tom Clark: They're supposed to protect Americans from terrorism, but the USA PATRIOT ACT and its sequel have many people worried. Tom Clark's guest explains why both liberals and conservatives are teaming up against these acts. Guest: David Keene, chair of the American Conservative Union http://www.conservative.org 1500-1530 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Food And Eyesight: It's possible that the eyes are the seat of the soul, but they're certainly also an outward sign of inner health. Britain like most developed countries has experienced an increase in the numbers of people suffering from short-sightedness, and from much more serious eye diseases. New research shows it may have to do with what we eat now 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: The Crooked Mile: Neglected for nearly half a century, The Crooked Mile was once described as a British West Side Story in its ambition and musical richness. Edward Seckerson unearths this '50s masterpiece in the company of its composer Peter Greenwell 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): Forum examines the reconstruction profess in post-Taliban Afghanistan. Guests: William Cole, director of the Governance, Law, and Civil Society programs for the Asia Foundation; Carlotta Gall, New York Times journalist; Torek Faradi, senior adviser for Afghanistan and South Asia for the Financial Services Volunteer Corps; Dr. Kahlil Amani, Afghan Psychological Association of America; and Ambassador William Taylor, special representative for donor assistance to Afghanistan for the US Department of State 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: "The Responsibility of the Press in Times of Crisis," the first of this year's Panetta Lecture Series. Recorded last week in Monterey, this discussion features Mark Shields, moderator of CNN's The Capital Gang, and Al Hunt, Washington editor of The Wall Street Journal. They join Leon Panetta for a lively look at how the media have covered Iraq and events of the past several years 1900-1930 *BBCR4 In The Footsteps Of Moses: Edward Stourton explores the 4000-year history of the Jewish people and traces the contemporary relevance of Moses' meeting with God on Mount Sinai 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: North Korean Refugees: It's the invisible exodus. Tens of thousands of people have risked everything to flee North Korea, some making it all the way to the south. Chris Guinness investigates what happens when they get there. And he talks to some of the dedicated activists who have established channels of escape 2030-2115 *BBCR3 Night Waves: An Italian anarchist collective are about to launch the English version of their Europe-wide hit novel, Q, about the Anabaptists, the 16th century radical sect that led a peasant revolt which set the newly Protestant Germany on fire. So who were the Anabaptists - the downtrodden rising up, or a fundamentalist cult? And what does their brand of radical separatist communitarianism they have to teach today's anti-capitalist campaigners? Paul Allen finds out 2305-2330 *CBCR1 Home: Host Jane Farrow looks at our relationship with the vacuum cleaner. This piece of household technology is cherished, despised, collected in museums, deployed in practical jokes and even used as a musical instrument. Jane probes the timeless question: why are so many people passionate about their vacuum cleaners? [+1/2/3/4 hours] 2330-2400 *CBCR1 That's Capital: Nick Purdon breaks up with his furniture and returns it to the store. And then he learns a lesson about how retail stores build relationships with customers. And does being single in the city really add up to big savings? Iris Yudai does the math. All that and a very funny history of tax time with host Al Rae. [+1/2/3/4 hours] UT TUE APRIL 29 TUESDAYS Bangladesh Buddha Purnima Hinduism Japan Day of Nature; Spain (Andalusia) Seville Festival St. Catherine of Siena 0000-0100 *KGOU America Abroad (pt 2) ~ The United States and Europe: Past and Present: In the second program of its six-program series, America Abroad will examine the past, present and future of Transatlantic relations. The program will analyze the long history of America's relationship with Europe; examine the 1956 Suez crisis, a Middle East war that appeared to threaten the foundations of US-European relations; and solicit current expert opinions and citizen attitudes in the United States and Europe towards the troubled Transatlantic relationship. Guests include Garrick Utley, Marvin Kalb, Steve Roberts and Margaret Warner 0000-0100 *WCPN Beyond War: Waging Peace: In this second episode of PRI's Beyond War series, we heard about "non-violent conflict" which has been successful -- from Yugoslavia to S. Africa -- in overthrowing unjust governments without using physical force. Also, antiwar activists, including Nobel Peace Prize winners Bernard Lown and Desmond Tutu as well as the brother of a 9/11 victim, describe the basis for their commitment to non-military solutions 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part Two of When the Machine Awakes. Twenty years ago, Montreal writer George Tombs crossed Europe on foot, walking from Dublin to Jerusalem, in a spiritual quest. In this series, co- produced with Ideas' sister program on Radio-Canada, Des idées plein la tête, George revisits the pilgrim's way. He meets spiritual people and leading scientists, to find out whether science is a threat to spiritual values, or an ongoing challenge and source of enrichment [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 *MichR The Connection: Iran and the post war Persian Gulf puzzle 0106-0200 *WPRi Tom Clark: They're supposed to protect Americans from terrorism, but the USA PATRIOT ACT and its sequel have many people worried. After eight, Tom Clark's guest explains why both liberals and conservatives are teaming up against these acts. Guest: David Keene, chair of the American Conservative Union http://www.conservative.org 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE DAY THE WORLD BLEW UP: Most Americans are well- familiar with the 1980 eruption of Mount St. Helen's in Washington state. Fewer have even heard of the greatest volcano eruption in modern history: that of Krakatoa (in modern-day Indonesia) in 1883. SIMON WINCHESTER, a profilic British author and historian, tells the story in a new book Krakatoa: The Day the World Exploded: August 27, 1883. He joins us, along with some local experts who will explain the causal processes behind the great eruptions 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: As Iran sends agents to Iraq to strengthen the Shites' call for an Islamic republic, some US officials consider playing hardball with Iran. After nine, The Connection examines the new balance of power in the Persian Gulf 0300-0400 *KQED World Affairs Council: "The Future of Freedom: Illiberal Democracy at Home and Abroad." Tonight's speaker is Fareed Zakaria, editor of Newsweek International, Newsweek columnist, and analysts for ABC News. Can we spread democracy to countries like Iraq? Should we? Zakaria provides the historical and philosophical context for what is becoming America's great debate and offers this provocative conclusion: the spread of democracy does not always produce a corresponding growth of liberty 1230-1300 *BBCR4 Taking Note: A new series in which conductors, performers and experts explore familiar pieces of classical music through their own personal experiences. Programme 1: Conductors Sir Roger Norrington and Leonard Slatkin and biographer John Suchet talk about Beethoven's 5th Symphony 1405-1430 *BBCWa Masterpiece: Everyday Design Ed Butler hears from designers to find out how they create everyday objects that are both effective and alluring. This week he focuses on cars 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: More than 40 years ago, Jane Goodall arrived on the shores of East Africa to study chimpanzees. Her innovative methods changed the field of primatology. Now, as apes face new threats, her work may matter more than ever 1606-1700 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI: Tech Tuesday: Wi-Fi: Leave behind the wires and cords. Head out to the park with your laptop and stay connected. Tech Tuesday discusses everything you always wanted to know about Wi-Fi but were afraid to ask. Sami Lais, Contributing Writer, Computerworld Magazine; Jeff Duntemann, author, Jeff Duntemann's Drive-By Wi-Fi; Eric Savitz, West Coast Editor, Barron's 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Host Deanna Zachary talks to author Mark Zepezauer about his new book "Boomerang: How Our Covert Wars Have Created Enemies Across the Middle East and Bring Terror to America" And we invite you to call in with your questions and comments 1800-2100 *BBCR2 various music series; see also DAY 1800-1900 *BBCR2 Evelyn Glennie's Classics: Percussionist Evelyn Glennie presents an eight-part series showcasing light, popular classics. This edition features works by Bach, Mendelsson, Mozart, William Orbit and others 1805-1830 *BBCWe Everyday Design: Ed Butler hears from designers to find out how they create everyday objects that are both and alluring. Subjects covered include cars, sports equipment and packaging 1830-2045 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: BBC Symphony Orchestra: Live from the Barbican, music by two great Hungarian composers, conducted by the Hungarian conductor Zoltan Pesko. Gyorgy Kurtag, born in 1926, was shut off from democracy and the 20th century's musical developments for a large part of his life. Yet he has become a figure of unrivalled integrity through his unswaying quest for a true, individual means of expression and his complete dissociation for political pressures. Bartok too was an individualist: his studies of the folk music of his country greatly influenced his music - as demonstrated in the Dance Suite and the ferocious rhythmic intensity of the ballet The Miraculous Mandarin Bartok: Dance Suite; Kurtag: Messages (Op. 34); Kurtag: Splinters (Op. 6); Kurtag: New Messages (BBC Cc-commission, London Premiere); including interval feature around 1930-1950: Letter From Budapest: Since the collapse of communism in 1989, Hungary has moved from being thought of as an Eastern European country to one in the heart of the continent. With membership of NATO secure, the EU lying ahead and a very strong Germany nearby, how does the country retain its cultural distinctiveness? Last year the Nobel Prize for Literature was won by Imre Kertesz, a Hungarian writer almost totally unknown in Britain - what can Hungary do about that? The Anglo-Hungarian poet George Szirtes investigates. Performance concludes with Bartok's The Miraculous Mandarin - pantomime (Sz. 73) 1900-1940 *BBCR4 Fallout At Maralinga: For half a century, the aboriginal people of Maralinga have waited to get to get their land back. This year they do. Professor John Keane explores how the British commandeered their land from 1957 to 1963 to conduct atomic tests, and how far aboriginal people, servicemen and the environment were put at risk in the name of the Cold War [Rptd Sun 1600] 1905-1930 *BBCWa Masterpiece: Everyday Design: Ed Butler hears from designers to find out how they create everyday objects that are both effective and alluring. This week he focuses on cars 1930-2030 *BBCR2 Bing: The Greatest Of Them All? Pat Boone continues the story of Bing as he moves seamlessly from greatest song stylist to the world`s most popular entertainer. We eavesdrop on a moment in a 1930s recording date when an unusually recalcitrant Crosby quarrels with producer Jack Kapp, and in Hollywood when he provokes Carole Lombard to uncontrollable fury. From a variety of incidents and anecdotes, we learn something of the complex Crosby personality - from the apparently easy-going guy who loved to slip off early from the sound stage onto the golf course or the race track, to the hard working professional for whom getting it right was all-important. We hear a few of the treasured moments from records and radio, both rehearsed and unintended: his marvellous empathy with Connie Boswell and Bob Hope, for example. And we hear much of the music through which the 20th Century worked and played, from Please, I Wished On The Moon and Sweet Leilani, to the infamous White Christmas 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Case Notes: Graham Easton explores prostate cancer, one of the commonest cancers in men, and one of the most hotly debated subjects among doctors and patients. In the UK, the PSA blood test is not offered as a routine screening test because it's not very reliable, and not everyone's happy about that. Case Notes explores how men are managing to steer their way through the prostate cancer maze; from whether to have the PSA test, to deciding which treatment is best for you, including one of the newer techniques called brachytherapy [Rptd Wed 1530] 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Diane Ravitch, author of "The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Children Learn." She says that textbooks have been censored by groups on the left and the right which created an intricate set of rules designed to screen out language that might be considered offensive or controversial 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Unreliable Evidence: English And Islamic Law: Clive Anderson and his guests examine the areas of conflict between domestic English law and Islamic law. Can these two systems co-exist? What happens when they conflict? Should one take precedence over the other, or is this a matter of conscience and civil liberty? 2030-2100 *BBCR2 Diggin' Diz: Guy Barker presents a six-part profile of the great trumpeter Dizzy Gillespie. Featuring contributions from John Dankworth, Digby Fairweather and archive of the man himself 2100-2130 *CBCR1 The World At Six: CBC Radio News begins a special series on the West Nile virus. Today, Pauline Dakin looks at the approach of the mosquito season in Canada. What are the risks, what are the projections, what do we need to be afraid of? [+1/2/3/4 hours] 2130-2200 *BBCWa Music Review Mark Lowther talks to German singer/actress/cabaret artist Ute Lemper and pays tribute to one of the 'grand old men' of American music, Lou Harrison, who died recently UT WED APRIL 30 WEDNESDAYS Viet Nam Victory Day Netherlands Queen's Birthday; St. Maximus Sweden St Walpurgis; Congo (Dem. Rep. of the) Education Day 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: From Avery Fisher Hall, Lincoln Center, pianist Konstantin Lifschitz joins the New York Philharmonic Orchestra in works by Bernstein, Prokofiev and more 0005-0030 *BBCWS Everyday Design: Ed Butler hears from designers to find out how they create everyday objects that are both and alluring. Subjects covered include cars, sports equipment and packaging 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Blue Metropolis Bleu. Paul Kennedy reports from an international and multilingual literary festival in Montreal, where authors from around the world discuss culture, politics, nationalism and language [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: More than 40 years ago, Jane Goodall arrived on the shores of East Africa to study chimpanzees. Her innovative methods changed the field of primatology. Now, as apes face new threats, her work may matter more than ever 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Diane Ravitch, author of "The Language Police: How Pressure Groups Restrict What Children Learn." She says that textbooks have been censored by groups on the left and the right which created an intricate set of rules designed to screen out language that might be considered offensive or controversial 0430-0500 *KUOW RADIO INTERSECTION: Beyond War Part 4 - Waging Peace - The second installment of Humankind's Beyond War series, hear about people who refuse military service on grounds of conscience; a college-age peace activist; a Ohio historian who has studied the long tradition of pacifism in America, and a foreign policy expert who chronicles cases in which tyrants have been overthrown through "nonviolent conflict." 1130-1200 *RN DOCUMENTARY: Mother of radio. The struggle to liberate the airwaves in South Africa. Bush Radio calls itself the mother of community radio in South Africa. Rightfully so. In the final years of apartheid, the people at Bush Radio in Capetown prepared for the moment the airwaves would be freed from state control. They trained broadcasters and they distributed their programmes on audio cassettes throughout the country. They planned their first illegal broadcast on May day, in 1993. Ten years later, Bush Radio sees its struggle in the sprawling townships around Capetown as the fight against poverty, HIV – AIDS +5965 [see DAY for repeat times and links] 1305-1330 *BBCWe Water Walks: A series following people who bring water home to their families, making the life preserving trip to the nearest water source. Often the daily quest for water means there is time for little else 1306-1400 *WPRi Tom Clark: Despite political scandals and the current budget crisis, most residents still think Wisconsin is a great place to live. Join Tom Clark for his final hour, when he and his guest ask you what's so great about our state. Guest: Donald Ferree (ferry), Associate Director of Public Opinion Research at the University of Wisconsin Survey Center 1405-1430 *BBCWe Discovery: In a series of four programmes Andrew Luck-Baker discovers what makes water such a versatile molecule and how our planet became so watery in the first place 1405-1430 *BBCWa WATER WALKS: See 1305 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed: Laurie Taylor and Stan Cohen relive thirty years of 'moral panics' as they discuss mods and rockers, single mothers and disproportionate responses to perceived threats 1505-1530 *BBCWa DISCOVERY: See 1405 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: Claimed as a hero by the right and the left, George Orwell is still inspiring a mighty battle over his heritage. Though many writers born a hundred years ago have been forgotten... people still ask: What would Orwell do? The Connection attempts to answer that question 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Case Notes: Graham Easton explores prostate cancer, one of the commonest cancers in men, and one of the most hotly debated subjects among doctors and patients 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): Colin Robertson, the Canadian Consul General to Los Angeles. They'll discuss US-Canada relations, Canadian participation in post-war efforts in Iraq and SARS 1700-1800 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Thomas Menino, Mayor of Boston and President, U.S. Conference of Mayors. Topic: "America's Cities: Stories from the Homefront" 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Rachel Goodman talks about the upcoming May Day Labor Film Festival, with organizer Gary Fritz and filmaker Tia Lessin 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Bill McKibben, author of "Enough: Staying Human in an Engineered Age." His other books include "The End of Nature," and he is a scholar in residence at Middlebury College 1745-1830 *BBCR3 lebrecht.live: Why Are We Scared Of New Music? We rush out to see the latest films, snap up new novels, swarm to contemporary art. But mention new music and most people stay away. Why the fear? It cannot only be the legacy of atonality. Much new music nowadays is tuneful. Yet audiences remain unconvinced. Is there something deeper within us that reinforces the fear, condemning music to live in its past? 1805-1830 *BBCWe WATER WALKS: See 1305 1900-1945 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: Neuroscience, The New Philosophy: Transforming our understanding of mankind and our place in the cosmos, Professor V S Ramachandran delivers the Reith Lectures 2003 [Rptd Sat, 2115] 1905-1930 *BBCWe DISCOVERY: See 1405 1905-1930 *BBCWa WATER WALKS: See 1305 1930-1950 *BBCR3 Twenty Minutes: Mr Marconi's Sparks: This evening's concert by the Bournemouth Symphony Orchestra is broadcast from Poole. Both towns share a distinguished but little-known place in the history of such broadcasts. Sean Street tells the story of the first paid radiogram and the first piece of radio journalism, transmitted in Bournemouth by Guglielmo Marconi in 1898. He then moved to Poole, amazing the populace with showers of sparks from his equipment, but he stayed for almost 30 years, working on the wireless [interval feature; time approx.] 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Frontiers: The robin in the garden and the roast chicken on the dinner table are just the latest stages in the evolution of dinosaurs, say fossil experts. Peter Evans examines their latest evidence in the form of spectacular feathered dinosaur fossils from China that are fuelling a debate on the origins of feathered flight 2005-2030 *BBCWa DISCOVERY: See 1405 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Charlie Gillett Without Frontiers: Showcasing an eclectic selection of music on a particular theme. Today, songs about desert blues, with music from Calexico, Blind Willie McTell and Squeeze 2230-2300 *CBCR1 Dispatches: The Last of the Red Hot Hungarian Bandits: how changing times put the beloved bad boy of Budapest out of business and behind bars [+1/2/3/4 hours] UT THU MAY 1 THURSDAYS 0000-0100 *WCPN The Arts as an Economic Engine for Northeast Ohio: "Building Alliances to Strengthen the Arts" This second program in a four part series examining the impact of the arts on the region features guest panelists David Abbott, Glen Shumate, James Levin, and Prester Picket. The panel will discuss how Northeast Ohio is fortifying its arts assets, and opportunities for collaborative partnerships that will allow a diverse arts community to thrive. This program is being presented as an evening Around Noon special, and will include an introduction by ideastream's Dee Perry 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: The Vancouver Recital Society presents violinist Elizabeth Batiashvili with pianist Benjamin Hochman in a recital from the Vancouver Playhouse. The program includes works by Mozart, Schubert, Gershwin and Prokofiev 0005-0030 *BBCWS WATER WALKS: See Wed 1305 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: The World is Too Much. Poet, novelist, essayist, scientist and educator Alan Lightman delivers the annual Hart House Lecture at the University of Toronto, titled The World is Too Much With Me: Finding Private Space in a Wired World [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0100-0200 *WFUV Special: "American Mavericks" - "Populism vs. Modernism"; hosted by Suzanne Vega [in what field(s)?] 0105-0130 *BBCWS DISCOVERY: See Wed 1405 0106-0200 *WPRi Tom Clark: Despite political scandals and the current budget crisis, most residents still think Wisconsin is a great place to live. Join Tom Clark for his final hour, when he and his guest ask you what's so great about our state. Guest: Donald Ferree (ferry), Associate Director of Public Opinion Research at the University of Wisconsin Survey Center 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: This week, we'll weigh the burdens of killer viruses, global warming, and environmental exhaustion on the human habitat 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Claimed as a hero by the right and the left, George Orwell is still inspiring a mighty battle over his heritage. Though many writers born a hundred years ago have been forgotten...people still ask: What would Orwell do? The Connection attempts to answer that question 1100-XXXX *WHRB ORGY MONTH BEGINS! THE VILLAGE VANGUARD ORGY: The unassuming basement at 178 Seventh Avenue South, in the heart of Greenwich Village in New York City, makes for an unlikely mecca. Yet to jazz fans, it has been just that for nearly seven decades. Jazz clubs come and go, but the Village Vanguard has been a mainstay since 1935, surviving the demise of the legendary 52nd Street scene only a few miles uptown. There are few modern jazz greats who have not recorded at the Vanguard, and even fewer who have never headlined there. This orgy will be a presentation of all the recorded Village Vanguard performances in chronological order, starting with Sonny Rollins's timeless trio sessions in 1957 [continues until Monday 1700! except pauses for a few regular weekend programs; and resumes Tuesday 0000] 1306-1400 *WPRi Joy Cardin: Earlier this week, the state of Virginia enacted the nation's toughest anti-spam law. But, Joy Cardin's guest after eight says, as good as it is, the legislation doesn't go far enough ....and only a federal law will be effective at stopping junk e-mail. Guest: Shane Ham, senior policy analyst for the Progressive Policy Institute www.ppionline.org [no repeat at 0106, q.v.] 1400-1428 *BBCR4 Questions, Questions: Stewart Henderson answers those niggling questions from everyday life. 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Music Restored: The Brandenburg Concertos: The series of six concertos which Bach donated as a gift to the Margrave of Brandenburg in 1721 now take their name from their dedicatee. Lucie Skeaping looks closely at the structure and orchestration of the six works, all composed for different ensembles and all of varying length and style. How did Bach formulate the works, and what was the reason for presenting them to the Margrave - a man he had only met on one occasion previously? 1530-1600 *BBCR4 The Material World: May Day is a time associated with flowers, maypoles and folklore - but is there any science in folklore? It turns out that researchers world wide are getting into the science behind these rural traditions, so what better time for us to explore it than the first of May? Quentin Cooper looks at some of the science behind the folklore in fields such as archaeoastronomy, the study of the astronomical practices, celestial lore, mythologies, religions and world views of ancient cultures 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): Forum discusses journalistic objectivity in the wake of the war in Iraq. Guests: Deni Elliott, director of the Practical Ethics Center at the University of Montana and professor of philosophy and adjunct professor at the School of Journalism; Tom Rosenstiel, director of the Project for Excellence in Journalism; and Henry Norr, former technology reporter for the San Francisco Chronicle 1700-1800 *CAINAN THE POINT: Vern Laux, The bird-man of Martha's Vineyard 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Forum learns much more about history with Kenneth C. Davis, author of "Don't Know Much About History." Davis is the author of the "Don't Know Much About" series 1830-1955 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: In The Works: Allan Hall examines Manuel de Falla's ballet The Three-Cornered Hat, which was hailed as a defining moment in modern Spanish culture at its London premiere in 1919, but greeted with suspicion by Spanish critics for its cliched image of Spain. With contributions from Falla's great-niece, Elena de Paredes, Yvan Nommick of the Falla Archive in Granada, and Falla biographer Carol Hess, and a complete recording from 1961 by Ernest Ansermet, who conducted that first performance in 1919 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: the creator of Ragtime, Billy Bathgate, and World's Fair, novelist E.L. Doctorow. His new book is part memoir, part literary criticism and part rumination % 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Analysis: With Friends Like These: European hopes for a common foreign and security policy have suffered their worst blow ever as a result of the Anglo-American war against Iraq and Franco-German opposition to it. Is it time for Europe's pro- and anti-Atlanticists to go their separate ways? Bruce Clark weighs the costs of a split and asks if a reconciliation based on long-term common interests is still achievable [Rptd Sun, 2030] 1955-2030 *BBCR3 Crumb: Makrokosmos, Volume I (Twelve Fantasy-Pieces after the Zodiac for amplified piano): Played by Boris Berezovsky in Cheltenham Town Hall as part of the Cheltenham Festival 2001 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Costing The Earth: What Lies Beneath: We're no better at predicting earthquakes and volcanic eruptions than the Ancient Greeks. Tom Feilden meets the scientists who plan to change that 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Guest discusses the daily lives of Palestinians living in occupied territory. Guest: Raja Shehadeh, a Palestinian lawyer and writer who lives in Ramallah. He is the founder of the human rights organization Al-Haq, and author of "Strangers in the House: Coming of Age in Occupied Palestine" (Penguin) 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: follows up her three o'clock hour with an Israeli's view of the current Middle East peace effort. After four, Kathleen talks with a spokesman from the Embassy of Israel in Washington, DC. Guest: Mark Regev, Washington, DC-based Embassy of Israel spokesman 2200-2300 *BBCR3 Late Junction: Verity Sharp listens to Israeli singer Yasmin Levy's reinvention of the ancient Sephardic Ladino musical tradition and a live recording of Keith Jarrett Gary Peacock and Jack DeJohnette 2206-2300 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: The Shiite majority in Iraq and neighboring Iran are calling for the establishment of an Islamic state in post-war Iraq. After five Kathleen Dunn and her guest discuss whether theocracy or democracy will win out as the government of choice in the newly "liberated" country. Guest: Mustapha Tlili, senior Fellow on Islamic World Relations with the West at the World Policy Institute former chief of Anti-Apartheid, Decolonization and Palestine programs, former principal Officer/Director in charge of communications policies in the Department of Public Information of the U.N. Secretariat, former director of the U.N. Information Center for France 2330-XXXX *WABE Between the Lines: The Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche: Turning the Mind into an Ally 2330-0145 *WQXR New York Philharmonic Live! - Kurt Masur conducts performances of Lukas Foss` "Passacaglia, Bachanalia, Passacaglia"; Handel`s "Ode to St. Cecilia`s Day", and Bach`s Orchestral Suite No. 3 UT FRI MAY 2 FRIDAYS 0000-0215 *WRR NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE! See Thu 2330; and DAY for more stations 0000-2400 *WHRB VILLAGE VANGUARD ORGY continues; see Thu 1100 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: The Ideas of Alan Lightman. He teaches astrophysics and creative writing at MIT. Alan Lightman displays his capacity to discuss both the Theory of Relativity and the future of fiction in this conversation with Paul Kennedy [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: Picture a snowball with a circumference of 25 thousand miles. According to one theory, that was Earth 700 million years ago. But instead of ending life as we know it... this super ice age created it [show usually has several topics] 0100-XXXX *WABE ChevronTexaco Metropolitan Opera: National Grand Finals Concert - The last performance of the ChevronTexaco Metropolitan Opera's 2003 season 0100-0200 *WPRi NPR Coverage of President Bush's Address: Acting President Bush is expected to declare an end to "major combat operations" in Iraq in a speech to the nation tonight. Stay tuned at eight to hear NPR's coverage of the President's address and follow-up analysis 0131-0200 *VOR MUSIC AROUND US: Accordions [3-073] 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: KHRUSHCHEV AND HIS ERA: Nikita Khrushchev's rants of "We will bury you!" and his shoe-pounding antics at the UN solidified him in the minds of the west as the personification of the communist threat. In fact, Khrushchev was a highly complex and intelligent man who served in several key campaigns against the Nazis, denounced Stalin in 1956, and was later ousted from power for perceived softness by Soviet hardliners. A major new biography has just appeared and its author is our guest this evening. WILLIAM TAUBMAN is professor of history at Amherst and his new book is Khrushchev: The Man and His Era. We will examine the tumultous times of this highly unusual leader, from the Soviet Revolution to Stalingrad and Kursk and all the way through the Cuban Missile Crisis 0300-XXXX *YPR Perspectives on American Western literature from the Montana Festival of the Book 0300-0400 *KQED National Press Club: Tom Ridge, the Secretary of Homeland Security. He'll report on the strides the department has made in the past 100 days in strengthening this country's domestic security 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Reporter Jack Laurence cut his teeth traveling with Charlie Company in Vietnam. More than 30 years later, he was embedded with the 101st Airborne Division in Iraq. Dick Gordon-- back from Baghdad - talks with Laurence about reporting in wartime % 1100-1130 *RN DOCUMENTARY: Mother of radio. The struggle to liberate the airwaves in South Africa. Bush Radio calls itself the mother of community radio in South Africa. Rightfully so. In the final years of apartheid, the people at Bush Radio in Capetown prepared for the moment the airwaves would be freed from state control. They trained broadcasters and they distributed their programmes on audio cassettes throughout the country. They planned their first illegal broadcast on May day, in 1993. Ten years later, Bush Radio sees its struggle in the sprawling townships around Capetown as the fight against poverty, HIV –AIDS % [+ 5965; see DAY for repeat times] 1430-1500 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: Preserving the rich Acadian heritage in Prince Edward Island. The advent of television and the passage of time have resulted in the slow disappearance of many old Acadian songs and stories on the island. Guest host Jeanette Kelly talks with a folklorist and historian who is working to ensure that these treasures of the past aren't lost forever. She'll also find out more about some of the colourful characters who are keeping these traditions alive in their communities [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1430-1500 *KUNM University Showcase, "UNM and the Economy of New Mexico." Higher education is a very important factor in a region's economic development. Tune in to hear University of New Mexico President Chris Garcia and Professor John Young, Special Advisor for Economic Development, discuss their views on these issues. Hosted by Jane Blume, and produced by Dick Frederiksen 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: Speaking With Forked Tongue: Michael Rosen presents the programme about words and the way we speak. The language of flattery and how to tell if someone is being sincere. [Rptd Sun, 1930] 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Jazz Legends: Bing Crosby: Julian Joseph and Geoffrey Smith explore the jazz recordings of the American entertainer who was born 100 years ago today. Selections include his work alongside Bix Beiderbecke in the Paul Whiteman Orchestra, collaborations with Duke Ellington and Lionel Hampton, a vaudeville style duo with Johnny Mercer and highlights from the score for the 1956 film High Society, composed by Cole Porter and featuring Bing Crosby in performance with Frank Sinatra and Louis Armstrong 1506-1600 *NPR DIANE REHM[non]: Azar Nafisi: Reading Lolita in Tehran (Random House) Azar Nafisi describes life in Iran after the 1979 revolution and talks about why, after being removed as a university professor, she took the risk of inviting a group of women to her home for discussions on great Western works of literature - banned books - including 1984, The Great Gatsby, and Nabokov's Lolita 1700-1800 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Erika Harold, Miss America 2003; topic: TBA 1700-1800 *KPBS BLOCKBUSTERS, BURGERS, AND BLUE JEANS: KPBS PRESENTS: From the BBC series, The Changing World, this two-part documentary investigates the Americanization of space and time. Cultural power comes after industrial power, so big buildings, big highways, and big dreams are followed by the commercial takeover of the calendar and the clock. Is American publicity the consciousness of us all? In considering this question, the program examines how the mall, a privatized public space, a cathedral of consumption, and the fast food sold in the "food court" have both become a global phenomenon — "McDonaldization" — and its cultural effects. (Part 2 airs Friday, May 9 at 1700) 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Friday Forum host Angie Coiro (Hour Two): (with guest host Dave Iverson) Forum talks with James Tobin, author of "To Conquer the Air: The Wright Brothers and the Great Race for Flight." Tobin won the National Book Critics Circle Award for his first book, "Ernie Pyle's War," and the J. Anthony Lukas Work-In Progress Award for "To Conquer the Air." 1707-2000 *WUOT FIRST FRIDAY REQUESTS & NEW RELEASES 1800-1830 *BBCR2 Blue Skies: The Work Of Irving Berlin: Henry Goodman, actor, singer, and presenter of last year's Radio 2 Gala Concert to celebrate the music of Richard Rodgers, introduces a six part series which showcases and re-evaluates the songs of Irving Berlin. The series, called 'Blue Skies: The Irving Berlin Story', begins tonight, and each part picks up on a different feature of the prolific composer. It begins with the uncanny knack Berlin had of catching the mood of America... 1830-1955 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: Cardiff Singers Series Presented by Humphrey Burton. To celebrate the 20th anniversary of BBC Singer of the World, the Finnish soprano Soile Isokoski returns to the home of the competition, St David's Hall in Cardiff, for the first time since she was a finalist herself in 1987. With her regular accompanist Marita Viitasalo she presents a popular programme of songs including: Gluck; A. Scarlatti; Schubert; Sibelius; Sallinen; Bernstein: I hate music!; R. Strauss... 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Alan Dershowitz, who discusses the fundamental principles of the "Declaration of Independence", and what they mean in today's society. Guest: Alan Dershowitz, Felix Frankfurter Professor of Law at Harvard Law School, and author of "America Declares Independence" (Wiley) 2100-2130 *BBCR2 The Music Never Ends: David Jacobs tells the story of multi-Oscar winning composer, Michel Legrand. Programme 5. A Piece Of Sky: Twenty years ago, Michel Legrand teamed up with Alan and Marilyn Bergman to create a new musical for Barbra Streisand. The result of their endeavours was 'Yentl' which Time Magazine called "the most romantic, coherent and sophisticated original score since Gigi"... 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Two editors of a new comprehensive guide to the history, policies, economics, religion and politics that helped lead to the current state of affairs in Iraq. Guests: Micah L. Sifry, editor of "The Iraq War Reader," and "The Gulf War Reader," senior analyst with Public Campaign, freelance writer and former editor and writer for "The Nation and Christopher Cerf, editor of "The Iraq War Reader," and "The Gulf War Reader, " former senior editor at Random House, and currently Creative Producer of "Between the Lions" 2115-2230 *BBCR3 Andy Kershaw: With music from Tidawt, a Touareg group from the ancient city of Agadez in Niger. Their performance was recorded at the Festival in the Desert near Timbuktu in January 2200-2230 *BBCR4 Great Lives: Geneticist Steve Jones chooses a 19th century fiddle- playing shepherd and writer James Hogg, for his intuitive understanding of the nature of madness. Author of the fantastically titled Private Memoirs And Confessions Of A Justified Sinner, Hogg was considered coarse and vulgar by the refined writers of genteel Edinburgh society, but Steve Jones believes that his talents have been overlooked. Joining him and presenter Humphrey Carpenter in the studio is Hogg biographer Karl Miller 2206-2300 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: Discusses the art and craft of newspaper column writing with Milwaukee Journal Sentinel metro columnist Jim Stingl. 2230-2400 *BBCR3 Jazz On 3: Paul Dunmall Moksha Big Band: Jez Nelson presents an exclusive studio session from leading UK saxophonist Paul Dunmall, in celebration of his 50th birthday. For the recording, Paul leads his Moksha Big Band in the premiere of his new work "I Wish You Peace". Dunmall's Big Band is a fourteen-piece group, containing a surprising mix of musicians - from the free jazz quartet Mujician, to contemporary classical horn players -with players coming in from France and Holland to share in the celebrations. A massive player in all senses of the word, Dunmall's reputation continues to grow, both here and abroad UT SAT MAY 3 SATURDAYS 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: The CBC McGill concert series presents soprano Suzie Leblanc, countertenor Daniel Taylor and Les Voix Humaines in a program called "Now is the Month of Maying". Songs about Springtime, by Monteverdi, Byrd, Bennett, Rameau and many others 0000-1300 *WHRB VILLAGE VANGUARD ORGY CONTINUES, resumes at 1700 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part Two of Regarding Islam. Since Sept. 11, 2001, the West's focus on Muslim countries has intensified. But so have old prejudices and ignorance both outside the Islamic world and within it. Vancouver writer/broadcaster Don Mowatt talks with leading scholars about aspects of Islam that have been completely ignored in the current debate [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0005-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: James Lipton, host of "Inside the Actor's Studio." 0030-XXXX *YPR Listener viewpoints on Your Opinion, Please 0100-XXXX *KUNM KUNM will broadcast live from Bookworks bookstore: Author Tom Robbins will read from his new novel, "Villa Incognito." In addition to the reading, this event will feature Robbins in a conversation with Albuquerque Journal pop culture columnist Leanne Potts. Robbins visits Albuquerque in the first leg of his book tour 0100-0300 *WNYCf Spinning on Air: Some (Mostly) New Things: David Garland spotlights new music from some recent guests on the show including French composer Sylvain Chauveau, Ed Askew, Greenpot Bluepot, Paul Revere and the Raiders, and guitarist Ronnie Prophet's "psycho- instrumental" version of "Ghost Riders in the Sky." 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: COSMOLOGY: Our understanding of the universe keeps changing and, thus, it is time for another one of our cosmology reviews. MICHAEL LEMONICK is our featured guest this evening. His new book Echo of the Big Bang examines the birth of the universe and all the questions inherent in the Big Bang. Our old friend ROCKY KOLB of the University of Chicago Department of Astrophysics joins in the discussion 0300-0400 *KQED Commonwealth Club: Jan Kavan, the President of the 57th session of the United Nations General Assembly. He is currently a Deputy in the Czech Parliament. How has the U.S. decision to attack Iraq affected the authority of the world's foremost peacekeeping institution? What exactly is the role of the United Nations in resolving international conflicts and assuring a lasting peace now? He will discuss the inherent challenges in coordinating all of the UN activities, from restoring order - to safeguarding humanitarian aid - to assisting in the birth of new nations, while assessing the current situation in Iraq 0345-0400 *BBCWS Write On: Dilly Barlow with listeners' questions and inquiries about the BBC World Service programmes, which are answered with the help of programme makers. Email: writeon@bbc.co.uk [repeats at 0845, 1345, 2345] 1200-1300 *BBCR3 World Routes: Last year the BBC's Late Junction label transported a recording studio to Guinea-Bissau, one of the most inaccessible of west African countries, to make the international debut album of one of Africa's rising stars, Manecas Costa - the first album ever recorded in that country. After years living in Lisbon, Manecas returned to his homeland to record his songs close to the traditions they spring from. The album, recorded at a beachside night-club in the capital Bissau, is released this month, and Lucy Duran tells the story of the making of the CD, and visits Cacheu, the home of Guinea-Bissau's traditional gumbe rhythm, once banned by the Portuguese colonists as being subversive 1630-1654 *BBCR4 Back Row: Racquel Welch fought his pterodactyls in One Million Years BC, and who can forget the skeleton fight in The 7th Voyage of Sinbad in 1958? Jim White meets the master of stop-motion animation, 83 year-old Ray Harryhausen. And, be afraid, be slightly afraid - why are horror films just not scary any more? 1700-2100 *KUAF PRINCESS MAGOGO OPERA – LIVE WORLD PREMIERE! [oops! that`s from the May 2002 daily schedule, the one currently on display. Wake up, KUAF, ``the 10th most listened to public radio station.`` -- Fayetteville, AR? Hard to believe...] 1700-2400 *WHRB VILLAGE VANGUARD ORGY continues 1900-2000 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: Theatre Of The Absurd: Martin Esslin, who died in 2002y, was the most influential figure in radio drama in the 1960s and 70s. As head of BBC Radio Drama for 14 years, he championed the work of Samuel Beckett, Bertolt Brecht, Vaclav Havel and Harold Pinter, bringing previously unheard playwrights to radio and to a wider audience. Esslin also coined the phrase "theatre of the absurd" in a book of the same name, and made it his mission to champion avant garde theatre. In this programme, Paul Allen reassesses Martin Esslins work, illustrated with extracts from many of his drama productions, interviews and broadcasts 2000-2100 *BBCR2 The History Of Psychedelia: David Quantick presents the first of a two-part documentary examining the changing face of psychedelic music and charting the progression of the psychedelic movement. Examining how LSD and Mescaline began as therapeutic and truth drugs, filtering through to artistic communities and mavericks like Ken Kesey and Dr. Tim Leary and how society has never been the same again after the profound effects of these mind bending substances. The programme asks all the big questions: Was paisley strictly necessary? Who was selling the best acid in San Francisco? What's the trippiest track of the sixties? Was the epicentre of Psychedelia really Edinburgh? How does it feel to take acid at 12 years old? What damage can it do? Looking at the progression of psychedelic music from avant garde to mainstream, look at how lyrics, instrumentation, studio techniques and the heady social atmosphere of rebellion moulded the music. Plus how American and British psychedelia compare and edging gently into progressive rock, when the flag of psychedelia was still flying. Also examining the overlooked contribution of black artists to psychedelia. Contributors include: Donovan, Simon Napier-Bell (Yardbirds manager and author of Black Vinyl. White Powder), Mike Heron of The Incredible String Band, Country Joe of seminal SF band Country Joe And The Fish, Dennis McNally, biographer of the Grateful Dead, Joe Boyd, producer of Pink Floyd, the Incredible String Band, Daevid Allen of Gong, Chris Dreja of The Yardbirds, Pye Hastings, Head Honcho of jazz psych band Caravan and Steve Hillage 2000-2100 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: We'll weigh the burdens of killer viruses, global warming, and environmental exhaustion on the human habitat 2115-2200 *BBCR4 The Reith Lectures 2003: The Emerging Mind. Neuroscience, The New Philosophy: Transforming our understanding of mankind and the cosmos. Professor Ramachandran 2130-XXXX *WABE Between the Lines: The Sakyong Mipham Rinpoche: Turning the Mind into an Ally UT SUN MAY 4 SUNDAYS 0000-0200 *WNYCf Concerts from the Frick Collection: The St. Petersburg String Quartet: In this second installment of the 2003 Concerts from the Frick Collection, the St. Petersburg String Quartet presents an all- Russian program featuring works by Shostakovich, Glazunov, and Tchaikovsky. WNYC's Margaret Juntwait hosts 0000-1500 *WHRB VILLAGE VANGUARD ORGY continues 0100-0200 *WBEZ Performance Space: World music pioneer David Amram and friends 0100-0200 *WQXR Chamber Music from the Kosciuszko Foundation - The Aspen Ensemble 0200-0300 *WOIa Prairie Lights: Former Iowa Arts Fellow Katy Lederer will read her first collection of poems "Winter Sex." % 0206-0415 *KCSCf NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC [non]LIVE: See Thu 2330 0445-0500 *BBCWa The Instant Guide The weekly guide to a person, a place, a space or an idea in the news that will answer the questions you've been longing to ask - and many others you'd never even thought of: Iraq`s Info Minister 1211-1500 *CBCR1 The Sunday Edition: Norman Spector walks through the new road map for peace in the Middle East. Also, a singer who is definitely going out on a high note: outstanding Canadian mezzo soprano Catherine Robbin says farewell while her voice is still in peak form. Also, an interview with the only Westerner ever to escape from the clutches of the Khmer Rouge. He developed an ongoing dialogue with his captor, a man responsible for thousands of deaths. Now he's written a book about it [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1230-1300 *BBCR4 Law Of The Amazon: First of two programmes in which Clive Anderson takes a trip down the Amazon with a judge to find out how justice is dispensed in the thick of the Brazilian jungle 1400-1500 *BBCR3 Private Passions: Michael Berkeley meets the astrophysicist Malcolm Longair, Jacksonian Professor of Natural Philosophy at the Cavendish Laboratory in Cambridge. The new edition of his book, Theoretical Concepts in Physics, is a highly original approach to theoretical reasoning in physics, illuminating the subject from the perspective of research scientists. Music is another of Malcolm Longair's passions, and in today's programme he brings insight and enthusiasm to bear on works by Handel, Wagner, John Adams, Messiaen and Oscar Peterson 1506-1530 *BBCWS ASSIGNMENT: Torture and terror in the Arap Moi regime [3-076] 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Poetry Please: Roger McGough introduces popular poems, among them some sonnnets by the poet and painter Dante Gabriel Rossetti, the 175th anniversary of whose birth falls this week [Rptd Sat 2230] 1600-1645 *BBCR4 Fallout At Maralinga: For half a century, the aboriginal people of Maralinga have waited to get to get their land back. This year they do. Professor John Keane explores how the British commandeered their land from 1957 to 1963 to conduct atomic tests, and how far aboriginal people, servicemen and the environment were put at risk in the name of the Cold War 1600-1645 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Art or artifice? Sarah Walker explores the mechanics of Ravel's beguiling ballet suite Ma Mère l'Oye. With specially recorded musical illustrations by the BBC Concert Orchestra/Peter Stark 1630-2400 *WHRB VILLAGE VANGUARD ORGY resumes 1645-1730 *BBCR3 Sunday Feature: The John Tusa Interview: Continuing his series of conversations with some of the world's greatest artistic originators. This week he meets the architect Renzo Piano. 1730-1745 *BBCWa The Instant Guide: Iraq`s Info Minister 1806-1900 *WPRi To The Best of our Knowledge: 'The bearded lady/tried a jar/she's now/a famous movie star/Burma-shave.' Jingles like that could be found on signs across America's highways between the 1930's and the 1950's. In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, the story behind the legendary Burma-Shave advertising campaign. Also, the evolution of those small plastic car-plaques - the Jesus fish and the Darwin fish % 1900-1930 *BBCR4 A World In Your Ear: Emily Buchanan presents highlights from English-language radio programmes from around the world 1906-2000 *WPRi To The Best of our Knowledge: From Boston to Berkeley, people are going raw. Vegetarians, vegans and Atkins followers are old hat – the hottest trend in food is cool. In this hour of To the Best of Our Knowledge, why the raw food movement has people turning off their ovens and trumpeting the healing powers of uncooked food. Also, an inside look at the kosher food industry and globetrotting rabbis who make sure food is fit for faith. And a food artist says it's OK to play with your food % 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: Speaking With Forked Tongue: Michael Rosen presents the programme about words and the way we speak. The language of flattery and how to tell if someone is being sincere 2005-2100 *CBCR2 Say It With Music: Gypsy! This past week saw the opening of the fourth major New York revival of this classic musical. Richard revisits the original 1959 recording with Ethel Merman, and offers up points of comparison with three other ladies who've played the awesome role of Mama Rose on Broadway: Angela Lansbury, Tyne Daley and Bernadette Peters. Curtain up, light the lights! 2006-2100 *WPRi University of the Air: His name has become synonymous with fabricated evidence and the suppression of dissent. But for a time Wisconsin Senator Joseph McCarthy was one of the most powerful men in the country. What led to his success and where did he go wrong? 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Analysis: With Friends Like These: European hopes for a common foreign and security policy have suffered their worst blow ever as a result of the Anglo-American war against Iraq and Franco-German opposition to it. Is it time for Europe's pro and anti-Atlanticists to go their separate ways? Bruce Clark weighs the costs of a split and asks if a reconciliation based on long-term common interests is still achievable 2200-2300 *WOSUf SPOLETO CHAMBER MUSIC SERIES season premiere 2200-2300 *KUAF THE STORY OF AFRICA – Segment One: Apartheid – the struggle against the white South African Government Segment Two: The Nation State 2200-2300 *WGBH ARTS & IDEAS: At the Edge of Asia, Part 1, from The Changing World series, focuses on North and South Korea 2200-XXXX *WBEZ America Abroad: The long history of America's relationship with Europe is analyzed [all 3 hours?] 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Something Understood: Deeds Not Dared: Mark Tully draws on a line from poet, Elizabeth Jennings to begin his exploration of our fear of giving up our securities. In Ghosts Jennings wrote: "The deeds we dared not act they flaunt." Why do we allow such fear, such lack of daring, to stop us living life more fully and moving forward into a more creative future? 2300-2400 *WCNY Discography with Chuck Klaus: A BRAHMS BIRTHDAY BASH. To celebrate the anniversary of the birth of Johannes Brahms, we'll feature some notable early Brahms recordings, including one made by Brahms himself. Also featured will be performances by Wilhelm Furtwangler, the Berlin Philharmonic Orchestra, and Herman and Adolph Bush 2300-2400 *WUOL ON ANOTHER NOTE: "Howard Hanson: A Composer for His Time" 2300-2400 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: The Changing World: The Giving Game I 2315-2345 *BBCR4 A Little Of What You Fancy: Programme 1: Tim Healey looks at how the Music Hall dominated Victorian and Edwardian popular culture. Whilst the saucy songs of people like Marie Lloyd caused concern for the nation's morality, it was the obligatory purchase of alcohol to gain entry to the "free" entertainment which worried people like General Booth. Public health inspectors may also have raised an eyebrow at one particularly nasty incident involving the death of an elephant below stage. Too large to move, it remained putrefying far too long for the audience's good 2330-2400 *KQED Hot Soup: "The Presence of the Past." A look at the legacies of past generations and how they still linger in modern life. A Mexican man discovers his Punjabi past, a granddaughter considers words of wisdom taped by her late grandfather when she was young, two brothers fight over a favorite childhood record, and a woman who grew up with three languages tries to bridge the gaps of language, culture, time, and love with her parents [repeat at 0130] UT MON MAY 5 MONDAYS 0000-0100 *WBEZ Sunday night specials: Radiant Dissonance 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILES: Leonard Hokanson: Professor of Piano at the Indiana University School of Music, Leonard Hokanson is internationally recognized as a recitalist, soloist, chamber musician, and lieder pianist, and has performed with such major ensembles as the Philadelphia Orchestra, Berlin Philharmonic, Rotterdam Philharmonic, and Vienna Symphony. One of the last pupils of the legendary Artur Schnabel, his awards include the Steinway Prize of the City of Boston and the Busoni Competition of Bolzono, Italy. (Originally aired May 20, 2001) 0000-0100 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: The Infinite Mind: Childhood's End 0000-1700 *WHRB THE VILLAGE VANGUARD ORGY CONTINUES 0100-0200 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: American Mavericks: Tradition-Breaking Composers Who Shaped the Development of American Music 0100-0200 *WFIU Founding Fathers: In this documentary, history filmmaker Ken Burns, philosopher Jacob Needleman, and others examine the genius of our country's Founders and how they intended American freedom as a way to protect an individual's right to obey the dictates of his or her own conscience. The program was recorded at Jefferson's Monticello, Independence Hall in Philadelphia, and elsewhere, and features beautiful period music 0100-0200 *WNYCf Mad About Music: Rafael Viñoly: It would have been hard to open the cultural page of a newspaper recently without reading about architect Rafael Viñoly. His impressive designs showed up as a finalist in the competition to rebuild the World Trade Center, as a commission for two new buildings at Kennedy Center in Washington, a new concert hall for jazz programs of Lincoln Center, and the opening of his acclaimed Kimmel Center for the Performing Arts in Philadelphia, containing a new concert hall for the Philadelphia Orchestra. All very impressive, especially for a man who almost pursued a career as a concert pianist. On this edition of Mad About Music, Rafael Viñoly stops by to discuss his passions in music and architecture. % later plus transcript 0100-0400 *WNYCa Radio Lab: Food Therapy: Stories about food. All kinds! Food therapy (nothing like baked goods to make you feel better) and food for thought 0130-0200 *KQED Hot Soup: "The Presence of the Past." A look at the legacies of past generations and how they still linger in modern life. A Mexican man discovers his Punjabi past, a granddaughter considers words of wisdom taped by her late grandfather when she was young, two brothers fight over a favorite childhood record, and a woman who grew up with three languages tries to bridge the gaps of language, culture, time, and love with her parents 0200-0300 *CAINAN ARTS & IDEAS: Joe Frank: The Dark End of the Bar 0200-0300 *KUSP Remarkable Radio: "Children of War: Fighting, Dying, Surviving." This special program takes you to the battlegrounds and refugee camps affecting millions of children around the globe. What is being done to make the world safer for children? You'll hear about child soldiers, children fleeing conflict, and the physical and psychological rehabilitation of children touched by war 0200-0300 *WFIU "The Meaning of Maverick": In the late 19th century, every nation had a particular sonic imprint - French music sounded a certain way, German music sounded another way, and so on for Italian, Czech and English music. American composers had to create a national music from scratch, and found that to do so they needed to free themselves from the strictures of European music taught in school. George Antheil: Ballet Mecanique Bartok Henry Brant: Ice Field John Cage: Sonatas and Interludes Henry Cowell: The Tides of Mananaun, Piano Concerto Morton Feldman: "For Samuel Beckett" Charles Ives: Quartertone Piano Pieces, Symphony No. 4, "Three Places in New, England" Symphony No. 2 Meredith Monk: Atlas Conlon Nancarrow: Study No. 3A Pauline Oliveros: Deep Listening Leo Ornstein: Suicide In an Airplane Harry Partch: Castor and Pollux Steve Reich: Drumming Carl Ruggles: Sun-Treader 0200-0300 *WOIa The Memoirs of Frank Stanton: Narrated by CBS' 60 Minutes correspondent Mike Wallace, this program features Frank Stanton's remembrances of his life and career, as told to the Oral History Department of Columbia University in a series of interviews spanning 10 years. Stanton - who has been called "the conscience of broadcasting" and the "greatest broadcast executive of all time" - was also a confidante of U.S. presidents from Harry S. Truman to Lyndon B. Johnson. He was the driving force behind the formulation of televised debates between presidential candidates, starting with the Kennedy-Nixon debates of 1960 0200-0330 *WOIf University Concert: Marian Anderson String Quartet: Perkinson: String Quartet No. 1; Singleton: Somehow We Can; Dvorak: String Quartet No. 12, F, Op. 96, "American." 0245-0300 *BBCWe INSTANT GUIDE: Iraq`s Info Minister 0300-0400 *KUSC THORNTON CENTER STAGE: A Bundle of Sticks - the bassoon show 0400-0500 *WBEZ Performance Space: World music pioneer David Amram and friends 0500-0600 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Greg Bear, the award-winning author of "Darwin's Radio," and its new sequel, "Darwin's Children." They'll talk about society's reaction when viruses emerge that we don't understand, not unlike the global actions now being taken for SARS. Moira will also speak with Alan Deutschman. Previously the Silicon Valley correspondent for Fortune magazine, he'll tell us about the throngs of technically-hip people who have migrated to California'' wine country, seeking the good life, and possibly destroying what made it the good life in the first place 1500-1530 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Sheila Dillon looks at the history of the countryside, examining how the Enclosures transformed much of England from open moorlands, heaths, forests and fens to the hedged and walled strip fields that remain in much of the country. Returning to today's landscape she considers the intensive large scale farming of our modern age, and the growing move towards farming practices dedicated to protecting the environment rather than boosting production. National Trust farmers talk how they are now matching their livestock and farming methods to the landscape to ensure that it remains intact, moving away from the high yield large animals of modern farming to the smaller traditional breeds who damage the landscape less. Plus new produce is now promoted in the local pubs and restaurants to encourage regionally distinct flavours and foods. Finally, Sheila explores the links between agriculture and art at the Soil Associations organic farms exhibition 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: After being expelled from her university during the Iranian revolution, Professor Azar Nafisi gathered a group of women in her home to discuss works of forbidden western novels. Nafisi's new memoir, "Reading Lolita in Tehran." 1700-XXXX *KUNI KUNI Presents Dr. William F. Schulz: The executive director of Amnesty International USA since 1994, Dr. William F. Schulz recently spoke at the University of Northern Iowa. "In Our Own Best Interest," his book published in April, addresses how defending human rights benefits us all 1700-2400 *WHRB TIMBRES, ESPACE, MOUVEMENT: THE HENRI DUTILLEUX ORGY: Born in Angers in 1916, Henri Dutilleux is perhaps France's greatest living composer. An extremely self-critical artist, he has limited his output to a few works that have gained the respect of musicians and audiences alike. While he disowned everything he wrote prior to his 1948 Piano Sonata, we will include several of the very early works which have become part of the standard performing repertoire. His middle and later works bear all the marks of one of the most refined and original compositional voices in recent years 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: Press Freedom Day: Guests: Joel Simon, Committee to Protect Journalists; Vjollca Shtylla, International Center for Journalism % 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): (with guest host Spencer Michels) Forum talks to Warren Zimmermann about the history of American imperialism. Zimmermann was the former US Ambassador to Yugoslavia and the author of "Origins of a Catastrophe: Yugoslavia and Its Destroyers" and "First Great Triumph: How Five Americans Made Their Country a Great Power." 1806-1900 *WNYCf Soundcheck: Cinco de Mayo: Join us for the fiesta as we celebrate the music and popular culture of Mexico on Soundcheck today. Music writer Larry Birnbaum provides a guided tour of 100 years of mariachi music, and discuss such Mexican pop culture icons as film star and singer Vicente Fernandez, his singer-son Alejandro Fernandez, and Placido Domingo. Then, the party heats up with interviews and a live performance from the Grammy-winning band Mariachi Real de Mexico, a band that plays weddings, fiestas, and even once at Bruce Springsteen's birthday party. Members Ramon Ponces and his son, Ramon Ponces, Jr. helped form the Mariachi Association of New York, which united 12 mariachi bands, and helped create a mariachi school for young people. What makes this form of music so popular? Ponce Jr. explained, "If you are happy, if you are down --- if you want to be romantic, there is going to be a song for that special moment," Ponce said. "I think that's why people like mariachi music a lot." Viva la musica de Mexico! % 1900-1930 *BBCR4 Which Way Are We Facing? In the first part of a new series, Gavin Esler asks if we are becoming closer to Europe or to America 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: Libya: Rosie Goldsmith reports from a state governed by Colonel Gaddafi's personal brand of revolutionary socialism. But is this controlled society about to open up? 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Was It A Bird Or Was It A Plane? Howard Stableford explores what we have learned from birds in our quest to build the perfect flying machine 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Christian missionaries - mainline and evangelical - want to go to Iraq to provide humanitarian relief. But their presence would be troubling for many Muslims who are suspicious that aid is just a cover for their true motive - converting Muslims to Christianity. We'll hear from two individuals with opposing views: Charles Kimball, a Baptist minister and author of "When Religion Becomes Evil," and Albert Mohler, a leader in the conservative evangelical movement 2030-2115 *BBCR3 Night Waves: Phillip Dodd presents a special debate to coincide with the launch of the Arts Council's Decibel Project. Recorded in front of an audience in Manchester, the panel, which includes CRE Chair Trevor Philips and author of the Meaning of Race, Keenan Malik discuss the reality beyond the rhetoric of "cultural diversity", and consider whether it is a creative or divisive force in our society 2115-2300 *BBCR3 Late Junction: Fiona Talkington begins a week of specially-made recordings from Edinburgh's Across The North Sea festival with music by Varttina and Utla. Her featured artist all week is Norwegian percussionist and composer Terje Isungset, there are tracks from a new album by Keith Jarrett, and throughout the week, different versions of Charles Mingus' tribute to Lester Young "Goodbye Pork Pie Hat" 2206-2300 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: A critical look at the people behind America's peace movement. Kathleen speaks with David Horowitz, co-author of "Who Is The Peace Movement?" President CENTER FOR THE STUDY OF POPULAR CULTURE 2306-2400 *WMUB Interconnect - Pressure Groups and Textbook Censorship. Guest: author Diane Ravitch UT TUE MAY 6 TUESDAYS 0000-0100 *KGOU SPECIAL: TBA 0000-1100 *WHRB THE VILLAGE VANGUARD ORGY CONCLUDES 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Conclusion of When the Machine Awakes. Twenty years ago, Montreal writer George Tombs crossed Europe on foot, walking from Dublin to Jerusalem, in a spiritual quest. In this series, George revisits the pilgrim's way. He meets spiritual people and leading scientists, to find out whether science is a threat to spiritual values, or an ongoing challenge and source of enrichment [+1/2/3/4 h] 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: Oil companies play an interesting role in world politics. To secure drilling rights, they sometimes pay millions of dollars in legitimate funds to governments with lucrative oil fields. But how do the governments use their oil wealth? 0006-0100 *WPRi On Point: why breathtaking photographs of the Arctic National Wildlife Refuge are stoking up political fires in Washington 0106-0200 *WPRi Joy Cardin: It's time for a saner, and more permissive, approach to drug use . That's according to Joy Cardin's guest after eight who says illegal drug use should be viewed the same way as drinking Guest: Jacob Sullum, author, most recently, of "Saying Yes: In Defense of Drug Use" published by Tarcher-Putnam. He is a senior editor at Reason magazine http://www.reason.com 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Christian missionaries - mainline and evangelical - want to go to Iraq to provide humanitarian relief. But their presence would be troubling for many Muslims who are suspicious that aid is just a cover for their true motive - converting Muslims to Christianity. We'll hear from two individuals with opposing views: Charles Kimball, a Baptist minister and author of "When Religion Becomes Evil," and Albert Mohler, a leader in the conservative evangelical movement 0300-0400 *KQED World Affairs Council: "The Evolving Dynamics of U.S.-China Relations." Tonight's speaker is Zbigniew Brezinzki, National Security Advisor to President Carter. In recent months, our eyes have turned towards Iraq and the hunt for Al Qaeda, while the U.S. and China have quietly achieved warmer relations. How should the current relationship be viewed and what can we expect for the future? How does America view China as a "strategic competitor" and what are the implications of this relationship in a changing global environment 0300-0400 *WUMB AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: The charismatic Georges Collinet brings us contemporary popular music from Africa and beyond. "Tropical Delight en Espanol." You'll hear a dance music lover's treat from Puerto Rico, New York, Cuba, and the Dominican Republic 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: After being expelled from her university during the Iranian revolution, Professor Azar Nafisi gathered a group of women in her home to discuss works of forbidden western novels. On The Connection after ten, Nafisi's new memoir, "Reading Lolita in Tehran." [also WHYY] 0506-0600 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Rebroadcast): (with guest host Spencer Michels) Forum talks to Warren Zimmermann about the history of American imperialism. Zimmermann was the former US Ambassador to Yugoslavia and the author of "Origins of a Catastrophe: Yugoslavia and Its Destroyers" and "First Great Triumph: How Five Americans Made Their Country a Great Power." 1100-2300 *WHRB THE MUSIC OF WALES ORGY: This Orgy presents music of Y Fro Gymraeg. Y Fro Gymraeg is a term used to discuss Welsh-speaking Wales, consisting of approximately a half million people out of a total population of three million whose "mode of everyday communication is largely through the Welsh language, and whose cultural transactions take place primarily through forms and institutions specific to that language. Welsh-language popular music took on its present-day, recognizably modern shape in the 1960s, fueled by a burgeoning of cultural assertiveness in the traditionally Welsh- speaking, largely rural areas of the west and North." This Orgy will explore 3 major waves of Welsh-language music, from the 1960s until the present, and the great variety of musical genres represented. It will also attempt to situate these waves in the historical and societal contexts which gave them rise as the battle for the survival of the Welsh language waged, and indeed, still wages on 1400-1500 *KMUW WHOLE WIDE WORLD: Weighs the burdens of killer viruses, global warming, and environmental exhaustion on the human habitat 1430-1500 *BBCWe Music Review: Opera In The 21st Century: Stephanie Hughes talks to American composer John Adams whose pioneering operas deal with contemporary political issues 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Shop Talk: What was yesterday's luxury is today's necessity. Heather Payton and guests ask what premium brand companies have to do to stay exclusive 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Voices: The Four Temperaments: The notion of temperament originated with Galen, the Greek physician of the 2nd Century AD. Iain Burnside finds songs that match the 4 temperaments: sanguine, phlegmatic, melancholic and choleric. Includes songs by Schubert, Mahler, Dowland, Charles Trenet, Monty Python and Joni Mitchell 1530-1600 *BBCWa Music Review: Opera In The 21st Century Stephanie Hughes talks to some of today's cutting-edge opera composers to find out the kind of subjects that inspire opera today. This week: American composer John Adams whose pioneering operas deal with contemporary political issues 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: US / Saudi Relations: Guests: Mamoun Fendi, Washington Bureau Chief, Asharq al-Awsat (Saudi Newspaper based in London); Hume Horan, former ambassador to Saudi Arabia. The United States has announced its intention to move military forces out of Saudi Arabia. Our guests will discuss the impact of these actions and what they might mean to the restructuring of the U.S. - Saudi relationship % 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Michael Krasny talks to science writer Michael Lemonick about the latest news from the edge of the universe. Guest: Michael Lemonick, senior science writer for Time Magazine. His books include "The Light at the Edge of the Universe" and "Other Worlds." His latest book is "Echo of the Big Bang." 1800-2100 *BBCR2 various music series; see also DAY 1800-1900 *BBCR2 Evelyn Glennie's Classics: World renowned percussionist, Evelyn Glennie, presents the second in an eight part series showcasing popular classics. The Grammy award-winner, who also has an OBE, is involved in a consortium with James Galway, Julian Lloyd Webber and Michael Kamen, in an attempt to lobby for better music provision in schools. In tonight's programme, Evelyn features music from Benjamin Britten's Soirees Musicales, Verdi's opera La Forza Del Destino, Bizet's Carmen, Telemann's Concerto in F for Recorder and Strings, the First movement from Beethoven's Emperor Concerto, Franck's Panis Angelis, and Hymn To The Dance, by Karl Jenkins with the Adiemus Singers. This week's soundtrack is from Schindler's List, this week's composer is Handel, and Evelyn plays with the Black Dyke Band 1900-1940 *BBCR4 Notes Of Uncertainty: John Wilson investigates the state of the classical music industry. Can it overcome the challenges including an ageing concert audiences, increased competition from other musical forms and a growing number of younger educated consumers who seem uninterested? And why do so many people within the classical musical world object so vociferously to innovations like crossover music and marketing tricks picked up from the pop business? [Rptd Sun 1600] 1930-2000 *BBCWe Music Review: Opera In The 21st Century: see 1530 1930-2030 *BBCR2 Bing: The Greatest Of Them All? Pat Boone presents a portrait of American entertainer, Bing Crosby. In the third and final episode, he examines Bing's private tragedy, the death of his first wife, Dixie Lee, to cancer, and of his feelings for new women in his life, culminating in his courtship of and ultimate marriage to Kathryn Grandstaff 2030-2100 *BBCR2 Diggin' Diz: In the third of a six part series, Guy Barker profiles the life and music of trumpeter, composer, vocalist, percussionist and pianist, Dizzy Gillespie. Tonight Guy Barker examines Gillespie's role in the development of Latin Jazz. With contributions from percussionist Airto Moreira, trumpeter Benny Bailey, Alyn Shipton, Lalo Schifrin and Dizzy Gillespie himself. Plus, music from Gillespie, Machito, James Moody and Stevie Wonder 2130-2200 *BBCWa Music Review: Opera In The 21st Century: see 1530 2130-2200 *KCRW DESIGN & ARCHITECTURE: Simon Doonan, author and Creative Director for Barneys New York, talks about whackiest chicks in LA 2300-XXXX *WHRB THE SERGEI PROKOFIEV ORGY: Born April 23, 1891, in Sontsovk, in the Ukraine, Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev is one of the major composers of the twentieth century. He attended the St. Petersburg Conservatory from 1904 to 1914, and studied under musicians such as Glière, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Tcherepnin. Although he was recognized as a young man of undeniable talent, his fiery, stubborn, sharply candid, and brash personality earned him the disfavor of some. Prokofiev was part of the new breed of anti-Romantics, working against the tradition stemming from the music of Chopin and Liszt. His earlier works are noted for harsh and strident dissonances – despite complaints from his teachers and critics – but his later music adapts a more lyrical and popular style. Through the course of this orgy, we will hear the innovation and evolution of his music and celebrate his mastery of a wide range of musical genres, including symphonies, film scores, operas, ballets, cantatas, and chamber and solo instrumental works [72 hours straight until Friday 2300] UT WED MAY 7 WEDNESDAYS 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part Two of Blue Metropolis Bleu. Paul Kennedy reports from an international and multilingual literary festival in Montreal, where authors from around the world discuss culture, politics, nationalism and language [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *WPRi On Point: "Fast Food Nation" author Eric Schlosser now takes us inside America's illicit, enormous underground economy. 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: Historian Douglas Brinkley on Henry Ford, his company and a century of progress 0106-0200 *MichR The Connection: The debate over whether the new Chinese leadership is rising to the challenge of a highly infectious and mysterious disease...or reverting to its old imperialist see-no- evil ways 0130-0200 *BBCWS Music Review: Opera In The 21st Century: see Tue 1530 0200-XXXX *KING LIVE BY GEORGE: Music of Latin America to highlight the SSO Viva La Musica series featuring performances of Cuarteto Latinoamericano and the Eroica Trio 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: The debate over whether the new Chinese leadership is rising to the challenge of a highly infectious and mysterious disease...or reverting to its old imperialist see-no-evil ways 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: The New Yorker's Jon Lee Anderson. He went to Baghdad before the bombs fell, stayed as the tanks rolled in, and after the city collapsed. We get his perspective from the cramped, smoky quarters in the Palestine Hotel 0430-0500 *KUOW RADIO INTERSECTION: Jim Puckett of Basel Action Network - The mighty computer chip has become ubiquitous in American homes and business. Those tiny electronic brains are not only present in computers and televisions but increasingly in clocks, toasters and other domestic appliances. They often make our lives more comfortable, maybe even easier. But there is a dark side to the chip that environmentalists in Silicon Valley, Seattle and elsewhere are now beginning to better understand. Among them is Jim Puckett, a former toxics waste organiser with Greenpeace who is now with the Seattle-based Basel Action Network. Puckett tells KUOW producer Gordon Black about the perils of recycling computers - both for workers in Asia, and for the environment % 1130-1200 *RN DOCUMENTARY: In the early 20th century a British General claimed his country was going to Mesopotamia to liberate it from the Ottomans. It was Gertrude Bell, a remarkable woman from the empire who drew the borders of the country call Iraq and planted the first king on its throne. Not even a century later history is repeating itself. Only this time it is the Americans who are liberating the country in the name of their new empire. Lines in the Sand, Claiming Mesopotamia is produced and presented by Dheera Sujan [see DAY for some repeat times] % +5965 1206-1300 *WPRi Joy Cardin: The combat in Iraq is winding down, but when will the France-bashing end? Join Joy Cardin's guest, after seven, who says that disagreeing with France's foreign policy doesn't mean you have to hate all things French. Guest: Sebastien Taveau (tah-VOH), French citizen and permanent US resident. His essay on anti-French protests appeared in the April 28th issue of Newsweek Article: http://www.msnbc.com/news/902633.asp?0bl=0 1305-1330 *BBCWe WATER WALKS series continues, see DAY or last week 1405-1430 *BBCWe DISCOVERY series on water continues, see DAY or last week 1406-1500 *NPR DIANE REHM: French Ambassador Jean-David Levitte: The French ambassador to the U.S. joins Diane to talk about why the relationship between our two countries has fallen on hard times, the values and interests we share, the French perspective on top international issues, and more 1406-1500 *WPRi The Connection: The Bush Administration is cracking down on educational exchanges with Havana. The trips, they argue, do little more than legitimize the regime. Critics are decrying the move, saying it severs a cultural lifeline, for both countries 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed: Laurie Taylor talks to Professor Beverley Skeggs about why white working-class women are popularly portrayed as a threat to the moral fabric of the nation 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: Art created by the unquiet...or the criminal... mind offers a window into a world inaccessible by other means. A conversation about the artistic value and particular appeal of outsider art 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Case Notes: Obesity is reaching epidemic proportions in the UK. Does dieting really make you fat or is it all in the genes? Graham Easton looks at the factors surrounding what we eat and why 1612-1700 *WCPN Around Noon: Host Dee Perry introduces listeners to world- renowned classical pianist and conductor Mitsuko Uchida, currently in her first season as artist-in-residence with The Cleveland Orchestra. Dee joins her today at Severance Hall for an intimate discussion about her career and the new multi-year project to perform all of Mozart's piano concertos. Uchida also explains how she's able to perform the difficult task of conducting a full orchestra while playing the piano at the same time 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: The Big Bang, The Buddha, and the Baby Boom is a new book by Wes "Scoop" Nisker. Rachel Anne Goodman talks to the humorist about the 60's. Also: a new policy about relations between professors and students is up for consideration at the end of the month. Does the power dynamic between any professor and any student mean they should never date? 1806-1900 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: The release of Joseph McCarthy's secret transcripts gives the world a fresh look at an infamous chapter in American history. They tell a story of intimidation and ruthless manipulation. We'll take a look at what the documents revealed 1900-2000 *BBCR2 Mike Harding: Mike Harding takes a fascinating look into the work of song collector, John Howson, the man behind the Veteran label, which has released many a collection of otherwise forgotten traditional material from the four corners of Britain. John picks some favourites from the 23 years he has been running Veteran and tells how long forgotten tape boxes often contain some classic cuts. Plus, there's music from the legendary Packie Byrne, Liam Farrell and Joe Whelan, and Mike's usual selection impeccable selection of folk, roots and acoustic music 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: In the Rape of Nanking, writer Iris Chang told the dramatic story of Japanese atrocities committed against Chinese people. Her latest tale is equally compelling, taking on 150 years of the Chinese experience in America. Chang joins host Neal Conan to discuss her new work 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Frontiers: Although almost blind, army ants deploy pheromones so effectively they can create traffic lanes running to and from their nest. Peter Evans investigates ants' extraordinary ability to self-organise when he meets scientists who take their inspiration from ant organisation. From traffic flow to systems analysis to robots, ants are influencing the way we solve problems. Some are now wondering whether ants will eventually give us insights into other emergent properties, in particular how the neurones in our brain combine to produce intelligence 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Charlie Gillett Without Frontiers: Brothers And Sisters: In the penultimate programme in this second series, Charlie Gillett looks at how musicians from a number of different countries have interpreted the subject in their own particular style. While this week's programme has a concentration of American artists, the range of performers and musical styles is as diverse as ever. The music ranges from a 1939 recording by the Bolick Brothers, who perform here under the name The Blue Sky Boys, to a track from the newly released album by The Dixie Chicks, whose band members include sisters Emily Robinson and Martie Maguire 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Former Labor Secretary Robert Reich joins Kathleen Dunn to discuss President Bush's post-war domestic agenda. Guest: Robert Reich, Professor of Economics and Social Policy BRANDEIS UNIVERSITY former Secy of Labor – under President Clinton 1992-1996 "The Future of Success: Working and Living in the New Economy" 2230-2300 *CBCR1 Dispatches: Confronting North Korea: trying to avoid an Iraq- style solution to deal with this part of America's "Axis Of Evil." North Koreans have plans of their own [+1/2/3/4 hours] 2300-2400 *WFMU "Are You Ready?" FEMA's all-purpose survival maunal [sic] on Read 'Em and Weep with Bronwyn C. If copyediting were a survival skill, these guys would be dead already. Available FREE from the FEMA publications warehouse, 1-800-480-2520; request publication H-34. Your tax dollars at work UT THU MAY 8 THURSDAYS 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: a salute to the 50th birthday of Valery Gergiev, the celebrated Russian conductor and Artistic Director of St. Petersburg's Mariinksy Theatre, home to the Kirov Orchestra, Opera and Ballet. The program features Gergiev in conversation, plus highlights from some of the more than 40 sets of recordings he's made for Philips over the past 25 years, as well as some of the still-to-be-released recordings of the Shostakovitch wartime symphonies 0000-2400 *WHRB THE SERGEI PROKOFIEV ORGY: Born April 23, 1891, in Sontsovk, in the Ukraine, Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev is one of the major composers of the twentieth century. He attended the St. Petersburg Conservatory from 1904 to 1914, and studied under musicians such as Glière, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Tcherepnin. Although he was recognized as a young man of undeniable talent, his fiery, stubborn, sharply candid, and brash personality earned him the disfavor of some. Prokofiev was part of the new breed of anti-Romantics, working against the tradition stemming from the music of Chopin and Liszt. His earlier works are noted for harsh and strident dissonances – despite complaints from his teachers and critics – but his later music adapts a more lyrical and popular style. Through the course of this orgy, we will hear the innovation and evolution of his music and celebrate his mastery of a wide range of musical genres, including symphonies, film scores, operas, ballets, cantatas, and chamber and solo instrumental works [72 hours straight until Friday 2300] 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part One of War Science: Weapons and Warriors. Heavy machine guns, rapid firing rifles, barbed wire, gas, trenches, tanks - the technologies of the First World War created a four-year stalemate and a ghastly slaughterhouse. The Canadian Corps, led by two remarkable officers, Julian Byng and Arthur Currie, was open to ideas from every direction and powerfully affected the course of "Canada's Greatest War." A retrospective by Gilbert Reid [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0100-0200 *WFUV Special: "American Mavericks" - "It Don`t Mean a Thing, If It Ain`t Got That Swing""; hosted by Suzanne Vega 0100-0300 *WBEZ Special: Live Odyssey program on dissent and its role in a democracy 0106-0200 *MichR THE CONNECTION: Culture and politics in Cuba 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: GULAG: THE FORGOTTEN TRAGEDY: In the dark annals of 20th century horrors, only a few surpassed that of the Soviet Gulag, through which some 18 million people passed between 1929 and 1953, and where at least 4.5 million perished. An acronym for Glavnoye Upravleniye Lagerei (Main Camp Administration), the Gulag has been graphically detailed in Solzhenitzyn's Gulag Archipelago and other Russian sources but remains misunderstood in the West. ANNE APPLEBAUM, a veteran reporter and expert on Eastern Europe, and our guest this evening, tries to correct this problem with a major new work: Gulag: A History. Our look into one of the great tragedies of the 20th century 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: The Bush Administration is cracking down on educational exchanges with Havana. The trips, they argue, do little more than legitimize the regime. On The Connection after nine, critics are decrying the move, saying it severs a cultural lifeline, for both countries 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: In this week's program, we'll hear about the authors of global consciousness and see our world through the eyes of prophetic writers 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Art created by the unquiet...or the criminal... mind offers a window into a world inaccessible by other means. A conversation about the artistic value and particular appeal of outsider art 1406-1500 *WPRi The Connection: Critics are calling the $1.4 billion settlement designed to punish Wall Street a hand slap to wealthy firms that gave crooked advice. And they're worried nothing will change. Cleaning Up a Culture of Corruption 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Music Restored: Casanova And Music: Lucie Skeaping introduces a concert from St George's, Bristol, in which the harpsichordist Sophie Yates and actor Timothy West explore some little-known aspects of the life of the notorious womaniser - a life full of contrasts. Music includes pieces by Francois Couperin, Rameau, Handel and Mozart 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: Rethinks motherhood. Back in the sixties and seventies feminists fought to open the workplace to women. Their daughters have rebelled, saying that being a stay-at-home mom is a revolutionary choice. And now the next generation is trying to decide who's right 1530-1600 *BBCR4 The Material World: Many animal species throughout the world are facing the threat of extinction as new diseases spread through their populations, diseases that have unwittingly been introduced by humans. Numerous species have already lost the fight for survival. In Hawaii some bird species are now extinct, and amphibian populations throughout the world are disappearing. Scientists are now going on the counter attack in an effort to prevent other species succumbing to the same threat. Quentin Cooper talks to researchers who are looking at disease threats and conservation. 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Like other wars, the war in Iraq has been aided by the careful use of language to form public opinion. JT Mason welcomes professor of sociology Daniel Schwartz:what role has language played in this war? Also: Can Jews and Palestinians successfully sit down and talk about what to do in the Middle East? That's what Ilyse Cohen, Sephardic Jew, and Palestinian-American Hanan Rasheed will do 1830-2045 *BBCR3 Royal Philharmonic Society Awards: An evening celebrating the RPS Awards, presented for the first time this year in association with BBC Radio 3 and including a special Listeners' Award. Many of the world's finest classical artists gathered last night at the Dorchester Hotel, London, for the ceremony. The fifteen prestigious awards honour outstanding achievements by performers, writers, broadcasters and arts organisations, and demonstrate, in the words of the RPS chairman Tony Fell, that "fervent musical imagination and artistic invention are very much alive". Dame Felicity Lott and Radio 3's Sean Rafferty present the awards, and Stephanie Hughes talks to the musicians and introduces performances of their music 1900-1930 *BBCR4 From The Ashes Of Amritsar: The storming of the Golden Temple in Amritsar in 1984 was followed by almost a decade of violence in Punjab, in which many thousands of people were killed or disappeared. Lovejit Dhaliwal examines the legacy of the conflict and the continuing search for information about those who went missing 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: The U.S. occupation of Afghanistan was supposed to offer real benefits to that country's women. But more than a year later, the gender regulations of the Taliban era are reappearing. Now Iraqi women are watching the growing influence of Shiite clerics in their own country and wondering what the future may hold. We'll discuss the situation both nations' women face 2000-2100 *BBCR2 Mark Lamarr's Shake, Rattle And Roll: Mark Lamarr shares his accumulated vinyl treasure with a wider public. In the final programme of the series, Mark passes the choice of music to his listeners, as he devotes this programme to requests 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Former U.S. Senator George McGovern joins Kathleen Dunn to discuss living the second half of your life to the fullest. Guest: Senator George McGovern, former U.S. senator and democratic presidential candidate in 1972 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: She dresses like an Afghan man, faces down warlords, and rebuilds villages. Sarah Chayes left her job as an NPR reporter to become the field director of the Kandahar branch of Afghans for Civil Society. We'll hear from an American woman helping to rebuild Afghanistan 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Jammin': Last in the series of the panel show that combines comedy and rock 'n' roll. Drummer Rowland Rivron, keyboardist Richard Vranch and bass player Dave Catlin Birch are joined by special guests 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Watching those who'd wish we'd watch our tongues is the purpose of the "Muzzle Awards" given away annually by the University of Virginia. Kathleen Dunn discusses this year's winners with former UW System president Robert O'Neil. Guest: Robert O'Neil, director The Thomas Jefferson Center for the Protection of Free Speech UNIVERSITY OF VIRGINIA Former President University of Wisconsin system Doing program from the National Academy of Science's "Committee on Privacy in the Information Age" meeting in Washington, DC 2206-2300 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Kathleen Dunn talks with a guest about what Americans DON'T know about American history but should. Guest: Kenneth Davis, "Don't Know Much About History" UT FRI MAY 9 FRIDAYS 0000-0100 *WCPN Gray Matters: "Sleep and the Brain": This program explores the value of healthy sleep, which some say is more important to general health than diet, exercise, or heredity. The episode also reviews new findings about sleep deprivation (40 million Americans say they suffer from sleep problems), the dreaming brain and changes in sleep patterns throughout life. Garrick Utley hosts 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: From Lincoln Center in New York, soprano Heidi Grant Murphy joins the New York Philharmonic in music by Handel, Bach and others 0000-2300 *WHRB THE SERGEI PROKOFIEV ORGY: Born April 23, 1891, in Sontsovk, in the Ukraine, Sergei Sergeyevich Prokofiev is one of the major composers of the twentieth century. He attended the St. Petersburg Conservatory from 1904 to 1914, and studied under musicians such as Glière, Rimsky-Korsakov, and Tcherepnin. Although he was recognized as a young man of undeniable talent, his fiery, stubborn, sharply candid, and brash personality earned him the disfavor of some. Prokofiev was part of the new breed of anti-Romantics, working against the tradition stemming from the music of Chopin and Liszt. His earlier works are noted for harsh and strident dissonances – despite complaints from his teachers and critics – but his later music adapts a more lyrical and popular style. Through the course of this orgy, we will hear the innovation and evolution of his music and celebrate his mastery of a wide range of musical genres, including symphonies, film scores, operas, ballets, cantatas, and chamber and solo instrumental works [72 hours straight until Friday 2300] 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: conclusion of War Science: Weapons and Warriors. Heavy machine guns, rapid firing rifles, barbed wire, gas, trenches, tanks - the technologies of the First World War created a four-year stalemate and a ghastly slaughterhouse. The Canadian Corps, led by two remarkable officers, Julian Byng and Arthur Currie, was open to ideas from every direction and powerfully affected the course of "Canada's Greatest War." A retrospective by Gilbert Reid [+1/2/3/4 h] 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE SARS THREAT: Despite the WHO's recent declaration that the SARS outbreak is largely under control, the world remains on edge. Many are speculating that it may become the "Chinese Chernobyl." Where do such destructive diseases originate, how are they transmitted, what can we do to protect ourselves? Our panel of medical experts tonight will address all these questions. They include epidemiologists STEVEN WEBER and SARA VAN ORMAN of the University of Chicago Medical Center and molecular virologist SUSAN BAKER of Loyola University. 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: Critics are calling the $1.4 billion settlement designed to punish Wall Street a hand slap to wealthy firms that gave crooked advice. And they're worried nothing will change. Cleaning Up a Culture of Corruption 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: She dresses like an Afghan man, faces down warlords, and rebuilds villages. Sarah Chayes left her job as an NPR reporter to become the field director of the Kandahar branch of Afghans for Civil Society. We'll hear from an American woman helping to rebuild Afghanistan 0300-0400 *KQED Cleveland City Club Forum: Robert Giles, curator of the Nieman Foundation for Journalism. A Pulitzer Prize winning journalist, Mr. Giles is the former executive editor of The Detroit News. He discusses, among other things, the ethical question of "embedded journalists" with the military in Iraq 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Rethinks motherhood. Back in the sixties and seventies feminists fought to open the workplace to women. Their daughters have rebelled, saying that being a stay-at-home mom is a revolutionary choice. And now the next generation is trying to decide who's right 1400-1500 *KMUW Beyond War: "Waging Peace" People have, in fact, always waged war, but humanity has also always worked for peace. Considers how fully we exhaust peaceful options before resorting to military action. It examines times when nonviolence has been effective as well as when has it been dangerous. In addressing peace, it considers what constitutes a "just" war and asks if no ends justify large-scale killing of human beings. Finally, it examines the social, moral, and spiritual values held by pacifists and conscientious objectors. In "Waging Peace," the second installment of the Beyond War series, we hear about people who refuse military service on grounds of conscience; a college-age peace activist, an Ohio historian who has studied the long tradition of pacifism in America, and a foreign policy expert who chronicles cases in which tyrants have been overthrown through "nonviolent conflict." 1430-1500 *CBCR1 C'est La Vie: a look at the highly- anticipated sequel to "The Decline of the American Empire," the Denys Arcand film that has won more international awards than any other Canadian film [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: 6. Tea And Sandwiches: It's Total Sandwich Week. Michael Rosen explores the language of the sandwich, from the Romans to the Hellmans washing it down with the perfect brew. [Rptd Sun 1930] 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Jazz Legends: Duke Ellington: Crescendo In Blue: Julian Joseph and Brian Priestley continue their survey of composer, pianist and bandleader Duke Ellington, focusing today on the 1930s. Selections include It Don't Mean A Thing, Sophisticated Lady, Daybreak Express, Saddest Tale, Caravan, The Gal from Joe's, Crescendo In Blue and Diminuendo In Blue 1506-1600 *NCPR THE CONNECTION: Habrera Hativeet: Music as a bridge. Habrera Hativeet was the first band to bring the tunes and lyrics of North African Jews to mainstream Israeli culture. A performance of their elaborate weaving of east and west 1606-1700 *WNYC The Leonard Lopate Show: Download Blues: Having trouble downloading your favorite songs? Joseph Menn, author of All the Rave, goes inside the real Napster and explains why Congress put the clamps on it 1606-1700 *WHYY HERE AND NOW: An American photojournalist returns to Nicaragua for the first time since the 1980's, finding many of the same problems he saw when he left. Plus, our human film reviewers offer their thoughts on the mutants who return to the silver screen in "X2: X-Men United." .... 1606-1700 *WFPL Fresh Air with Terry Gross: Actor and comedian Martin Short. His TV series on Comedy Central, Primetime Glick, is a spoof of celebrity talk shows. Short plays Jiminy Glick, the self-absorbed host of the fictitious talk show. He interviews A-list celebrity guests, but often gets information about these guests wrong. The third season of Primetime Glick premiered April 30. Martin Short was a cast member on both Saturday Night Live and SCTV and is starring in the L.A. production of The Producers. His movies include Father of the Bride, The Three Amigos and Innerspace. This interview first aired February 21, 2002. Interviews with composer Burt Bacharach and lyricist Hal David. Burt Bacharach will turn 75 on May 12. Bacharach is said to have revolutionized the sound of the 1960s 1606-1700 *MichR Fresh Air: Burt Bacharach and lyricist Hal David. There's a new Broadway revue of their songs running now, that intersects with Bacharach's Seventy Fifth birthday next week. Also, Martin Short. He's keeping busy with his spoofy talkshow "Primetime Glick" - [so which comes first?] 1706-1800 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: You may think you know a great deal about our city, but what you don't know about Louisville could really change your outlook. In his new book, "Louisville Trivia Challenge," David Inman asks questions about Louisville's local history, as well as the city's history in TV, radio, movies and sports. Test your knowledge Friday as we talk with The Incredible Inman 1800-1830 *BBCR2 Blue Skies: The Work Of Irving Berlin: Part Two: I Speak American A six-part series in which Henry Goodman explores the work of the great songwriter Irving Berlin, whose hits included White Christmas, Cheek To Cheek and Alexander's Ragtime Band. As a lyricist, Berlin managed to communicate directly with the public by using simple words and phrases they understood. How important was his grasp of the vernacular in making his songs into hits? 1806-1900 *WBEZ Worldview: A look at cold war intrigue among Tibet, U.S., and China 1806-1900 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: Fighting Spam / Genetics of Aging: a look at new research on the genetics of aging. Plus, we'll talk about legal and technological solutions for stopping the unsolicited commercial email known as spam 1830-2015 *BBCR2 Friday Night Is Music Night: Maria Ewing, American Mezzo Soprano, performs live from The Mermaid in London. Maria is accompanied by the BBC Concert Orchestra, conducted by John Wilson, for an evening of popular classical music 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION SCIENCE FRIDAY: Music and the Brain / Lunar Eclipse: tips on viewing an upcoming lunar eclipse 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: guest discusses president Bush's deep devotion to Christianity and his religious approach to foreign policy. Guest: Lewis Lapham, Harper's magazine editor. His essay, "Shock and Awe" appears in the May issue of the magazine 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: It's "The Look of Love" on Fresh Air as we hear from Burt Bacharach and lyricist Hal David. There's a new Broadway revue of their songs running now that intersects with Bacharach's 75th birthday next week. We also hear from Martin Short. He's keeping busy with his spoofy talk show "Primetime Glick" that's starting its third season on Comedy Central - and he's also starring in the LA production of "The Producers." 2030-2100 *BBCR2 Listen To The Band: Frank Renton presents the first of three programmes from the European Brass Band Championships in Bergen, Norway, including winning performances and behind the scenes chat 2100-2130 *BBCR2 The Music Never Ends: The Michel Legrand Story. Amour: David Jacobs concludes the story of the Oscar winning composer, revealing his plans for two new stage shows and considering his recent work for Broadway, Amour 2115-2230 *BBCR3 Andy Kershaw: This week's studio session is by an American artist who describes himself as a "folksinger of the rabble-rousing variety". David Rovics has become a fixture on the North American protest scene, performing songs about the environment, US foreign policy, globalization, and, as he puts it, "changing the world". 2200-2230 *BBCR4 Great Lives: Joining presenter Humphrey Carpenter and Richard Ingrams in the studio is the chairman of the Chesterton Society, Denis Conlon to talk about the life of G K Chesterton 2200-2400 *KSUI Know the Score LIVE! Recently-appointed University of Iowa President David Skorton is our opening guest. We'll talk about the challenges facing liberal arts institutions in the twenty-first century, and the question on everyone's lips… "Is he going to keep doing the jazz show?" We'll hear about a fascinating writing project that puts prisoners and victims of crime together and talk to some of the committed people who are making it happen. Among them are University of Iowa Professor of Design Ab Gratama, student Erin McGee, and Humanities Iowa director Chris Rossi. Rounding out the show will be playwright Lisa Schlesinger and singer-songwriter Ben Schmidt 2206-2300 *WPRi Media Talk with Dave Berkman: As the war comes to an end, scrutiny of the media's war coverage begins in full. Dave Berkman's guest discusses how news outlets handled war coverage in the United States and abroad. Guest: Michael Parks, Director School of Journalism – Annenberg School of Communication University of Southern California & former editor L.A. Times UT SAT MAY 10 SATURDAYS 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: Vancouver Early Music presents "The Caledonian Flute". Chris Norman, the "man with the wooden flute," leads his ensemble in chamber works and traditional music from 17th, 18th and 19th century Scotland 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: The conclusion of Regarding Islam. Vancouver writer/ broadcaster Don Mowatt talks with leading scholars about aspects of Islam that have been completely ignored in the current debate. [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0030-0100 *RN DOCUMENTARY: In the early 20th century a British General claimed his country was going to Mesopotamia to liberate it from the Ottomans. It was Gertrude Bell, a remarkable woman from the empire who drew the borders of the country call Iraq and planted the first king on its throne. Not even a century later history is repeating itself. Only this time it is the Americans who are liberating the country in the name of their new empire. Lines in the Sand, Claiming Mesopotamia is produced and presented by Dheera Sujan +6165 9845 0100-0200 *WMNR MIXED BAG «»«»«» Classical Music Hour «» Theme: Marching Along 0100-0200 *WCNY Cinemusic with Chuck Klaus: FANTASTIC ROSENMAN. We'll hear music by composer Leonard Rosenman for the 20th Century Fox Film "Fantastic Voyage." 0106-0200 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: You may think you know a great deal about our city, but what you don't know about Louisville could really change your outlook. In his new book, "Louisville Trivia Challenge," David Inman asks questions about Louisville's local history, as well as the city's history in TV, radio, movies and sports. Test your knowledge Friday as we talk with The Incredible Inman 0106-0200 *MichR The Connection: The ongoing search for weapons of mass destruction 0130-XXXX *KPBS ARCHITECTURE AND THE BRAIN: THE LOUNGE: How does the brain react to architecture? Can architects design works that take into account their effects on people's minds? Joining host Dirk Sutro for his discussion are Fred Gage, a neuroscientist with the Salk Institute, and John Eberhard, director of research and planning for the American Institute of Architects. There will also be a special interview with Daniel Libeskind, the architect of the winning design for the World Trade Center site. (Host Dirk Sutro is an expert on architecture himself. Click here to read his biography.) To participate in the call-in program, phone (888) 895-5727 0200-0230 *WHYY SURVIVAL KIT: WNYC's Leonard Lopate welcomes a single, provocative guest for a discussion, beginning with a simple question: what eight (or so) items would you take with you to a remote location for an extended time? It's a way of discovering fascinating sides of well-known persons and personalities, facets of their life and work and creative process which we might never otherwise see. Roz Chast is this week's adventurer; for over twenty years she's explored the foibles of home and family life in her inimitable drawings. In the process she has changed the way we think of the cartoon form. Her work can be found in almost every issue of the New Yorker magazine and several volumes of her cartoons have been published, including Childproof and Cartoons about Parents and Children. Ms. Chast has lived in and around New York City for most of her life, and I really wanted to know what she would put in her cultural Survival Kit for a lengthy exile from her hometown 0205-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE EVOLUTION OF SPEECHMAKING: What makes a great speech? Everyone has been inspired by The Gettysburg Address and Churchill's Finest Hour speech, for example—-but why were they so effective (if, in fact, they were effective)? John Morley once offered an opinion: "Three things matter in a speech: who says it, how he says it, and what he says—-and, of the three, the last matters the least." Is he right? Tonight, we will examine the evolution of rhetoric and speechmaking with MICHAEL LEFF of Northwestern University and we will, of course, listen to a bevy of historical speeches 0206-0300 *WBUR THE CONNECTION: Habrera Hativeet: Music as a bridge. Habrera Hativeet was the first band to bring the tunes and lyrics of North African Jews to mainstream Israeli culture. A performance of their elaborate weaving of east and west [also on KWMU] 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: It's "The Look of Love" on Fresh Air as we hear from Burt Bacharach and lyricist Hal David. There's a new Broadway revue of their songs running now that intersects with Bacharach's 75th birthday next week. We also hear from Martin Short. He's keeping busy with his spoofy talk show "Primetime Glick" that's starting its third season on Comedy Central - and he's also starring in the LA production of "The Producers." 0206-0300 *WPRi Jean Feraca: John Nichols and Robert McChesney, co-authors of "Our Media, Not Theirs", talk with Jean Feraca about the corporate media take over and its threat to democracy. 0300-0400 *KQED Commonwealth Club: Ted Turner, media entrepreneur and philanthropist. Turner lives up to his reputation for candid and colorful remarks in this recent address. His wide-ranging remarks take aim at the increasing concentration of ownership in the media, saying such concentration is bad for the country "when I'm not doing the concentrating." Turner, who founded CNN, has particularly sharp comments for his rival Rupert Murdoch, owner of the Fox News Channel, which has surpassed CNN in the television ratings 0300-XXXX *KING Live by George offers the original Sadler's Wells production of H.M.S. Pinafore. 0306-0400 *WPRi All About Food: It's that time of the year again. Asparagus are popping up all over! Jean Feraca and chef Eric Rupert bring an asparagus fest and other spring recipes to enjoy this season 0400-0600 *WHRB THE TECH ORGY 0600-1300 *WHRB THE NES UNHEARD ORGY: For our second NES orgy, we present music from games never released in the US, including Mother, Sweet Home, Final Fantasy II & III, Fire Emblem, and more 1200-1300 *BBCR3 World Routes: Lucy Duran presents a concert edition of the programme featuring one of the most successful world bands around. Taraf de Haidouks, a Romanian group whose ages range from twenty to eighty, have taken their unique and energetic gypsy sound all over the world. The band is in the middle of a UK tour, and this show comes from the Usher Hall in Edinburgh 1405-1430 *CBCR1 What a Week: From headline to punchline. This week, the Antiques Road Show visits Baghdad and Jean Chretien answers questions about decriminalizing marijuana [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1630-1654 *BBCR4 Back Row: Love them or hate them, Carry On films are part of our national heritage and to mark the release of a special edition of films on VHS, Back Row looks at what you can be deduced about British social history from the Carry On catalogue 1700-1100 *WHRB THE EARL HINES ORGY: Earl "Fatha" Hines is considered by many to have been the first modern jazz pianist because of the rhythmic and textural innovations he brought to stride piano. His influential career spanned a full six decades, as he recorded steadily from the 20's through the late 70's. But more importantly, and what makes him a joy to listen to, is the palpable sense in all his recordings that he absolutely loved what he was playing and was having the time of his life playing it. This 18-hour orgy during the year of the 100th anniversary of Hines' birth will be a joyful celebration of his life and music. A native of Duquesne, Pennsylvania, Hines began his career as an accompanist. After moving to Chicago in 1924 and playing with several Chicago bands, he met trumpeter Louis Armstrong. Hines and Armstrong recorded together in 1926-28, and their unusually adventurous recordings remain jazz classics, including "West End Blues" and "Weather Bird." 1928 was an important year for Hines, as he recorded his first solo piano sides and also made some now-famous recordings with Jimmy Noone's Apex Club Orchestra. Finally, on his birthday (Dec. 28) of that year, Hines' own band debuted at the Grand Terrace ballroom in Chicago, where it would play for the next twelve years, gaining fame through radio broadcasts and nationwide tours. Some of the outstanding young musicians who played with this band included Charlie Parker, Dizzy Gillespie and Ray Nance, as well as singers Billy Eckstine and Sarah Vaughan. In 1948, economic difficulties forced Hines to break up his band, and he spent three years playing with the Louis Armstrong All-Stars before moving to California and drifting into relative obscurity by the early 1960's. Then, in 1964, Hines' career was revived when he was asked to perform in a series of solo and quartet concerts in New York City's Little Theater. These concerts were the first solo piano recitals that he had ever given, and resulted in a major renewed interest in Hines' music that lasted the rest of his career. He continued to perform and record regularly with his own small groups for the rest of his life 1730-1825 *BBCR3 Florestan Trio: A chance to hear The Florestan Piano Trio performing in a concert recorded last year at the Bridgewater Hall Manchester. Presented by Petroc Trelawny. Beethoven: Variations on 'Ich bin der Schneider Kakadu' for piano trio (Op.121a); Mendelssohn, Felix: Trio for piano and strings No.1 (Op.49) in D minor 1900-2000 *BBCR4 The Archive Hour: Across The Divide: Two gentle giants of folk music, both in their late 80s, British born Bob Copper and American protest singer, Pete Seeger come together and ruminate on the similarities and the differences in their lives. Folk music and family are fundamental to them both, though their cultural backgrounds are very different. We hear them in conversation in a specially extended version of an earlier programme recorded in New York and in performance, and talk to their families about the tradition of folk music that both men have promoted and which their children and grandchildren are handing on to future generations 1930-1950 *BBCR3 Twenty Minutes: Fat Is A Shakespearian Issue: Fat and moral judgements associated with fat are fashionable subject matters today, but they are hardly a modern invention: Falstaff's size is central to his depiction both within the Shakespearean cannon and in the various operas in which he features. A thought-provoking exploration by Diane Purkiss of some of Shakespeare's 70 references to the F-word. [interval feature: time approx.] 2000-2100 *BBCR2 The History Of Psychedelia: David Quantick concludes the two-part documentary examining the changing face of psychedelic music and charting the progression of the psychedelic movement. This week talking to those flying the psychedelic flag at a time when psychedelic music was very much on the fringes of pop 2000-2100 *KQED Radio Specials: We'll hear about the authors of global consciousness and see our world through the eyes of prophetic writers 2005-2100 *WOIa Justice Talking: Your papers, please! Is America ready for a national ID card? Would it protect us from terrorism or take away a precious freedom? Join Margot Adler for a debate on identity, privacy and national security. 2100-2145 *BBCR3 The Verb: As an Iranian child Marjane Satrapi witnessed the overthrow of the Shah, the Islamic Revolution and the war with Iraq. She turned her story into a beautiful and gripping graphic novel, Persepolis, which runs weekly in the French press and has just been translated into English. She talks to Ian McMillan about turning a tumultuous life into a cartoon. Plus a new commission for the programme by playwright David Greig UT SUN MAY 11 SUNDAYS 0000-1100 *WHRB EARL HINES ORGY concludes: see Sat 1700 0300-0400 *WHYY AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: Radio Tanzania Extravaganza with host Georges Collinet 0300-0500 *KPCC THE PLAY`S THE THING: An American Daughter by Wendy Wasserstein, starring David Birney, Gregory Itzin, Kevin McCarthy, Mary McDonnell, and Denise Nicolas. Respected health crusader Dr. Lyssa Dent Hughes seems the perfect choice to be America's surgeon general until a casual remark by a friend sets off a media feeding frenzy. 0501-0600 *BBCWa In Concert: Martin Handley plays highlights from the operas of some of the great composers of the past, exploring the plots that they set to music and the relevance they would have to opera-goers of the time. This week - Giuseppe Verdi 1211-1500 *CBCR1 The Sunday Edition: Host Michael Enright has a eulogy for eulogies. Calgary Bishop Frederick Henry has banned eulogies during the mass. Find out why. Plus a profile of a mother who took up steel drums as a "later in life" hobby. And an unnerving chat with an ER doctor about some of the errors doctors make. Ted O'Reilly one of the country's most knowledgeable jazzman talks about the World's Greatest Jazz Concert, which took place at Massey Hall fifty years ago this week. And a tribute to the great apartheid fighter Walter Sisulu [+1/2/3/4 hours] 1230-1300 *BBCR3 Law Of The Amazon: Second of two programmes in which Clive Anderson takes a trip down the Amazon with a judge, to find out how justice is dispensed in the thick of the Brazilian jungle 1230-1500 *WHRB THE IVO POGORELICH ORGY: Over the last two decades, the compelling interpretations of Yugoslavian pianist Ivo Pogorelich have attracted the attention of audiences around the world not only for their brilliance but also for their frequently controversial nature. Indeed, Pogorelich's original rise to stardom resulted from controversy – in particular, the political controversy surrounding his elimination from the finals of the 1980 Warsaw International Chopin Competition, a result which led juror (and winner of the 1965 competition) Martha Argerich to declare Pogorelich a genius and leave the jury in protest. Pogorelich's playing has since continued to elicit both high praise and deep disapproval. An L.A. Times review declared Pogorelich "a musical figure comparable to Horowitz, Padarewski, and Rachmaninov in setting the style for another era"; the N.Y. Times has called his playing "two hundred years ahead of his time," and a concert review in the London Daily Telegraph raved that "It would be offensive to compare Ivo Pogorelich's playing of Prokofiev's Third Piano Concerto with the composer's own 1932 recording. Offensive because this performance was so infinitely superior to that or any other I can remember." In contrast, the Cincinnati Enquirer complained in 1999 that "the Belgrade-born pianist managed to mutilate almost beyond recognition most of Rachmaninoff's famous Piano Concerto No. 2," and a Philadelphia Citypaper review of the same piece lamented that "as Pogorelich played, Rachy [Rachmaninoff] must have been turning over in his grave." Yet the uncompromisingly strong reactions of Pogorelich detractors, as well as those of his admirers, only testify to the originality of his talent and intellect. Pogorelich was born in Belgrade in 1958 and began playing the piano at age 7. Following his classical training at the Moscow Conservatory, Pogorelich began studies with – and eventually married – the renowned Georgian pianist and pedagogue Alice Kezeradze in 1976, who passed on to him the traditions of the Liszt-Siloti school. Pogorelich continued to maintain a close working relationship with Kezeradze until her untimely death in 1996 [more, playlist at WHRB; resumes at 1630] 1400-1500 *BBCR3 Private Passions: Michael Berkeley's guest today is Rick Moody, one of an up-and-coming generation of successful young American writers, whose 1994 novel, The Ice Storm, was turned by Ang Lee into a powerful film starring Kevin Kline and Sigourney Weaver. His latest book, The Black Veil, is subtitled A Memoir With Digressions, and is based on his own experiences. His musical passions range from Chopin, Tchaikovsky and Arvo Part to Meredith Monk, the Penguin Café Orchestra, and Frank Zappa 1400-1500 *WNYCf On The Media: McCarthy TV: how Sen. Joe McCarthy was one of the first producers of reality TV, and how a modern reality show about the Danish prime minister has undone his diplomacy throughout Europe; Nick Grace of clandestineradio.com on CIA radio to Iraq 1600-1640 *BBCR4 Notes Of Uncertainty: John Wilson investigates the state of the classical music industry. Can it overcome the challenges including an ageing concert audiences, increased competition from other musical forms and a growing number of younger educated consumers who seem uninterested? And why do so many people within the classical musical world object so vociferously to innovations like crossover music and marketing tricks, picked up from the pop business? 1600-1645 *BBCR3 Discovering Music: Chris de Souza takes an in-depth look at Schumann's evergreen and ever-popular Piano Concerto in A Minor (Op. 54). Specially-recorded musical illustrations are performed by pianist Martin Roscoe with the BBC National Orchestra of Wales, under Peter Stark 1600-1800 *KUNI WORLD CHORAL SPECTACULAR: --Hour One: Asia: choirs from China, Taiwan, Japan, South Korea; Hour Two: Youth [details at KUNI] 1600-1800 *KGOU SPECIALS: TBA 1630-0200 *WHRB THE IVO POGORELICH ORGY CONTINUES; see 1230 1645-1730 *BBCR3 Sunday Feature: Django's People: To mark the 50th anniversary of the death of the great gipsy guitarist, Django Reinhardt, Alyn Shipton goes in search of the itinerant Manouche gipsies among whom Django grew up. Is it still possible to trace the musical roots of Reinhardt's style? Among families in the gipsy settlements of Holland and Belgium, strong musical traditions are still handed down from father to son, while in Paris the urban descendents of Django mix new influences with jazz and gipsy music to keep the legacy alive 1700-1800 *WKNO SMART CITY: Developing Seaside, FL; downtown Albuquerque % 1700-1800 *CBCR2 The Singer and The Song: Host Catherine Belyea features music so old it sounds new again! You'll hear music by Abbess Hildegard of Bingen and our old friend 'Anonymous', but for the most part it's innovative music by the poets and composers of the 13th and 14th centuries known as 'troubadours'. Courtly love songs and music to transport the spirit 1700-1900 *KUSP CLASSICAL FOGLIFT: Santa Cruz Chamber Players, Tafelmusik, a musical banquet. Music by Telemann, Quantz and C.P.E. Bach, performed by Leta Miller, flute; Carol Panofsky, oboe and recorder; David Wilson, violin; Joel Schaefer, cello; Jonathan Salzedo, harpsichord 1730-1900 *WPRm LIVE FROM ELVEHJEM: Michael and Kyung Kim, piano: Dvorak: Slavonic Dances, op 46; Beethoven: Sonata in C, op 2/3; Bach- Busoni: Prelude & Fugue in D, BWV 532; Liszt: Vallee D'Obermann; Scriabin: Sonata #10, op 70; Brahms: Hungarian Dances [last of season; resumes in September] 1800-1900 *WPRi To The Best of our Knowledge: Simon Winchester tells the remarkable story of Krakatoa. The volcanic eruption spewed chunks of land 25 miles into the air. The blast was heard 3-thousand miles away. And it kicked up monstrous tidal waves that killed nearly 40– thousand people. We'll also talk with the sons of Edmund Hillary and Tenzing Norgay, the men who first climbed Mount Everest 1900-1930 *BBCR4 A World In Your Ear: Guest presenter Fi Glover, broadcaster and author of the acclaimed book Travels With My Radio, gets into carnival costume and tunes into celebrations around the world 1900-2100 *WMNR NEW YORK PHILHARMONIC «»«»«» Kurt Masur, conductor; Heidi Grant Murphy, soprano; Ewa Podles, mezzo-soprano; Stanford Olsen, tenor; The New York Choral Artists (Joseph Flummerfelt, director) «» Bach: Suite for Orchestra #3 in D Major, S. 1068; Foss: Concertino, "Passacaglia, BACHanalia, Passacaglia"; Handel: Ode for St. Cecilia's Day 1901-2000 *BBCWa In Concert: Martin Handley plays highlights from the operas of some of the great composers of the past, exploring the plots that they set to music and the relevance they would have to opera-goers of the time. This week - Giuseppe Verdi 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Word Of Mouth: 6. Tea And Sandwiches: In Total Sandwich Week, Michael Rosen explores the language of the sandwich, from Romans to Hellmans, washing it down with the perfect brew 2000-2100 *WNYCa On The Media: McCarthy TV: how Sen. Joe McCarthy was one of the first producers of reality TV, and how a modern reality show about the Danish prime minister has undone his diplomacy throughout Europe; Nick Grace of clandestineradio.com on CIA radio to Iraq 2000-2100 *WPRi University of the Air: Native American myths can tell us a lot about ourselves. We'll hear some of them this afternoon starting at three during University of the Air. 2000-2100 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: scientist and author Stephen Wolfram 2000-2100 *KBYU Hitt: Yellowstone: Conc. for Violin & Orch.--Novotny, v; Slovak Radio Symphony Orchestra; Trevor, cond. [sometime during this hour] 2005-2200 *CBCR1 Cross Country Checkup: Fish fight. Fishing communities in both Newfoundland and New Brunswick are enraged at Ottawa's handling of their fisheries. Newfoundland Premier Roger Grimes says he's had enough and wants a new deal within Canada. What do you think? Have the feds mismanaged the fisheries? Would the provinces do better? [live in all zones] 2105-2200 *BBCWe In Concert: Martin Handley plays highlights from the operas of Giuseppe Verdi, exploring the plots he set to music and the relevance to opera-goers of the time 2106-2200 *KQED On the Media: We'll hear how Senator Joe McCarthy was one of the first producers of reality TV. And, why many Arabs don't trust Al Jazeera; Nick Grace of clandestineradio.com on CIA radio to Iraq 2200-2230 *CBCR1 The World this Weekend: Rocking with The Rav: The latest big hit at a New York folk-rock club is Rav Shmuel. He's a young Orthodox Jewish rabbi. As Jon Kalish reports, on Saturday nights, when Sabbath is over, he trades his yarmulke for a fisherman's cap and sings to delighted audiences of every religious persuasion [+1/2/3 hours] 2200-2300 *WGBH ARTS & IDEAS: At the Edge of Asia, Part 2, from The Changing World series, focuses on ritual and modernity in Japan 2200-2300 *WBEZ Sunday night specials: A MOMbo Mother's Day - explores the wonders and woes of motherhood. 2200-2300 *WOIa Jazz Profiles: In a career that has spanned eight decades, Benny Carter has become - by any standard - a jazz legend. Carter, Don Redman, and Fletcher Henderson were the first to pioneer arrangements for the big band in jazz. Together with Charlie Parker and Johnny Hodges, he is regarded as one of the most influential alto saxophonists in jazz. Carter has also made his mark as a composer for numerous motion pictures and television shows. Interviewees include Carter, alto saxophonist Phil Woods, violinist Joe Kennedy Jr., drummer Kenny Washington, and saxophonist-jazz historian Loren Schoenberg 2200-2300 *WCNY Discography with Chuck Klaus: A TCHAIKOVSKY BIRTHDAY TCELEBRATION Remembering the birth of Tchaikovsky, we'll feature performances by ardent Tchaikovsky conductors Leopold Stokowski, Albert Coates, and Nicolai Golovanov 2230-2300 *BBCR4 Something Understood: Music Making: Mark Tully considers the power of music-making to transform chaos and pain in the lives of individuals and communities. In conversation with Professor of Applied Music, Dr June Boyce-Tillman, he hears how making music can help people realise their true potential and enrich their spiritual lives 2300-2400 *CAINAN The Changing World: The Giving Game II 2300-2400 *WBEZ Sunday night specials: Backroads: A Hearing Voices Special- five traveling stories out of public radio's past, audio excursions from the early eighties 2300-0100 *WCNY Orgelwerke with Bonnie Beth Derby: ORGELWERKE PLASTER BLASTER EDITION. It's that time of year when one attends to spring- cleaning. Let Orgelwerke help you clear out the cob-webs and dust with a two-hour plaster-blaster broadcast as you help WCNY-FM with your pledge of support. Beginning at 7:00, tonight's offering will sure help you rattle the rafters and drive the bats away with a number of earth-shaking selections. Remember, you can help WCNY with a pledge of support as we help you with our two-hour blast-the-house edition of Orgelwerke. What a deal! 2315-2345 *BBCR4 A Little Of What You Fancy! In the second of two programmes, Tim Healey looks at how the success of musical hall may also have brought about its decline. In 1912, Music Hall artistes gained social approval when some of them were carefully selected and commanded to perform in the first Royal Variety Performance. Hitherto they had been entertainers of the working class, albeit enjoyed by the 'toffs' and even royalty UT MON MAY 12 MONDAYS 0000-XXXX *WNYCf Transient Glory: Broadcast of Young People's Chorus of New York City Features Six World Premieres. Hosted by WNYC's John Schaefer the broadcast features six world premieres of works commissioned by the chorus 0000-0100 *CAINAN Outright Radio: Living on the Fringe 0000-0100 *WFIU PROFILES: Reverend Ernest Butler: As an unwavering socially activist, The Reverend Ernest Butler has played a pivotal role in having a profound effect on the lives of people in our communities, in Indiana, and beyond. In this edition of Profiles, Reverend Butler shares some of his thoughts and experiences. (Originally aired October 10, 1999) 0000-0100 *WBEZ Sunday night specials: Alternative Radio: The Clash of Barbarisms: The New World Disorder with Gilbert Achcar 0000-0200 *WHRB THE IVO POGORELICH ORGY concludes; see Sun 1230 0030-0130 *KBYU CONCERTS FROM TEMPLE SQUARE: Saltair Barbershop Chorus; Heidi Slagle, s[oprano?]. 0100-0200 *WFIU SPECIAL: TBA 0100-0200 *CAINAN American Mavericks: What's American about American Music [see a listing sometime last week] 0100-0200 *KUSP Another View: Every week, Paul Couture brings you independent non- commercial news, with voices and perspectives that you won't hear in the mainstream media. This week: Patricia Ireland, former President of The National Organization for Women. The woman who led the largest, most visible and successful feminist organization in the U.S. for ten years offers her take on the current status of women, looking at the pitfalls and progress of feminism in the workplace and society at large. She tells us how far we have come, and how far we need to go. As a consultant and author, of a new book What Women Want Ireland continues to champion womens civil rights and social justice 0200-0300 *KUSP Remarkable Radio: Join KUSP for a special Mothers' Day edition of Remarkable Radio. Her Stories is an audio collection produced by and about women, offering great listening for everyone. You'll hear: * The Kitchen Sisters (Lost & Found Sound) at that one-time staple of American housewifery: the Tupperware party. * Poems by Sonia Sanchez, Tracie Morris, Jill Battson and Meryn Cadell. * Jake Warga's sound diary of a woman's two years of Peace Corps service in Africa. * Sisters discuss having and being a sister, a vox-pop collage by Dmae Roberts. * Ginger Miles sound-portrait of Anna Lee, a jazz photographer recently diagnosed with breast cancer 0200-0300 *CAINAN Youth Voices: On Iraq 0200-0300 *WOIa A MOMbo Mother's Day: Nanci Oleson talks with acclaimed author Louise Erdrich. In this gentle and substantive interview, Erdrich discusses her life as a writer and mother of five. Next, listeners meet Michele Weldon, Chicago Tribune columnist and author of I Closed My Eyes. Weldon offers a wry commentary on her favorite mom topic - guilt - head on with wit and confidence. Then, Oleson shares the words of Julia Ward Howe, the originator of Mother's Day. Also, music by fiddler Linda Breitag 0200-0300 *WFIU "What's American About American Music ?": Late 19th century American composers labored while under three contradictory pressures: exhibit a high degree of European polish; be original; create music that would be distinctly American. This debilitating trio of pressures created the fault lines along which American music is still divided today, with each composer deciding which mandate to follow most closely. The result has been two types of American composers - those who feel like part of the European tradition and those who base their work on native ideas and materials. One can follow this apparently permanent divide from the academics versus the homegrown composers of the 19th century to the New Romanticists versus the art- rockers and post-minimalists of the 1980s 0200-0400 *CBCR2 TWO NEW HOURS: An Intimist Triptych: a chamber music marathon with the Molinari Quartet, the Trio Fibonacci, and the Bozzini Quartet. Works by Wolfgang Rihm, Sofia Gubaidulina, Jean Lesage, Serge Provost 0200-XXXX *WHRB THE PAUL HINDEMITH ORGY: This year, we commemorate the 50-year anniversary of the death of Paul Hindemith, one of the most prolific composers of the twentieth century. Born near Frankfurt in 1895, Hindemith studied violin and composition at the Hoch Conservatory and became concertmaster of the Frankfurt Opera Orchestra at the age of twenty. His compositions also brought him public acclaim and the prominence of being one of Germany's leading composers. Increasing difficulties under the Nazi regime forced Hindemith to flee Germany in 1938. He reached the United States in 1940 and became professor of music theory at Yale University, influencing an entire generation of composers. Hindemith returned to Europe in 1953 and died in Frankfurt ten years later. While Hindemith's early music reflects the late Romanticism of Strauss and Reger, he soon found his own voice after passing through both Expressionist and Neoclassical phases. Hindemith's mature style is characterized by clarity of form and a reinterpretation of classical tonality, which differed from that of his contemporaries of the second Viennese School, who preferred the atonal system. Hindemith's association with the concept of Gebrauchmusik ("music for use") led him to write works for children, amateurs, and instruments underrepresented in the classical repertoire, in addition to the many great works for which he is most known [continuous until Wed 1900; details at WHRB] 0206-0300 *KQED To the Best of Our Knowledge with Jim Fleming (Hour One): "Sign Language." "The bearded lady/ tried a jar/ she's now/ a famous movie star/ Burma-shave." Jingles like that could be found on signs across America's highways between the 1930's and the 1950's. In this hour, the story behind the legendary Burma-Shave advertising campaign. Also, the evolution of those small plastic car-plaques - the Jesus fish and the Darwin fish 0300-0400 *KUSC THORNTON CENTER STAGE: Women Composers, Performers & Conductors - featuring music of Joan Tower & other women composers 0306-0400 *KQED To the Best of Our Knowledge with Jim Fleming (Hour Two): "Extreme Cuisine." From Boston to Berkeley, people are going raw. Vegetarians, vegans and Atkins followers are old hat - the hottest trend in food is cool. In this hour, why the raw food movement has people turning off their ovens and trumpeting the healing powers of uncooked food. Also, an inside look at the kosher food industry and globetrotting rabbis who make sure food is fit for faith. And a food artist says it's OK to play with your food 0407-0530 WTAM-1100 Cleveland OH plans to be off part of this time for maintenance, opening the channel again for DX, possibly Brasil [3-081] 0430-0530 *KUNM Radio Theater, "Origins" (of the Santa Fe Trail). Richard Bodner produced this hour, tracing the beginnings of what came to be the Santa Fe Trail, before wagons ever appeared. Part of "Traveling On, Words and Music of the Santa Fe Trail," this is a prequel to "Rolling On" (see listing for May 18, 11 a.m.). Narrator Richard Bodner, musical director/guitarist Carl Bernstein, Native flute and storytelling George Deer Tracks Tyler. Voices: Dr. Sarah Harris, Enrique LaMadrid, Suque Hughes, Allison Maurer and Anne Bradford. Mandolin Steve Townsend, trumpet Steve Ledger, piccolo Dean Perry. Cumberland Gap, John and Dianne Lehman. Additional music from Bil Linzie, Chris Chavez and Pete Chavez. Produced by Jack Loeffler. 0500-0600 *KQED Tech Nation with Moira Gunn: Kitty Ferguson, a historian and the author of "Tycho & Kepler: The Unlikely Partnership that Forever Changed Our Understanding of the Heavens." They'll discuss how one generation of scientists sets the stage for another, going all the way back to the late 16th century. Moira will also speak with Henry Chesbrough, a professor and fellow at Harvard Business School. He'll tell us there's a new orientation to innovation afoot: a new, improved way to build a better mousetrap 1405-1430 *BBCWe Health Matters: Liquid Killers: A look at the role of water in our health, and why illness from contaminated waters is the cause of so much death, despite the fact that it is preventative and treatable 1430-1500 *KUNM Borderviews, "The Decade Of Femicide: Behind The Juarez Murders." Since 1993, more than 340 young women have been murdered in Ciudad Juarez, Chihuahua, a city of about 1.3 million people on the U.S. border that is host to 300 foreign assembly plants as well as a large -scale illegal narcotics export trade. About 100 of the victims are believed to have died at the hands of serial killers. Another 300 young women fitting the profile of rape/murder victims are still reported missing. Ominously, similar killings are being reported in Nuevo Laredo, Tamaulipas; Nogales, Sonora; Chihuahua City; and Palomas, a small town on the New Mexico border. What ties these cases together, besides certain crime commonalities, is that the victims are young, working-class women with no voice or clout in society. More than a few observers are calling this situation gender and class terrorism, and perhaps the greatest known case of femicide in history. The Juarez slayings have become an issue of international human rights, reaching the forums of the United Nations and the Inter-American Commission on Human Rights of the Organization of American States. Nonetheless, the killings and disappearances continue with impunity. This documentary probes the Juarez women's murders and examines why effective action hasn't been taken to stop them. Listeners will hear ambient sounds and the voices of victims' family members, former Mexican government officials and human rights activists. Expert commentary from El Paso Times investigative reporter Diana Washington Valdez and Mexico City journalist Sergio Gonzalez Rodriguez, the author of the explosive new book "Huesos en El Desierto" (Bones in the Desert). Produced by Borderviews 2000 with support from the KUNM Producer's Fund 1500-1530 *BBCR4 The Food Programme: Cornwall: Sheila Dillon introduces the first in a series of collaborations between The Food Programme and BBC Nations and Regions to investigate local food cultures throughout Britain. The team at BBC Radio Cornwall examine the Cornish dining experience from the fisherman's quayside canteen, through the tourist cafés of the Eden Project, to the gourmet delights of Penzance and Newquay, and discover how the annual influx of visitors has shaped the county's food economy. The programme explores some of the recent developments in Cornish food production: the farmer whose ostriches are saving his local food infrastructure, the nettle-pickers kept in work by a local cheese, the burgeoning community of craft ice-cream makers, and the fish merchant searching for new marine harvests in the warm waters around Cornwall 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Stage And Screen: Die Dreigroschenoper To Street Scene: Edward Seckerson explores the Broadway career of Kurt Weill with numbers from Knickerbocker Holiday, Lady In The Dark and his 'American opera', Street Scene 1505-1530 *BBCWa HEALTH MATTERS: See 1405 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: Vartan Gregorian. As a boy growing up in Iran, he escaped poverty and misery by reading books. As a grown up, he helped save the New York Public Library and led one of the country's most prestigious universities 1606-1645 *WPRi Larry Meiller: A beacon from a lighthouse is mighty reassuring to mariners negotiating Lake Michigan and the other Great Lakes. Larry Meiller talks about Door County's lighthouse walk this weekend, and about a public program in Manitowoc this Saturday which illustrates all the lighthouses of Lake Michigan. Guests: Anni Lampert, Lighthouse Walk Co-ordinator, Door County Maritime Museum, Sturgeon Bay, WI; Dianna Stampfler, West Michigan Tourist Association, Grand Rapids, MI 1606-1700 *WAMU KOJO NNAMDI[non]: Eugene Linden: Guest Host: Frank Stasio: Whether examining animal behavior, the Cuban rainforest, or rapid climate change, science writer Eugene Linden takes complicated issues and makes them clear and engaging. Linden joins guest host Frank Stasio to explore the challenges facing us today 1645-1730 *WPRi Larry Meiller: Why are the oceans salty and not the Great Lakes? That's just one of the questions posed and answered by Larry Meiller's guest. He is best-selling author Bill Bryson, whose latest book is an intellectual odyssey called "A Short History of Nearly Everything". (Broadway Books) 1700-1800 *NPR NATIONAL PRESS CLUB: Ramsey Clark, Former U.S. Attorney General: "U.S. Militarism Threatens the Destiny of Humanity" 1705-1755 *VOA TALK TO AMERICA: The Impact of Women on the World: Guests: Jennifer Tucker, Deputy Director, Center for Women Policy Studies (Saudi Newspaper based in London); Dr. Dorree Lynn, Psychologist; Bonnie Angelo, Author of FIRST MOTHERS: THE WOMEN WHO SHAPED THE PRESIDENTS -- President George Washington said " All I am I owe to my mother." Americans celebrated Mother's Day on Sunday, May 11, but the impact these women have on the world is felt everyday. Women throughout the ages have left their mark on the world. Our guests will discuss how women use their subliminal power to change the world % 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Surf rage has been a problem long enough. Surf hogs, the tension between longboarders vs shortboarders, and plain old inexperience have led to some serious brawls. Rather than resort to fisticuffs, why not learn the rules of the surf? John Sandidge talks with local surfer "Boots" McGhee, who sat on an advisory committee to create a surf etiquette brochure; and to the owners of Surf Shop Santa Cruz, who are starting introductory surfing classes. Also: one of the biggest impacts on area emergency rooms are inebriates--people who have had too much to drink and are deposited at the ER to sober up. Is there a more efficient, less expensive way to handle the situation? John talks with Dominican Hospital's ER director, Dr Terry Lapid, and Donna Ramos of the Santa Cruz County Alliance for Health. And hear Assemblyman John Laird's Sacramento report 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Michael Krasny discusses the importance and relevance of classics in the modern world. Guests: Jacob Needleman, professor of philosophy at San Francisco State University and author of many books, including "A Little Book on Love," "Time and the Soul," "The Heart of Philosophy," and "The American Soul"; Herman Haluza, member of the English faculty and the Ancient World Cluster at California State University Hayward; Carolyn Maynard, student coordinator for the Ancient Path Modern Journey conference; Richard Martin, Antony and Isabelle Raubitschek Professor and Chair of Classics at Stanford University and author of "Myths of the Ancient Greeks"; and Kemilynn Ibironke and Jillian Sagi, students in the Ancient World Cluster at Cal State Hayward and presenters at the conference [under the impression that KQED did not offer audio archives, we have assumed one must catch FORUM live, or when one of the two hours at 1606 and 1706 is repeated at 0506 (late in the day, which one may be posted on the daily schedule). But now we find that an extensive archive of FORUM does exist: %] 1800-2200 *BBCR3 Performance On 3: Wigmore Hall Director's Festival Gala: Petroc Trelawny introduces this farewell gala for William Lyne, celebrating his 36 years as Director of the Wigmore Hall in London. For his last concert he has assembled a starry line-up of some of the greatest artists who have graced the Wigmore platform over the last two sesquidecades. Artists include Steven Isserlis, Felicity Lott and Ann Murray, Ian Bostridge, Graham Johnson and Malcolm Martineau, the Belcea Quartet and James Bowman. During the two intervals, William Lyne talks to Petroc Trelawney and looks back over some of the highlights of his reign. [More details at BBCR3/Whatson listings]. Part 3: the artists let their hair down, with a medley of songs and numbers, and plenty of old favourites. After an appearance by Wigmore Hall's Quartet in Residence, the Belcea Quartet, all the evening's participants squeeze onto the Wigmore stage for a final send-off 1900-1930 *BBCR4 Which Way Are We Facing? Gavin Esler continues his investigation of whether we are becoming closer to Europe or to America 1905-1930 *BBCWe HEALTH MATTERS: See 1405 1930-2000 *BBCR4 Crossing Continents: Kenya's new government wants to show it's serious about clamping down on corruption, it has introduced compulsory free education and released prisoners from death row. But schools are bursting at the seams. There are not enough teachers and average class sizes are now up to 120. So can Kenya's National Rainbow Coalition government really overturn decades of misrule and corruption? Esther Armah travels to Nairobi to find out. 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Nature: Chris Mead, The Nightingale Man: Lionel Kelleway pays tribute to broadcaster and ornithologist, Chris Mead who worked tirelessly for the British Trust for Ornithology for over forty years [more at BBCR4/Whatson] Lionel Kelleway also joins Rob Fuller from the BTO as he goes in search of a dusk chorus by the nightingale, and talks about the results of the Nightingale Survey, pioneered by Chris Mead, and launched by Dame Vera Lynn in 1998, and the subsequent work to manage habitats for the nightingale and secure its future in this country 2105-2130 *BBCWa HEALTH MATTERS: See 1405 2300-2400 *WQXR Special: Avery Fisher Awards Special - solo instrumentalists receive grants at a Lincoln Center program; hosted by Robert Sherman [NYRG; WQXR specials says it`s "Tue May 12" 2300] 2305-2330 *CBCR1 Home: Inside the Bachelor Pad. Hugh Hefner joins host Jane Farrow in a discussion of how the home can be used as an instrument for seduction by tracing the history of the single man's love lair. Turn on the strobes, have some wine, listen to the ultra-modern stereo, and slip into something a little more comfortable. It's time to visit the 21st century shag pad [+1/2/3/4 hours] UT TUE MAY 13 TUESDAYS 0000-0100 *KGOU SPECIAL: TBA 0000-0200 *WOIf Des Moines Symphony: Fiesta: Elmar Oliveira, violin: Revueltas: Sensemaya; Chavez: Sinfonia India; Copland: El Salon Mexico; Barber: Violin Concerto; Ravel: Bolero 0000-2400 *WHRB PAUL HINDEMITH ORGY see Monday 0200 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: The Enright Files. Michael Enright, host of The Sunday Edition, talks with original and influential contemporary thinkers in this monthly, Monday night Ideas feature. This week, Wrestling with Hard Things: Michael talks with Sandra Mitchell, professor in the Department of the History and Philosophy of Science at the University of Pittsburgh, and David Noble, historian at York University, about why it's so hard to understand science. Also, a conversation with poet and teacher Sheldon Zitner about why it's so hard to understand poetry [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR Todd Mundt: Jill Fredston and her husband study avalanches and teach people how to save themselves. 0006-0100 *WPRi On Point: In the early 1920s, society girl Janet Elliot Wulsin traded in her silver spoon for a canteen and set off to explore the far reaches of Tibet, China, and Mongolia. Out from the shadows at last, the remarkable life of explorer Janet Elliott Wulsin. GUEST: Mabel Cabot, daughter of Janet Elliott Wulsin, author of "Vanished Kingdoms: A Woman Explorer in Tibet, China, and Mongolia 1921-1925" 0030-XXXX *YPR Theresa Keaveny, of Montana Conservation Voters, discusses the environmental record of the 2003 legislature 0105-0130 *BBCWe HEALTH MATTERS: See Mon 1405 0130-0200 *RCSPf CONTATO - Música eletrônica SÉRIE ESPECIAL - WENDY CARLOS. Programa 2 0206-0300 *WHYY JUSTICE TALKING: Is America ready for national identity cards? Since 9-11, some have called for a vast database that might help protect Americans from terrorism. Civil libertarians warn that national IDs are the cornerstone of authoritarian regimes and threaten the privacy and freedom of us all. Margot Adler has a debate on citizenship, identity and national security 0300-0400 *KQED It's Your World: "Special Session with Senator Joe Biden: Commencement of the World Affairs Council's 57th Annual Conference" Senator Biden is the top Democrat on the Senate Foreign Relations Committee and, as such, is also "the Democratic party's chief spokesman on national security and foreign policy issues." Biden will introduce the World Affairs Council's 57th Annual Conference with a talk on U.S. foreign policy and specifically the prospects in Central Asia. (The "It's Your World" program was previously called "The World Affairs Council.") 0300-0400 *WUMB AFROPOP WORLDWIDE: The charismatic Georges Collinet brings us contemporary popular music from Africa and beyond. Tonight: "Radio Tanzania Extravaganza." Georges digs into the archives of the radio station that recorded many seminal bands 0300-0400 *WNYCf New Sounds Program #2082: Philip Glass presents selections from his soundtrack for the silent film Naqoyqatsi, the third installment in the Qatsi trilogy. And Ben Neill drops by the studio to talk about his latest release "Automotive" - expanding on some of the music he's done for VW commercials % 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: Vartan Gregorian. As a boy growing up in Iran, he escaped poverty and misery by reading books. As a grown up, he helped save the New York Public Library and led one of the country's most prestigious universities 0306-0400 *WHYY THE CONNECTION: A life in libraries. As a boy growing up in Iran, Vartan Gregorian escaped poverty and misery by reading books. As a grown up, he helped save the New York Public Library and led one of the country's most prestigious universities. He's now running a major philanthropy and writing his own book xxxx-0400 *WGN EXTENSION 720: THE CHINESE IN AMERICA: Several years ago, IRIS CHANG created an intense historical furor with the publication of 'The Rape of Nanking,' a startling chronicle of the Japanese war against China. Now, she turns her focus to the Chinese experience in the United States. From the earliest immigrants and the notoriously- treated railroad workers to the development of "Chinatowns" throughout America's big cities and the continued flourishing of Chinese descendents, Chang traces the dynamic history of the Chinese immigrants. Her new book is The Chinese in America and she will join us following the 0005 UT stupid ballgame 1130-1300 *CBCR1 The Current: The media world is abuzz after a New York Times reporter is forced to quit for fabricating and plagiarizing details in dozens of stories. But Jayson Blair is not alone: parts of one of the most beloved speeches of all times were reportedly taken from another speaker. Anna Maria Tremonti examines the history of plagiarism [+ at least two more topics in the sesquihour, +1/2/3/4h] 1230-1300 *BBCR4 Taking Note: Verdi: Series featuring familiar pieces of classical music analysed by experts. Conductor Mark Elder, choral director, Simon Halsey and Verdi expert, Roger Parker discuss Verdi's Requiem 1305-1330 *BBCWe Masterpiece: Everyday Design: Ed Butler hears from designers to find out how they create everyday objects that are both effective and alluring. This week he looks at packaging 1305-1400 *WPRi Joy Cardin: According to Joy Cardin's guest, the pharmaceutical industry is dramatically increasing the price of the drugs that many people need to stay healthy, in order to justify the cost of their elaborate marketing campaigns. Guest: Katharine Greider, a journalist and freelance magazine writer. She is the author of "The Big Fix: How The Pharmaceutical Industry Rips Off American Consumers" (Public Affairs) 1400-1500 *KMUW WHOLE WIDE WORLD: The many promises of recovery in electronic technology, common culture, and adaptive instincts for self- preservation 1405-1430 *BBCWa EVERYDAY DESIGN: See 1305 1406-1500 *WPRi The Connection: Leaders from around the world are demanding that President Robert Mugabe retire and clear the way for democracy. Exiled journalist Geoffrey Nyarota discusses the prospects for a Mugabe-free Zimbabwe 1430-1500 *BBCWe Music Review: Opera In The 21st Century: Stephanie Hughes talks to cutting edge composers about their musical inspiration. This week she talks to Mzilikazi Khumalo, composer of the first black South African Opera 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Voices: My Kind Of Song, Sir Edward Downes: Iain Burnside talks to the conductor Sir Edward Downes about the singers who have made a special impression on him in his long and distinguished career. His chosen recordings include music by Mussorgsky, Mahler, de Falla and Canteloube, with a wide variety of voices including Gigli, Madeleine Grey, Yvonne Minton, Pavarotti and Dmitri Hvorostovsky 1506-1600 *WPRi The Connection: As the FCC loosens its grip on media ownership rules, some print and broadcast outlets that already share owners are experimenting with sharing news coverage, as well. Media convergence and questions of quality 1530-1600 *BBCWa MUSIC REVIEW: See 1430 1606-1700 *WNYC The Leonard Lopate Show: Comedy: Satire and Celluloid: Comedy Central's Amy Sedaris and Paul Dinello, of Strangers With Candy join The Daily Show's Stephen Colbert to discuss their latest project, a satiric look into small town life, Wigfield. Also, the lost comedy starring Fatty Arbuckle and Buster Keaton and more 1606-1700 *WBEZ Fresh Air: The CIA's intersection with the Soviet Union and their long excursion into Afghanistan [also MichR] 1606-1700 *KQED Forum Friday with Michael Krasny (Hour One): Forum examines a Pentagon proposal to exempt military bases from environmental laws. Guests: Saul Bloom, executive director of Arc Ecology, a San Francisco-based environmental group focusing on the US military; Craig Manson, Assistant Secretary of the Interior for Fish, Wildlife and Parks and oversees the National Park Service and US Fish and Wildlife Service; Frank Gaffney, president of the Center for Security Policy and former Assistant Secretary of Defense for International Security Policy during the Reagan administration; and Edwin Lowry, director of the California Department of Toxic Substances Control 1700-1800 *CAINAN THE POINT: Summer Movies: Tim Miller, Entertainment Editor of the Cape Cod Times, discusses summer movie fare 1700-1800 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: The Louisville Orchestra is the oldest principal arts organizations in the city and it has an international reputation for programming contemporary works. Recently, the orchestra was unable to pay musicians and staff because of its financial crises. Join the conversation on Tuesday as we talk with musician Tim Zavadil and Executive Director Tim King about the future of the Louisville Orchestra 1706-1800 *WHYY THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: Medical researchers are creating devices, some smaller than a molecule, that attack illness where it happens - inside the body. Nanotechnology: it's the new frontier of medicine, and we'll talk to one of the people leading the way Dr. James Baker [also MichR] 1706-1800 *WBEZ Odyssey: Commercial Speech and the Constitution 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Host Deanna Zachary talks with journalist Mark Lee about his war coverage in East Timor and Africa. They'll talk about why he was expelled from Uganda, and about his new novel, Canal House, based on his work as a foreign correspondent 1800-2100 *BBCR2 various music series; see also DAY 1800-1900 *BBCR2 Evelyn Glennie's Classics: This week's soundtrack is from The Hours, this week's composer is Aaron Copland, and Evelyn plays with the North Texas Wind Symphony 1805-1830 *BBCWe MASTERPIECE: See 1305 1900-1930 *BBCR2 THE ORGANIST ENTERTAINS: whatson never has any details, but there is a PLAYLIST 1900-1940 *BBCR4 File On 4: Allan Urry investigates how the war in Iraq has created a boom time for the defence industry. and reveals new evidence of the extent of the links between Government and the industry. [Rptd Sun 1600] 1905-1930 *BBCWa EVERYDAY DESIGN: See 1305 1930-1950 *BBCR3 Twenty Minutes: Plant-Hunting In Kazakhstan: Anna Pavord's lavish and hugely erudite recent book on The Tulip was an international best-seller. It seemed to leave no botanical or historical stone unturned, but, in fact, there was one final chapter to the story. Recently she travelled independently to Kazakhstan to hunt out one last species and here she recalls the trip. In Kazakhstan she found a landscape littered with remains of the Stalin years but - hidden in a glade in the mountains - she also discovered the flower for which she had long been searching [interval feature; time approx.] 1930-2000 *BBCWe MUSIC REVIEW: See 1430 1930-2030 *BBCR2 The Bee Gees Story: From Manchester To Massachusetts: How the Bee Gees forged their unique and compelling singing style. We follow their career from their upbringing in Manchester through early performances in Australia, the Beatles influence, arrival in the UK, first meeting with manager Robert Stigwood. Through the early hits, New York Mining Disaster, To Love Somebody and Massachusetts, to the first rumblings of disharmony amongst the brothers. It concludes with their change of direction to a new form of blue eyed soul and dance music, which became Saturday Night Fever, and fuelled the world's most enduring dance music genre: Disco. Presented by Steve Wright 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: It's been twenty months since the first U.S. military strike at the Taliban. We travel back to the 1980's to peek into the CIA's intersection with the Soviet Union and their long excursion into Afghanistan. We'll hear from the 60- Minutes producer who's written a book about the covert-funding operation, and from the Texas Congressman who worked with the CIA to fund the jihad 2030-2100 *BBCR2 Diggin' Diz: In the fourth of a six part series, Guy Barker profiles the life and music of trumpeter, composer, and vocalist Dizzy Gillespie. Tonight he looks at Gillespie's character as a showman a politician, an entertainer and a humorist. With contributions from trumpeter and author Digby Fairweather, John Dankworth, biographer Alyn Shipton and D G himself, plus music from Gillespie, Cab Calloway, The Double Six of Paris, Jon Hendricks and former US President, Jimmy Carter! 2030-2100 *BBCR4 Unreliable Evidence: War And The Rule Of Law: Clive Anderson demystifies more legal issues. Today, he examines International Law and its function before, during and after a war 2106-2200 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: Counter-terrorism expert Paul Bremer III replaces retired Lieutenant General Jay Garner as the top administrator in Iraq. Join Kathleen Dunn and her guest after four when they discuss the overhauling of Iraq's interim government. Guest: John Steinbruner, professor of Public Policy at the School of Public Affairs @ the University of Maryland 2130-2200 *BBCWa MUSIC REVIEW: See 1430 2206-2300 *WPRi Education Tuesday with Kathleen Dunn: According to Kathleen Dunn's guest, the world of academics at university level is incomprehensible to the students, and he urges all professors to promote discussions that are more relevant and meaningful to students, and the rest of us. Guest: Gerald Graff, professor of English and Education at the University of Illinois at Chicago. He is the author of "Beyond the Culture Wars" and "Clueless in Academe: How Schooling Obscures the Life of the Mind" (Yale University Press) 2300-xxxx *WABE Asian American Forum: A panel of representatives from the Korean, Japanese, Chinese, and Vietnamese communities in Georgia discuss the political, economic, and cultural contributions that Asian Americans have made to Georgia, as well as the history of discrimination and injustice that Asians in Georgia and across the United States have experienced. The panel also addresses the diversity within the Asian American community and the importance of fostering a better understanding of Asian American culture 2300-2400 *WFMU Nancy Sinatra: on Jonesville Station Nancy Sinatra joins Glen in Jonesville for a conversation regarding her life and times in show business, from Jersey City to Hollywood and all the stops in between [NOT: antique record show instead!] 2300-2400 *WQXR Avery Fisher Awards Special: On May 6, the Avery Fisher Artist Program announces the 2003 Avery Fisher Career Grants at an event at Lincoln Center hosted by Robert Sherman. The Avery Fisher Career Grant program, currently in its 29th year, is given annually to outstanding solo instrumentalists in order to give professional assistance and recognition to those talented instrumentalists who have potential for solo careers. The performances by the grant recipients at this event will be broadcast on this special program. The 2003 Avery Fisher Career Grants will be awarded to five recipients: two violinists, one violist, one flutist, and one pianist [not: must have been Monday, tho on WQXR SPECIALS and NYRG as ``Tuesday May 12``] UT WED MAY 14 WEDNESDAYS 0000-1900 *WHRB PAUL HINDEMITH ORGY concludes; see Mon 0200 0005-0030 *BBCWS MASTERPIECE: See Tue 1305 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: One Small Garden: with spring now underway, an hour of gardening, botany and the stories brought to mind by a tiny downtown garden in Toronto. A book written to be shared with children, read aloud by its author, Barbara Nichol [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0006-0100 *MichR THE TODD MUNDT SHOW: Medical researchers are creating devices, some smaller than a molecule, that attack illness where it happens - inside the body. Nanotechnology: it's the new frontier of medicine, and we'll talk to one of the people leading the way Dr. James Baker 0100-0200 *WFPL State of Affairs with Julie Kredens: The Louisville Orchestra is the oldest principal arts organizations in the city and it has an international reputation for programming contemporary works. Recently, the orchestra was unable to pay musicians and staff because of its financial crises. Join the conversation on Tuesday as we talk with musician Tim Zavadil and Executive Director Tim King about the future of the Louisville Orchestra 0100-0300 tvTVL TEN SKETCHES FROM YOUR SHOW OF SHOWS 0106-0200 *WPRi Joy Cardin: The pharmaceutical industry is dramatically increasing the price of the drugs that many people need to stay healthy, in order to justify the cost of their elaborate marketing campaigns. Guest: Katharine Greider, a journalist and freelance magazine writer. She is the author of "The Big Fix: How The Pharmaceutical Industry Rips Off American Consumers" (Public Affairs) 0130-0200 *BBCWS MUSIC REVIEW: See Tue 1430 0206-0300 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: It's been twenty months since the first U.S. military strike at the Taliban. We travel back to the 1980's to peek into the CIA's intersection with the Soviet Union and their long excursion into Afghanistan. We'll hear from the 60- Minutes producer who's written a book about the covert-funding operation, and from the Texas Congressman who worked with the CIA to fund the jihad 0206-0300 *WPRi The Connection: Leaders from around the world are demanding that President Robert Mugabe retire and clear the way for democracy. Exiled journalist Geoffrey Nyarota discusses the prospects for a Mugabe-free Zimbabwe 0300-0400 *KQED It's Your World: "Central Asia After the Cold War." Tonight's speakers are: Olivier Roy, Senior Research Director, Centre National de la Recherche Scientifique, France; and Barnett Rubin, Director of Studies and Senior Fellow, Center on International Cooperation, New York University. Led by session chair Ambassador Michael Armacost, this panel will discuss issues such as: who really cares about Central Asia, the complexities of the region, and the post 9-11 security structure of the region 0306-0400 *WPRi The Connection: As the FCC loosens its grip on media ownership rules, some print and broadcast outlets that already share owners are experimenting with sharing news coverage, as well. Media convergence and questions of quality; Guests: Marvin Kalb, con; and Forrest ---, news director of WFLA-TV, pro 0400-0500 *KQED City Arts & Lectures: Scientist and author Stephen Wolfram [yes, one hour later than usual due to IYW series at 0300] 1230-1300 *BBCR4 Land Lines: Brett Westwood presents a new location-based puzzle series, all about reading the landscape - the built and natural landscape - to uncover the lines that have linked people to a place throughout history. Why did people settle there? How has the landscape and natural history shaped the human history? How have people in turn shaped the landscape? And, most importantly, how can you read that story in the landscape today? Each week, Brett takes two 'landscape detectives' to a place that they don't know and sets them the challenge of reading the story of that landscape armed with a package of cryptic clues provided by local people. The connections they find might be to do with food, farming, industry, transport, religion, folklore, wildlife or a particular feature of the landscape - heath, sea, river, woodland, mountain, fen. And the place itself can be anything from a village to an island to a city. This week, the programme is set in the fields around a Gloucestershire village. 1305-1330 *BBCWe All In A Day's Work: A series which focuses on the remarkable stories of people's everyday lives; and through those daily routines reveals how much our jobs tell us about how our communities work [3-083] 1306-1400 *WPRi Joy Cardin: The New York Times recently fired a young, black reporter for journalistic fraud. Joy Cardin welcomes columnist John Leo who says that when newsrooms favor diversity, they sacrifice journalistic integrity. Guest: John Leo, columnist for U.S. News and World Report 1405-1430 *BBCWa All In A Day's Work: A series which focuses on the remarkable stories of people's everyday lives; and through those daily routines reveals how much our jobs tell us about how our communities work [3-083] 1500-1530 *BBCR4 Thinking Allowed: Political, unspeakable, exotic and holistic... eating Chinese has meant different things at different times in Britain. As eating habits continue to evolve, Laurie Taylor investigates whether Chinese cuisine can survive increasing demands for novelty 1530-1600 *BBCR4 Case Notes: Does Work Make You Sick?: Dr Graham Easton explores occupational medicine, with tips on avoiding repetitive strain injury and what to do when ill-health prevents you from working 1606-1700 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour One): bicycle transportation in the Bay Area. Bike to Work Day is May 15. Guests: Deb Hubsmith, spokesperson for the Regional Bicycle Advocacy Coalition; Steve Kinsey, chair of the Metropolitan Transportation Commission; Ken Garcia, columnist for the San Francisco Chronicle; and Josh Hart, program director of the San Francisco Bicycle Coalition 1612-1700 *WCPN Around Noon: Today Dee is joined by world-famous bass-baritone Mark Doss, who talks about his beginnings as a singer in his hometown of Cleveland as he gets ready to perform with The Singers' Club. Doss made his professional debut with The Singers' Club back in the mid- 80s; today, he's one of the premier opera singers in the United States, having performed throughout Europe, Australia, and North America. Dee chats with Doss about his career and the challenges he's faced as an African American 1706-1800 *KUSP Talk of the Bay: Public radio has always been an idyllic island of independence in a sea of media conglomerates, and it looks like the waters may be about to rise. On June 2nd, the FCC reviews the rules that govern broadcast ownership. Rachel Goodman presents the options, and hears why they may or may not be good ideas 1706-1800 *KQED Forum with Michael Krasny (Hour Two): Eric Schlosser, author of "Reefer Madness: Sex, Drugs, and Cheap Labor in the American Black Market." His first book, "Fast Food Nation," spent more than a year on the New York Times bestseller list. He has been a correspondent for the Atlantic Monthly since 1996 1805-1830 *BBCWe All In A Day's Work: A series which focuses on the remarkable stories of people's everyday lives; and through those daily routines reveals how much our jobs tell us about how our communities work [3-083] 1806-1900 *NPR Talk of the Nation with Neal Conan (Hour One): In the first hour: "Democrats." Tax cuts, Iraq -- on one issue after another, the Democrats find themselves divided. The presidential primaries are less than nine months away and Democratic-unity takes center stage for the party. This hour, the changing definition of "Democrat." 1900-1945 *BBCR4 The Law In Question: 2. Freedom Of Expression: Marcel Berlins brings lawyers and listeners together to tackle moral and legal dilemmas. Are we tongue-tied by political correctness? [Rptd Sat 2115] 1900-1400 *WHRB THE FUGAZI ORGY: For slightly over fifteen years the band Fugazi has revolutionized the world of underground rock, always defying definitive labels yet at the same time inspiring critics and pop- culture scholars to invent terms such as "post-hardcore" and "emo" to describe their ingenuity and ever unique sound. Fugazi's steadfast independent ethics and ability to create beautiful and evolving music earned them notoriety beyond the traditional punk rock and hardcore scenes, but they never lost the loyalty of their natural fan base and have acquired an almost mythical status across the musical spectrum. This orgy is a thorough retrospective of the music of Fugazi from their earliest work of 1987 to their most recent releases in 2002. Although the format is chronological, there will be three distinct segments. The first will be the band's easily available music, contained in eight full albums and two singles. The second will encompass the harder to find music, including bootlegs, outtakes, and live recordings spanning Fugazi's career. The third segment will consist of side projects of band members during the 1987-2002 period, including Pailhead, Black Light Panthers, the All Scars, Lois (w/Brendan Canty) and Joe Lally's metal band 1905-1930 *BBCWa All In A Day's Work: A series which focuses on the remarkable stories of people's everyday lives; and through those daily routines reveals how much our jobs tell us about how our communities work 1906-2000 *NPR TALK OF THE NATION: It's the story of an imperial democracy, whose military, cultural and economic dominance upset the balance of power and triggered a disastrous war -- 2,500 years ago. Host Neal Conan speaks with Yale classicist Donald Kagan on Athens, Sparta and the lessons of the Peloponnesian War 2000-2030 *BBCR4 Frontiers: Plasmodium falciparum is a deadly malarial parasite. Transmitted by mosquito, it is responsible for more than a million deaths every year. Peter Evans hears from biologists, geneticists and entomologists as he unravels the complex story of the parasite's long relationship with humans. So powerful was its impact that our genes mutated to provide a degree of immunity. Ironically, those genetic changes created a population overly prone to various forms of anaemia, especially thalassemia and sickle cell anaemia. 2006-2100 *WPRi Kathleen Dunn: guest says that, "American nationalism is defined not by notions of ethnic superiority, but by a belief in the supremacy of U.S. democratic ideals." Join them after three for a discussion on the paradoxes of American nationalism. Guest: Mixin Pei, Senior Associate and Co-Director of China Program at the Carnegie Endowment for International Peace 2006-2100 *KQED Fresh Air with Terry Gross: When he was a Senator, John F. Kennedy wrote: "The courage of life is often a less dramatic spectacle than the courage of a final moment; but it is no less a magnificent mixture of triumph and tragedy." Historian Robert Dallek talks with Terry Gross about his new biography of John F. Kennedy, "An Unfinished Life." It reveals new information about his health problems, his adulterous relationships and his political career [as with most non-local programs, there are plenty of other times to hear it, tho we may list only the stations with convenient up-to-date previews; consult publicradiofan.com for other opportunities] 2100-2130 *BBCR2 Charlie Gillett Without Frontiers: Husbands And Wives: Charlie Gillett showcases an eclectic selection of music on a particular theme. From last week's Brothers And Sisters, Charlie turns his attention to Husbands And Wives. As always, Charlie looks at how musicians from a number of different countries have interpreted the subject in their own particular style. Amongst the selections for this week's show are artists from Algeria, America, New Zealand and Britain. As an example of musical harmony not necessarily meaning marital bliss, he begins with the former husband and wife recording duo of Ike and Tina Turner and their recording A Fool In Love, and continues with one of country music's most popular, though notoriously sparring couples, George Jones and Tammy Wynette 2230-2300 *CBCR1 Dispatches: Do the Palestinians have the wherewithal to create the state they want? CBC Radio Laura Lynch presents a special report [+1/2/3/4 hours] UT THU MAY 15 THURSDAYS 0000-0200 *CBCR2 In Performance: live from Jack Singer Concert Hall in Calgary, the finals of the 32ndCBC/Radio-Canada National Competition for Young Performers. Three finalists perform with the Calgary Philharmonic Orchestra conducted by Raffi Armenian. Host Eric Friesen is joined by commentators Leslie Uyeda and John Estacio. 0000-1400 *WHRB *WHRB THE FUGAZI ORGY concludes; see Wed 1900 0005-0030 *BBCWe All In A Day's Work: A series which focuses on the remarkable stories of people's everyday lives; and through those daily routines reveals how much our jobs tell us about how our communities work [3-083] 0005-0100 *CBCR1 Ideas: Part One of a profile of Rene Descartes. Generally regarded as the father of modern philosophy, Descartes set out on a daring intellectual adventure to try to doubt everything - including his own physical existence. Mathematician, astronomer, physicist - get to know the life and legacy of the "first modern man" [+1/2/3/4 hours] 0106-0200 *WPRi Joy Cardin: The New York Times recently fired a young, black reporter for journalistic fraud. After eight, Joy Cardin welcomes columnist John Leo who says that when newsrooms favor diversity, they sacrifice journalistic integrity. Guest: John Leo, columnist for U.S. News and World Reports 0200-XXXX *KUSP Health Dialogues: Poor dental health is a little-known but widespread public health problem in California, especially among low-income residents, immigrants and minorities. Since many low- income patients lack dental insurance and are struggling with other living expenses, they often hold out until they need emergency care. How can we provide better access to quality care, and how can we encourage people to take advantage of it? What role should dental insurance play in California's health care system? Weigh in on these questions at 800-811-6830, during the state-wide call-in program, Health Dialogues -- featuring host Scott Shafer from KQED's California Report, and a panel of experts [also on KQED] 0300-0400 *KQED Radio Specials: It's Your World: "Energy, Development and Economic Reforms in Central Asia." Tonight's speakers are Julia Nanay, Senior Director at PFC Energy; Ambassador Steven Mann, Senior Advisor for Caspian Basin Energy Diplomacy; and Daene McKinney, Associate Professor, Environmental and Water Resources Engineering Program, University of Texas at Austin. Chaired by Jan Kalicki, Counselor for International Strategy at ChevronTexaco Corporation, this panel will explore one of the most pivotal issues surrounding Central Asia - its natural resources, such as oil and natural gas 0400-0500 *KQED Radio Specials: Whole Wide World: This week, host Christopher Lydon engages listeners in a live broadcast and internet conversation on our globalized society 1400-2400 *WHRB THE CARLO GESUALDO ORGY: Don Carlo Gesualdo, Prince of Venosa (c1560-1613), was a wealthy Italian nobleman whose greatest claim to fame for centuries after his death was the infamous murder of his wife and her lover in their estate outside of Naples in 1590. Ultimately, though, it is his dramatic influence on the musical language of the Renaissance and early Baroque for which he will be most remembered. He was the most avant-garde Italian composer of his time, stretching the traditional rules of harmony to an extent that was not surpassed, many say, until Wagner. His music is dramatic and expressionistic, reflecting (sometimes to an almost painful point) the nuances of his texts. His excruciatingly chromatic vocal writing is some of the most difficult music from the period to sing. Gesualdo received musical training as a child and began composing music from an early age. Several years after the murder of his wife, for which he was never brought to justice, Gesualdo moved to Ferrara, the center of Italian musical activity in this period, and married a Ferrarese noblewoman. This new location brought him into contact with some of the most active composers of his day, as well as some of the most skilled performers;. With this new community, his music took a dramatic turn and continued to show the influence of Ferrara even after he moved back to Naples. His indelible harmonic style becomes clearer than ever in the later works. We present a survey of his music from the entire span of his compositional career, culminating in a wrenching performance of Gesualdo's complete Tenebrae Responsories, the last work published during his lifetime and, as many would have it, the pinnacle of his creative output 1500-1600 *BBCR3 Music Restored: Lucie Skeaping's guest today is the direc